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TitleUniversal Periodic Review - First cycle
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages122
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Universal
periodic
review
first cycle

reporting methodologies
from the position of
the state, civil society
and national hUman rights
institUtions

disseminated throUgh

the Universal periodic review is still a new mechanism.

this publication gathers experience and best practices from

states, nhris and civil society organizations during the first Upr

cycle. improved implementation of human rights on the ground

remains the focus of the Upr as well as of this publication.

hopefully, the proposed methodologies, cases and examples can

contribute to continued strengthening of the Upr mechanism

as the only universal tool for promoting and protecting human

rights. the involvement of the citizens at large and constructive

dialogue among all stakeholders is key to this end. we hope this

publication can give useful inspiration in this regard.

Page 2

UNIVERSAL
PERIODIC
REVIEW
FIRST CYCLE

REPORTING METHODOLOGIES
FROM THE POSITION OF
THE STATE, CIVIL SOCIETY
AND NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS
INSTITUTIONS

Page 61

60

IV. THE ROLE OF NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS INSTITUTIONS

the issues that give rise to the most
serious concerns should be addressed.
The NHRI should be in dialogue with
NGOs to avoid overlapping on issues
and contradictory assessments. Also
the NHRI should be able to facilitate
and coordinate discussions with NGOs,
to call to meetings and provide general
guidelines on structure, deadlines,
style and content of the NGO reports.
A strategy for submission of individual
and joint submissions (coalitions) could
be developed with assistance from
the NHRI. The NHRI could encourage
joint submissions using concerns and
recommendations already formulated
for treaty bodies. Also NGOs lacking
the required resources to participate
more actively in the process could be
approached by the NHRI for their input
to the report. Technical assistance,
guidance and qualitative review on
NGO reports could be offered as a
service.

In addition, the liaison officer at the
NHRI could monitor the process of
drafting the state UPR report and
regularly inform (e.g. by e-mail) the

NGOs on any development, progress
or obstacles in the process.

Unfortunately, the stakeholder reports
have their deadline before submission
of the National Report. It is therefore
suggested that the NHRI attempts to
ensure that topics not expected to be
covered by the state report are covered
by civil society organizations or the
NHRI stakeholder report.
The NHRI stakeholder report should
prioritize between the seven reporting
areas mentioned above, and ideally
supplement the state and other
civil society stakeholder reports by
reporting on areas not covered. If the
state for instance is expected to focus
on best practice and other positive
aspects of the domestic human
rights situation while the NGOs focus
on key national priorities, the NHRI
might consider reporting on main
recommendations for improving the
normative and institutional human
rights framework. By being in contact
with state representatives and civil
society organizations, the NHRI will
be able to ensure that all seven points

Page 62

61

iv. the role of national hUman rights institUtions

to some extend are covered in the
reports.

the nhri could attempt to ensure
that the following areas are touched
upon in the collected reports:

1. equality and non-discrimination
2. civil and political rights and

fundamental freedoms
3. personal liberties and security
4. torture, and other cruel, inhuman

or degrading treatment or
punishment

5. administration of justice
6. esc rights (health, housing,

education, work, social security…)
7. women’s rights and gender

equality
8. children’s rights
9. promotion and protection of the

rights of specific groups, including:
migrants, people with disabilities,
minorities, indigenous peoples etc.

it should, however, also be noted that
Upr reporting offers possibilities not
available in treaty body reporting.
treaty body reporting covers the

treaties ratified by the state and only
cover one specific convention. the
broad and holistic focus of the Upr
enables the stakeholder reports to
include recommendations to ratify
new conventions or focus on overall
topics or topics only indirectly covered
by other Un treaties (e.g. human
rights and business or the rights of
imprisoned or detained persons).
furthermore, repetition of treaty body
recommendations should also be
kept to a minimum since these will be
reflected in the compilation of treaty
body recommendations.

When?
the deadline for submitting
stakeholder reports during the first
Upr cycle is six month before the
state is scheduled to be reviewed in
geneva. the state needs to submit
the national report 6 to 13 weeks
before the review. consequently, the
stakeholders are sometimes engaged
in the preparation of the reporting
before the state. the stakeholders
are likely to start their preparations
at least 12 months before the review,

Page 122

Universal
periodic
review
first cycle

reporting methodologies
from the position of
the state, civil society
and national hUman rights
institUtions

disseminated throUgh

the Universal periodic review is still a new mechanism.

this publication gathers experience and best practices from

states, nhris and civil society organizations during the first Upr

cycle. improved implementation of human rights on the ground

remains the focus of the Upr as well as of this publication.

hopefully, the proposed methodologies, cases and examples can

contribute to continued strengthening of the Upr mechanism

as the only universal tool for promoting and protecting human

rights. the involvement of the citizens at large and constructive

dialogue among all stakeholders is key to this end. we hope this

publication can give useful inspiration in this regard.

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