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UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

GRADUATE COLLEGE





A COMPARISON OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND PERSONALITY

FACTORS: TWO CONCEPTS OR ONE?





A DISSERTATION

SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE FACULTY

in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the

degree of

Doctor of Philosophy









By

ELIZABETH MARIA FREELAND
Norman, Oklahoma

2007

Page 2

UMI Number: 3257385

3257385

2007

Copyright 2007 by

Freeland, Elizabeth Maria

UMI Microform

Copyright
All rights reserved. This microform edition is protected against
unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code.

ProQuest Information and Learning Company
300 North Zeeb Road

P.O. Box 1346
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346

All rights reserved.

by ProQuest Information and Learning Company.

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Factor
Low End

Descriptor 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
High End
Descriptor

A Warmth* Reserved X Warm
B Reasoning Concrete X Abstract

C Emotional Stability Reactive X
Emotionally
Stable

E Dominance Deferential X Dominant
F Liveliness Serious X Lively
G Rule Consciousness Expedient X Rule-Conscious
H Social Boldness Shy X Socially Bold
I Sensitivity Utilitarian X Sensitive
L Vigilance Trusting X Vigilant
M Abstractedness Grounded X Abstracted
N Privateness Forthright X Private
O Apprehension Self-Assured X Apprehensive

Q1
Openness to
Change Traditional X Open to Change

Q2 Self-Reliance Group-Oriented X Self-Reliant

Q3 Perfectionism
Tolerates
Disorder X Perfectionistic

Q4 Tension Relaxed X Tense
* Italicized factors coordinate with findings reviewed by Bar-On (2000)


Figure 1. Theoretical 16PF Profile of an Emotionally Intelligent Individual



intelligence is the more accurate one, and at what point does overlap of emotional

intelligence concepts with factors of personality become too much?

It was the aim of the current study to examine this threshold and determine what

emotional competencies are related to established personality factors. Important to this

discussion is the question of whether the EQ-i and MSCEIT are each measuring a

construct unique and separate from personality. Based on evidence from previous

research, it was expected that results from each emotional intelligence instrument would

demonstrate different correlations with results from the personality measure, thus

suggesting that they measure different concepts. Given the lack of research comparing

instruments that purport to measure emotional intelligence against each other, a

significant goal of this study was to provide data on the comparison of the MSCEIT and

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the EQ-i. It was also expected that the EQ-i results would be more closely related to the

16PF results indicating that there is a more similar relationship between the concept the

EQ-i measures and personality than with the concept the MSCEIT measures and

personality.

Research Question One. What is the relationship between emotional intelligence

competencies or abilities and personality factors?

Research Question Two. Do the EQ-i and MSCEIT measure something new and

unique from established personality traits?

Research Question Three. Is there convergent validity between the two measures

of emotional intelligence (the EQ-i and MSCEIT)?

Matthews et al. (2004) stated that, due to the relative newness of the study of

emotional intelligence, few studies have examined group differences in emotional

intelligence. Therefore, an additional aim of the current study was to evaluate group

differences based on gender.

Research Question Four. Are there any differences between males and females in

emotional intelligence competencies or abilities?

Given the use of the 16PF in career counseling and development (Cattell, 2001;

Stanton & Matthews, 1995), personnel selection and development, and team building

(Stanton & Matthews, 1995), as well similar uses for emotional intelligence (Cherniss &

Goleman, 2001; Goleman, 1998; Goleman et al., 2002), the researcher investigated the

specific predictive relationship between the 16 factors and Bar-On’s emotional

intelligence subscales. Due to the use of sten (“standardized ten”) scores in the scoring of

the 16PF (Cattell, 2001), each person is represented by an iceberg-like profile that gives a

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APPENDIX B: Variable List and Abbreviations

Abbreviation Scale

16PF Subscales

A_PF Warmth
B_PF Reasoning
C_PF Emotional stability
E_PF Dominance
F_PF Liveliness
G_PF Rule-consciousness
H_PF Social boldness
I_PF Sensitivity
L_PF Vigilance
M_PF Abstractedness
N_PF Privateness
O_PF Apprehension
Q1_PF Openness to change
Q2_PF Self-reliance
Q3_PF Perfectionism
Q4_PF Tension

16PF Global Scales

Extraversion Extraversion
Anxiety Anxiety
Tough_mind Tough Mindedness
Independence Independence
Self_control Self Control

MSCEIT Global Scales

Perceiving Perceiving Emotions
Facilitating Facilitating Thought
Understanding Understanding Emotions
Managing Managing Emotions

tot_MSCEIT Total MSCEIT Score

EQ-i Subscales

es Emotional Self-Awareness
as Assertiveness
sr Self-Regard
sa Self-Actualization

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APPENDIX B: Variable List and Abbreviations cont.

EQ-i Subscales cont.

in Independence
em Empathy
ir Interpersonal Relationship
re Social Responsibility
ps Problem Solving
rt Reality Testing
fl Flexibility
st Stress Tolerance
ic Impulse Control
ha Happiness
op Optimism
pi Positive Impression
ni Negative Impression

EQ-i Global Scales

raeq Intrapersonal Composite
ereq Interpersonal Composite
adeq Adaptability Composite
smeq Stress Management Composite
gmeq General Mood Composite

tot_eq Total EQ-i Score

Other Variables

gender Gender
age Age
ethn Ethnicity

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