Download UK Household Energy Survey - Light Bulb Clarity: New Electric PDF

TitleUK Household Energy Survey - Light Bulb Clarity: New Electric
LanguageEnglish
File Size5.6 MB
Total Pages600
Table of Contents
                            SUMMARY
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION
GLOSSARY
	1 Household Recruitment
		1.1 Recruitment methodology
		1.2 Sample structure
		1.2.1 Sampling
		1.2.2 Exclusions from the sample
		1.2.3 Demographic quotas
		1.2.4 Drop-out rates
		1.2.5 Sample profile
		1.3 Attitudinal questionnaire
		1.3.1 Pro-environmental segments
		1.3.2 Views towards climate change
		1.3.3 Environmental behaviour
		1.4 Ownership of electrical appliances
	2 Monitoring Methodology
		2.1 The measurement systems
		2.2 The serial wattmeter
		2.3 The Multivoies system
		2.4 The thermometer
	3 Electricians and Installation Activities
	4 Energy Performance Certificates
		4.1 EPC background
		4.2 Data collection method
		4.3 Points to note from method
		4.4 Comparison of results to national average
		4.5 Suggestions for future analysis
	5 Diaries for User Habits Survey
		5.1 Diaries
	All households were asked to complete simple diaries for some of the products that were monitored. The purpose of the diaries was to identify the most common programme settings used so that the energy consumption of those programmes can be characteris...
	The data from the forms were entered into a spreadsheet for compilation into the project database. No analysis was undertaken for this report and suggestions for data analysis appear in Appendix V.
	6 Treatment of Collected Data
	7 Results – General Electricity Consumption
		7.1. Total annualised household electricity consumption
		7.2 Maximum power demand drawn by the households
		7.3 Cumulative frequencies of power demands, from the grid point of view
			Terraced house – small (up to 70 m²)
		7.4 Structure of the average hourly load curve
		7.4.1 All households
		7.4.2 Specific analysis for the winter period
		7.5 Relative contribution of the different loads
		7.5.1 All households
		7.6 Comparison of highest and lowest electricty usage
	8 Summary of Appliances Results
	9 Results for Cold Domestic Appliances
		9.1 Seasonality effect
		9.2 Average ownership of appliances
		9.3 Refrigerators
		9.4 Fridge-freezers
		9.6 Chest freezers
		9.6.1 Hourly load curve
		9.7 Cold appliances summary
	10 Results for Laundry, Dishwashing and Cleaning Appliances
		10.1 Seasonality effect
		10.2 WASHING MACHINES
		10.3 Washer dryers
		10.4 Clothes dryers
		10.5 Dishwashers
	11 Results for Cooking Appliances
		11.1 Seasonality effect
		11.2 Annualised consumptions
		11.4 Hourly load curve
		11.5 Ovens
		11.6 Cookers
		11.7 Electric hob
		11.8 Microwave ovens
		11.9 Electric kettles
		11.10  Summary of cooking
		11.11  Other cooking appliances
	12 Results for Lighting
		12.1 Characteristics of lighting
			12.1.1 Number of light sources per type
		12.1.2 Number of light sources per m2
		12.1.3 Distribution of the number of bulbs per room and per type of light source
		12.2 Analysis of the installed lighting wattage
			12.2.1 Installed wattage per type of light source
		12.2.2 Installed wattage per type of room
		12.2.3 Total installed wattage per m²
		12.2.4 Installed wattage per type of source and per m²
		12.3 Annualised lighting consumption
		12.3.1 Seasonality effect
		12.3.2 Annualised consumption per household
			12.3.3 Discussion of highest and lowest lighting consumption
			12.3.4 Annualised consumption per person
		12.3.5 Annualised consumption per m2
		12.4 Average hourly lighting load per type of household
	13 Results for Audiovisual Equipment
		13.1 Seasonality effect
		13.2 Annualised consumption
		13.3 Annual consumption per person
		13.4 Hourly load curve per type of household
		13.5 Standby consumption
		13.6 Televisions
		13.6.1 Annualised consumptions
		13.6.2 Structure of the average hourly load curve
		13.6.3 Standby power analysis
		13.7 Other audiovisual appliances
	14 Results for Computer Equipment
		14.1 Annualised consumption
		14.2 Hourly load curve
		14.3 Standby mode consumption
		14.4 Analysis per type of equipment
	15 Results for Space Heating and Water Heating
		15.1 Seasonality effect
		15.2 Heating and water heating average consumption
		Annual consumption
		Annual consumption per m²
		Annual consumption per person
		15.3 Hourly load curve
		Heating
		Water heating
		15.4 Analysis by type of equipment
	16  Other Appliances
	17 Analysis of Standby Power
		17.1 Definition of terms
		17.2 General methodology
		17.3 Standby power demand
	18  Assessment of Potential Electricity Savings
		18.1 Domestic cold consumption
		18.2 Lighting
		18.3 Washing and drying
		18.4 Audiovisual site
		18.5 Computer site
		18.6 Potential energy saving per type of household
	19 Conclusions and Recommendations
	20 References
All values in kWh/year
                        
