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Table of Contents
                            UNSCEAR 2008 Report - Annex D
Contents - Annex D
	Corrigendum
	I. Introduction
	II. Physical and environmental context
	III. Radiation doses to exposed population groups
	IV. Attribution of health effects to radiation exposure
	V. Early health effects
	VI. Late health effects
	VII. General conclusions
	ACKNOWLEDG EMENTS
	Appendix A. Physical and environmental context
	Appendix B. Radiation doses to exposed population groups
	Appendix C. Early health effects
	Appendix D. Late health effects
	References
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

NOTE

The report of the Committee without its annexes appears as �������� �������� ��� ���� ��������

������
, Sixty-third Session, Supplement No. 46.

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do not imply
the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations
concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning
the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

The country names used in this document are, in most cases, those that were in use at the time the
data were collected or the text prepared. In other cases, however, the names have been updated,
where this was possible and appropriate, to reflect political changes.

UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION

Sales No. E.11.IX.3

ISBN-13: 978-92-1-142280-1

e-ISBN-13: 978-92-1-054482-5

© United Nations, April 2011. All rights reserved.

Publishing production: English, Publishing and Library Section, United Nations Office
at Vienna.

Page 89

ANNEX D: HEALTH EFFECTS DUE TO RADIATION FROM THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT 129

City or oblast Average thyroid dose (mGy) Population
(persons)

Collective dose
(man Gy)

Pre-school
children

School
children

Adolescents Adults Total

Minsk 22.9 11.8 7.1 7.4 9.6 1 509 060 14 530

Mogilev 97.6 51.0 29.4 30.7 40.1 1 248 560 50 020

Rounded total or average for entire
country

122 63 37 37 49 9 686 000 476 000

Rounded total or average for
“contaminated areas”a

449 210 135 138 182 1 770 000 322 000

Russian Federation (19 affected regionsb)

Bryansk 155 52 31 26 42 1 429 000 60 500

Tula 44 14 8 6 10 1 796 000 18 700

Orel 58 19 12 9 15 860 000 13 000

Kaluga 13 4 3 2 3 1 006 000 3 500

Other 15 “affected” regionsa 10 3 2 2 3 32 134 000 94 000

Rounded total or average for entire
19 regions

18 6 4 3 5 37 225 000 190 000

Rounded total or average for
“contaminated areas”a

107 35 20 17 27 2 474 000 68 000

Ukraine

Vinnytsia 37 13 9.8 9.2 12 1 953 000 23 900

Volyn’ 87 33 25 21 31 1 047 000 32 000

Luhans’k 12 4.0 3.1 3.1 4.1 2 832 000 11 600

Dnipropetrovs’k 13 4.4 3.4 3.4 4.5 3 810 000 17 200

Donets’k 24 8.0 6.0 6.1 8.1 5 328 000 42 900

Zhytomyr 231 87 67 60 81 1 549 000 126 200

Zakarpattia 7.6 2.8 2.1 1.8 2.7 1 203 000 3 200

Zaporizhzhia 26 8.8 6.2 6.5 8.8 2 045 000 17 900

Ivano-Frankivs’k 19 7.1 5.3 4.6 6.7 1 375 000 9 200

Kyiv 202 75 58 53 71 1 882 000 133 600

Kirovohrad 89 31 23 23 30 1 233 000 37 300

Crimea 34 12 8.8 8.4 12 2 005 000 23 200

L’viv 14 4.9 3.8 3.5 4.8 2 671 000 12 900

Mykolaiv 20 7.1 5.4 5.0 7.0 1 301 000 9 100

Odesa 15 5.2 3.8 3.7 5.1 2 656 000 13 600

poltava 54 19 15 13 18 1 732 000 30 500

Rivne 177 64 49 42 62 1 162 000 71 700

Sumy 71 25 19 19 24 1 425 000 34 800

Ternopil’ 18 6.4 4.8 4.5 6.2 1 150 000 7 100

Kharkiv 26 8.7 6.5 6.6 8.6 3 163 000 27 300

Kherson 30 11 7.8 7.3 10 1 222 000 12 500

Khmel’nyts’k 39 15 11 10 14 1 528 000 20 900

Cherkasy 142 52 39 37 49 1 522 000 74 300

Chernivtsi 40 14 10 9.3 13 914 000 12 200

Chernihiv 151 55 43 37 50 1 427 000 70 900

Page 90

130 UNSCEAR 2008 REPORT: VOLUME II

City or oblast Average thyroid dose (mGy) Population
(persons)

