Download Wilderness Survival for Dummies (ISBN - 0470453060) PDF

TitleWilderness Survival for Dummies (ISBN - 0470453060)
TagsFor Dummies
LanguageEnglish
File Size8.7 MB
Total Pages483
Table of Contents
                            Wilderness Survival For Dummies®
	Contents at a Glance
	Table of Contents
	Introduction
	Part I: Stayin’ Alive: Basic Wilderness Survival Principles
		Chapter 1: Surviving the Wilderness
			Being Prepared and Proactive
			Keeping the Right Attitude
			Identifying Survival Basics
			Navigating in the Wild
			Surviving Injury
			Avoiding Some of the Causes of Survival Situations
		Chapter 2: Preparing Yourself for a Survival Situation
			Being Ready for Mother Nature
			Carrying Survival Equipment
		Chapter 3: The Psychology of Survival: Gaining the Upper Hand
			Getting into the Right Mindset
			Being Aware of Your Emotions
			Improving Morale
		Chapter 4: Survival Style: KeepingWarm or Cool
			Regulating Body Temperature
			Relying on Layering for Warmth
			Improvising Cold-Weather Clothing
			Using Other Ways to Keep Warm
			Cool Threads: Clothing for Staying Cool
			A Cool Proposition: Working at Night, Resting During the Day
		Chapter 5: Making Fire in the Wilderness
			Making a Fire
			Trying Other Ways to Start Fire
			Extinguishing a Fire
		Chapter 6: Home, Sweet Hut: Survival Shelters
			Grasping the Importance of Shelter
			Before Making Camp: What to Do
			Using Natural Shelters
			Putting a Roof over Your Head: Building Simple Shelters
			Keeping Your Shelter Clean
		Chapter 7: Liquid Capital: Finding Drinking Water
			Knowing Your Water Needs
			What Not to Drink
			Finding Bodies of Water
			Catching Rain
			Collecting Condensation
			Extracting Water from Plants
			Filtering and Purifying Water
		Chapter 8: Gathering and Hunting to Stay Alive in theWilderness
			Managing Food in the Wild
			Including Plants in Your Wilderness Diet
			Hunting and Trapping Food
			Getting Your Hands on Freshwater Fish
			The Wilderness Café: Preparing Food Outdoors
	Part II: Eyeing Advanced Survival Techniques
		Chapter 9: Finding Your Way with Tools: Basic Wilderness Navigation
			Grasping Navigation Basics
			Map Reading Made Easy
			Navigating with a Map
			Understanding How Your Compass Works
			Navigating with a Map and Compass
			Navigating with a GPS Receiver
		Chapter 10: Looking Up to the Skies:Celestial Navigation
			Finding Direction with the Sun
			Finding Direction with the Stars
		Chapter 11: Trekking over Land
			Understanding Trail Travel
			Getting Back on Course When You’re Disoriented
			What to Do When You’re Lost
			Blazing Your Own Trail
			Crossing Obstacles in the Wild
		Chapter 12: Signaling for Rescue
			Grasping the Basics to Signaling
			Mastering the Language of Signaling
			Mastering Signaling Tools
			Signaling with Electronics
			Getting a Lift: What to Do When the Helicopter Comes
		Chapter 13: Administering First Aid
			Understanding First Aid Basics
			Controlling Bleeding
			Treating Shock
			Handling Breaks, Sprains, and Wounds
			Treating Burns
			Addressing Hypothermia and Dehydration
			Treating Bites, Stings, and Poisonings
		Chapter 14: Survive or Thrive? Advanced Methods and Tools
			Keeping It Together: Ropes and Knots
			Crafting Your Own Tools
			Making Natural Remedies
	Part III: Surviving in Extreme Land Environments
		Chapter 15: Special Considerations for Forests and Jungles
			Identifying Hazardous Wildlife in Dry Forests
			Laws of the Jungle: Surviving in the Tropics
			Identifying Dangerous Animals in the Tropics
		Chapter 16: The Big Chill: Enduring in Snowy Places
			Staying Warm
			Cold Comfort: Making Your Shelter in a Snowy Environment
			Making Fire in Cold, Snowy Environments
			Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow: Safe-to-Drink Snow and Ice
			Steering Clear of Cold-Environment Terrain Hazards
			Making Wearable Tools for Cold-Weather Survival
		Chapter 17: Staying Alive under the Sun
			Knowing the Dangers the Sun and Heat Pose
			Wearing Sun Shields
			Finding Shelter in the Desert
			Finding Water in the Desert
			Finding Food in the Dry Places
			Avoiding Dangerous Desert Animals
			Wind and Water: Watching Out for Desert Weather
			Finding Your Way in the Desert
			Crossing Desert Terrain
	Part IV: Surviving on the Seas, Oceans, and Great Lakes
		Chapter 18: Staying Afloat and Warm
			Recognizing When Your Vessel Is in Trouble
			Knowing What to Do If Your Boat Starts to Sink
			Staying Warm as You Float with a Life Jacket
			Floating without a Life Jacket
		Chapter 19: The Great Drift: Aboard Life Rafts and Disabled Vessels
			Getting from Ship to Life Raft
			Adjusting to Life Afloat
			Controlling Drifting Vessels
		Chapter 20: Food and Drink at Sea
			On the Water Front: Improving Your Chances for Survival
			Making Fresh Water on the Sea
			Considering Living Sources of Water
			Fishing at Sea
			Bringing in Your Catch
			Preparing and Eating Fish
			Identifying Other Delicious Things to Eat in the Sea
		Chapter 21: Emergency Travel and Navigation at Sea
			Swimming Back to Land
			Improvised Open-Sea Navigation for Life Rafts
			Coming Ashore: A Dangerous Ordeal
		Chapter 22: First Aid on the Water
			Responding to Water Casualties
			Treating Common Sea Ailments
			Treating Bites and Stings
	Part V: The Part of Tens
		Chapter 23: Ten Ways to Practice Wilderness Survival Skills
			Make a Fire with Two Matches
			Make a Fire with a Magnifying Glass
			Make a Fire with a Bow Drill
			Make a Flotation Device from Your Pants
			Find North with the Sky’s Help
			Make a Tripod
			Make a Bow and Arrow
			Make a Transpiration Bag
			Use a CD to Practice Signaling
			Practice CPR
		Chapter 24: Ten Quick Escapes
			Escaping a Sinking Car
			Escaping a Small Plane in Water
			Righting a Small Boat or Canoe
			Escaping a Forest Fire
			Escaping a Bee Swarm
			Surviving a Bear Encounter
			Encountering a Mountain Lion
			Surviving an Avalanche
			Surviving a Whiteout
			Getting Out of Quicksand
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

