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TitleWorld Congress on Communication for Development
LanguageEnglish
File Size735.0 KB
Total Pages226
Document Text Contents
Page 1

87

Communication
Labs

This section reviews the workshops from the CommunicationLabs strand of the Congress, which addressed the cross-cutting
nature of Communication for Development, looking at method-
ological issues such as impact evaluation and the adoption of par-
ticipatory communication approaches, as well as the use of media
(including community media) and ICTs in development initiatives.
This section also includes ideas and recommendations from the two
special events on communication and disabilities and indigenous
peoples, which were also considered important issues in which com-
munication plays a major role.

The six workshops in this strand were as follows:

1. News Media as a Pro-Development Tool
2. Fighting Poverty—Community Media and Communication for

Development in the Digital Age
3. Implementing Communication for Development Thinking in

Southern Realities—Negotiating Politics, Profit, and Poverty
Toward Social Inclusion

4. Impact and Assessment—Innovative Ways to Determine
Communication Effectiveness

5. The Rationale, the Value, and the Challenges for Adopting
Participatory Communication in Development Programs

6. Which Kind of Development Communication Does Attract
Media?

5

Page 2

News Media as a Pro-Development Tool
Panelists had no doubts about the value added of the media covering
development issues. The discussion revolved instead around (a) why
this is so hard to achieve, (b) what civil society needs to understand
to get the news media to cover development, and (c) who needs to
take what roles in order for journalists to cover development stories
effectively.

KEY MEDIA TRENDS

1. The concentration of media ownership—In the United States,
there has been an acceleration of ownership of all media into
fewer private hands.

2. Segmentation—More and more different types of media are
targeted at different audiences (for example, cooking and travel
channels, the Internet, and satellite TV broadcasting).

3. The electronic media threaten the economic profitability of
the traditional media. NBC recently fired several thousand
employees in the United States.

4. There is ever-greater competition linked to time—always
to be first. This means less and less context, especially in
broadcast media.

5. In the developed world, 30–40 percent of young people are
getting their news not from traditional media but from the
Web and blogs.

6. We are witnessing the disappearance of the traditional
Anglo-Saxon journalist. Newsgathering is more ideological
than before. There used to be a clear boundary between
activism and journalism, but now the line is increasingly
blurred as there is less separation between news gathering
and editorial roles.

7. New sources are emerging: civil society is providing a new type
of expert. Civil society is more able to work with the media
than are governments: they understand journalists’ deadlines
and their need for expertise and legitimate sources.

8. While the media sector used to lag behind when it came
to adopting corporate social responsibility policies, this
is now changing; good examples are the BBC and Time
Warner.

88 W O R L D C O N G R E S S O N C O M M U N I C A T I O N F O R D E V E L O P M E N T

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(continued )

Keith

Jon
Anette

Jeannette
Susanne

Kevin Robert

Ellen

Jacek J.
Paul
Matthew
Peter

Ellen

Faria

Wheeler

White
Widholm Bolme

Wijnants
Willner

Wilson

Winters

Wojciechowicz
Wu
Wyatt
Young

Yount

Zaman

Chairman

Regional Adviser Culture and
Media Southern Africa and Sida
HIV/AIDS team

Country Manager
Program Manager, Pilot

Project Rioplus
Head of Communications

Presidential Management Fellow

Senior Communications Of�cer

Assistant President
International Director

Senior Adviser, Development
Outreach and Communications

IUCN Commis-
sion on
Education
and Commu-
nication

SIDA

Health Unlimited
GTZ

BBC World
Service Trust

U.S. Mission to
the UN Agen-
cies in Rome

World Bank
IFAD
IFAD
Adam Smith

International
USAID/MSI

World Food
Program

Gland

London
Lusaka

Kigali
Eschborn

London

Rome

Warsaw
Rome
Rome
London

Washington, DC

Rome

Switzerland

United Kingdom
Zambia

Rwanda
Germany

United Kingdom

Italy

Poland
Italy
Italy
United Kingdom

United States

Italy

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Full List of Participants (Continued )

Name Last Name Title Organization City Country

Elena

Arturo
Nicola
Tommaso
Jo
Silvana
Veruschka
Susan

Melanie

Alessandro

Zambelli

Zamora
Zamperini
Zanaica
Zaremba
Zeppieri
Zilvetti
Zimicki

Zipperer

Zurzolo

Sociologist

Project Organizer

Senior Technical Adviser

Senior Communication Officer,
Independent Evaluation Group

Ministry of
Foreign
Affairs of
Italy�DGCS

Regione Lazio
NGO Echos
Oxfam
Poste Italiane

Academy for
Educational
Development

World Bank

Bilancio

Rome

Managua
Rome
Brussels
London
Rome
Rome
Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Rome

Italy

Nicaragua
Italy
Belgium
United Kingdom
Italy
Italy
United States

United States

Italy

Participants, continued

Page 225

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Page 226

The first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in October 2006 in Rome,
was an unprecedented opportunity for dialogue among three key stakeholders who rarely
interact: policy makers, practitioners, and academicians. It aimed to highlight the necessity
of incorporating Communication for Development into development policies and practices.

Communication for Development is a multidisciplinary area of study and work that is based
on two-way models of communication, going beyond diffusion and dissemination of informa-
tion. Its functions range from engaging stakeholders in problem analysis and risk assessment
to supporting behavior and social change. The experiences recounted here are drawn from
the various sessions of the Congress and emphasize the value of using Communication for
Development to engage stakeholders in a professional and systematic manner for more
effective and sustainable project design and implementation.

ISBN 978-0-8213-7137-4

SKU 17137

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