Collective dose
(man Gy)

Pre-school
children

School
children

Adolescents Adults Total

Kyiv city 94 30 23 24 32 2 469 000 80 000

Sevastopol’ city 56 18 14 14 19 381 000 7 300

Rounded total or average for entire
country 55 20 15 14 19 50 986 000 963 300

Rounded total or average for
“contaminated areas”a 367 115 115 91 123 2 151 000 265 000

Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine combined

Rounded total or average for three
countries

48 19 13 12 16 97 900 000 1 630 000

Rounded total or average for
“contaminated areas”a

289 110 84 75 102 6 395 000 655 000

a The “contaminated” areas were defined arbitrarily in the former Soviet Union as areas where the 137Cs levels on soil were greater than 37 kBq/m2.
b Belgorod, Kursk, Leningrad, Lipetsk, Nizhny Novgorod, penza, Ryazan, Saratov, Smolensk, Tambov, Ulyanovsk and Voronezh oblasts, Chuvash, Mordoviya and Tatar autonomous

republics.

Table B11. distribution of the affected populations of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine according to age and
thyroid dose interval [K8, L4, Z4]

Dose interval
(Gy)

Pre-school children School children Adolescents Adults Total population

Number
(persons)

% Number
(persons)

% Number
(persons)

% Number
(persons)

% Number
(persons)

%

Belarusa

<0.05 574 300 54.3 836 300 74.9 433 900 81.2 5 680 100 81.4 7 524 600 77.7

0.05–0.1 223 300 21.1 99 800 8.9 41 300 7.7 463 100 6.6 827 500 8.5

0.1–0.2 88 000 8.3 82 700 7.4 43 100 8.1 617 800 8.9 831 600 8.6

0.2–0.5 113 800 10.8 78 800 7.1 14 400 2.7 182 800 2.6 389 800 4.0

0.5–1.0 40 300 3.8 16 400 1.5 1 900 0.4 31 800 0.5 90 400 0.9

1.0–2.0 17 800 1.7 2 500 0.2 20 0.004 300 0.004 20 620 0.2

2.0–5.0 1 000 0.1 100 0.01 — — — — 1 100 0.01

≥ 5.0 50 0.01 5 4 × 10-4 — — — — 55 6 × 10-4

Rounded total or
average

1 058 550 100 1 116 605 100 534 620 100 6 975 900 100 9 686 000 100

Russian Federation (19 affected regionsb)

< 0.05 3 483 000 92.0 3 921 000 98.7 1 860 000 99.5 27 515 000 99.7 36 779 000 98.8

0.05–0.1 206 000 5.4 36 000 0.9 5 800 0.3 50 000 0.2 297 800 0.8

0.1–0.2 68 000 1.8 10 000 0.3 2 300 0.1 28 000 0.1 108 300 0.3

0.2–0.5 23 000 0.6 4 000 0.1 500 0.03 5 500 0.02 33 000 0.1

0.5–1.0 4 000 0.1 400 0.01 100 0.005 1 100 0.004 5 600 0.02

1.0–2.0 1 200 0.03 20 0.001 — — — — 1 220 0.003

2.0–5.0 100 0.003 — — — — — — 100 3 × 10-4

>5.0 20 5 × 10-4 — — — — — — 20 5 × 10-5

Rounded total or
average

3 785 320 100 3 971 420 100 1 868 700 100 27 599 600 100 37 225 040 100

Page 178

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