John Haslett
Expedition leader and adventure writer

Cameron M. Smith
Arctic explorer

• Use survival techniques to stay
alive on land or at sea

• Understand basic navigation

• Find enough water and food

• Signal for help and get rescued

Learn to:

Wilderness
Survival

Making Everythin
g Easier!



Open the book and find:

• Common survival scenarios you
may encounter

• Tried-and-tested advice for
individuals or groups

• The items you need to stay alive

• Basic orientation skills

• Ways to keep warm or cool

• The best methods for building a
fire in any environment

• What you can (and can’t) eat
and drink in the wild

• True stories of survival

John Haslett is a veteran expedition leader
and adventure writer whose articles have been
featured in National Geographic Adventure.
Cameron M. Smith is an archaeologist at
Portland State University. He has traveled
the world’s wildernesses in some of the most
unreasonable ways imaginable.

Nature/Outdoor Adventure

$19.99 US / $23.99 CN / £14.99 UK

ISBN 978-0-470-45306-3

Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step photos,

how-to articles, or to shop the store!

Your one-stop guide to
surviving and enjoying
the Great Outdoors
Want to know how to stay alive in extreme situations?
This practical, accurate guide gives you all the expert,
field-tested tools and techniques you need to survive.
Whether you find yourself lost in the woods, adrift on
a life raft, bitten by a snake, or needing shelter in cold
weather, this hands-on resource teaches you how to
stay safe (and sane), find rescue, and live to tell the tale!

• Know the basics of survival — perform life-saving
first aid, make fire and shelter, and find water
and food

• Manage your emotions — cope with panic and
anger, get the “survivor’s attitude,” and foster
cooperation and hope with others

• Increase your chances of rescue — signal for help
and navigate using a compass or the sky

• Practice expert survival methods — tie essential
knots, craft your own weapons and tools, and
make natural remedies

• Gain wisdom for water emergencies — stay
afloat when your ship or boat sinks, avoid
dehydration and starvation, and make it to shore

W
ild

ern
ess Su

rviva
l

Haslett
Smith

est. spine=.9600”

Page 241

Chapter 13: Administering First Aid 225
2. Locate the spot where you perform chest

compressions, and position your hands.

Place two fingers at the bottom of the person’s

breastbone and then place the heel of your hand

just above the fingers. Your hand should be near the

center of the person’s chest (see Figure 13-4a).

Place your other hand over your first and interlock your

fingers. The heels of both hands should now be aligned

as in Figure 13-4b. Make sure your hands are well above

the subject’s sternum (breastbone); otherwise, you’re

just pumping on the abdomen, which does no good.

3. Using a straight-armed stance and a steady, smooth

motion, lean forward to compress the breastbone

down about 2 inches (5 centimeters), and then come

back up, releasing pressure (see Figure 13-4c).

You should try to do compressions at a rate of slightly

more than one per second. A good way to do this is to

count “one and two and three and four” and so on.

4. After every 15 compressions, pinch the person’s nos-

trils together and give two slow breaths (Figure 13-4d).

The whole cycle of 15 compressions and two breaths

should take you about 15 seconds.

a

b

c

d

Figure 13-4: Administering CPR.

Continue CPR until the person resuscitates (check the person’s

pulse and breathing on occasion) or until you’re unable to

continue. Keep at it as long as you can. In some cases of

cold-water immersion or other causes of hypothermia,

prolonged CPR has proved successful if the subject was also

warmed during CPR.

at

n
il

ed

om-

lts:

Page 242

Part II: Eyeing Advanced Survival Techniques 226









Controlling Bleeding
When an accident occurs, you can expect to see one or more

of the three types of bleeding:

✓ Capillary: This is usually superficial bleeding from tiny
blood vessels near the skin.

✓ Venous: This bleeding comes from the veins, the blood
vessels that return blood to the heart. It’s characterized

by a steady flow of dark red or maroon colored blood.

✓ Arterial: This is potentially the most dangerous type of
bleeding, and it’s characterized by spurts of bright red

blood.

This section shows you how to control visible bleeding. Signs

of internal bleeding include blood in the urine (though other

things can result in bloody urine) or a blue or red discoloration

in the skin, but this kind of injury can’t be treated without

surgery.

Treating capillary and
venous bleeding
Capillary and venous bleeding are the two most common

types of bleeding. You can control them in the following four

basic ways. Think of these techniques as a system, not just

individual methods that you have to perform separately.

✓ Direct pressure: Apply pressure directly to the wound
with a bandage, with some other type of cloth, or with

your hand if you have nothing else. Apply pressure for

10 to 15 minutes or more, and resist the urge to look at

the wound during that time. If the bleeding doesn’t stop,

keep up the pressure for an additional 15 minutes and

consider applying indirect pressure to a pressure point.



If you need to continue applying pressure but are unable

to do so manually, you can apply a pressure bandage.

For more on applying a pressure bandage, see “Cleaning

and covering wounds,” later in this chapter.

Page 482

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Page 483

John Haslett
Expedition leader and adventure writer

Cameron M. Smith
Arctic explorer

• Use survival techniques to stay
alive on land or at sea

• Understand basic navigation

• Find enough water and food

• Signal for help and get rescued

Learn to:

Wilderness
Survival

Making Everythin
g Easier!



Open the book and find:

• Common survival scenarios you
may encounter

• Tried-and-tested advice for
individuals or groups

• The items you need to stay alive

• Basic orientation skills

• Ways to keep warm or cool

• The best methods for building a
fire in any environment

• What you can (and can’t) eat
and drink in the wild

• True stories of survival

John Haslett is a veteran expedition leader
and adventure writer whose articles have been
featured in National Geographic Adventure.
Cameron M. Smith is an archaeologist at
Portland State University. He has traveled
the world’s wildernesses in some of the most
unreasonable ways imaginable.

Nature/Outdoor Adventure

$19.99 US / $23.99 CN / £14.99 UK

ISBN 978-0-470-45306-3

Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step photos,

how-to articles, or to shop the store!

Your one-stop guide to
surviving and enjoying
the Great Outdoors
Want to know how to stay alive in extreme situations?
This practical, accurate guide gives you all the expert,
field-tested tools and techniques you need to survive.
Whether you find yourself lost in the woods, adrift on
a life raft, bitten by a snake, or needing shelter in cold
weather, this hands-on resource teaches you how to
stay safe (and sane), find rescue, and live to tell the tale!

• Know the basics of survival — perform life-saving
first aid, make fire and shelter, and find water
and food

• Manage your emotions — cope with panic and
anger, get the “survivor’s attitude,” and foster
cooperation and hope with others

• Increase your chances of rescue — signal for help
and navigate using a compass or the sky

• Practice expert survival methods — tie essential
knots, craft your own weapons and tools, and
make natural remedies

• Gain wisdom for water emergencies — stay
afloat when your ship or boat sinks, avoid
dehydration and starvation, and make it to shore

W
ild

ern
ess Su

rviva
l

Haslett
Smith

est. spine=.9600”

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