Document Text Contents
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This report is for the exclusive use of Intertek's Client and is provided pursuant to the agreement between Intertek and its Client. Intertek's
responsibility and liability are limited to the terms and conditions of the agreement. Intertek assumes no liability to any party, other than to the
Client in accordance with the agreement, for any loss, expense or damage occasioned by the use of this report. Only the Client is authorized to
permit copying or distribution of this report and then only in its entirety. Any use of the Intertek name or one of its marks for the sale or
advertisement of the tested material, product or service must first be approved in writing by Intertek. The observations and test results in this
report are relevant only to the sample tested. This report by itself does not imply that the material, product, or service is or has ever been under
an Intertek certification program. Taken on its own, this report should not be used for regulatory purposes e.g. declaring conformance with
directives.

R66141 Final Report Issue 4
Household Electricity Survey
A study of domestic electrical
product usage





REPORT




Client: Tim Lineham
AEA group
The Gemini Building
Fermi Avenue
Harwell Oxford
Didcot
OX11 0QR



Report
issued by:


Intertek Testing & Certification Ltd
Davy Avenue
Knowlhill
Milton Keynes
MK5 8NL

Tel. +44 (0)1908 857777
Fax. +44 (0)1908 857830






AUTHORISED
FOR ISSUE: .....................................................................…….. Wendy Brown

Business Stream Manager


DATE: May 2012


REPORT AUTHORS: Jean-Paul Zimmermann (Enertech)
Matt Evans (Ipsos MORI)
Jonathan Griggs (Griggs Surveys)
Nicola King (Intertek)
Les Harding (AEA Technology)
Penelope Roberts (AEA Technology)
Chris Evans (Consumer Expertise)









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11 Results for Cooking Appliances

11.1 Seasonality effect
The consumption of cooking appliances is seasonal, but most of the households were only
monitored for one month. The seasonality effect was calculated using the 26 households that
were monitored for one year. For each household, the weekly consumption was calculated by
adding all the data per week. The result consists of 52 values per household corresponding to the
number of weeks in one year. This set of 52 values was then normalised to 1 (calculating the
average for the 52 values gives a value of 1). An average value per week was then calculated
using all the data sets. Figure 413 represents the seasonality curve calculated by this method.
This curve was used to calculate the annual consumption for the appliances monitored for one
month. All the cooking appliances found in the kitchen were included in the calculation (oven,
cooker, hob, microwave oven, kettle, fryer and toaster). They were added together to obtain a
total cooking consumption per household.



Figure 413 Cooking – Seasonality effect

11.2 Annualised consumptions
The two highest consuming appliances present in the family of cooking appliances are the oven
and/or the kitchen stove. Figure 414 to Figure 418 show the annual consumption per type of
household for all the cooking. The average annual consumption ranged from 429 kWh to 505
kWh, with an average for all households of 460 kWh.

Cooking
Seasonality effect on the consumption

0.0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

1.4

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51

Weeks

ENERTECH INTERTEK

DEFRA, DECC, EST

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Cooking
Annual consumption

0

200

400

600

800

1 000

1 200

1 400

1 600

Households

A
n
n
u
a
l c

o
n
su

m
p
tio

n
(

kW
h
)

Average: 429 kWh/year

ENERTECH INTERTEK

DEFRA, DECC, EST

Single pensioner household (65+ years old)


Figure 414 Cooking – Annual consumption – Single pensioner household (65+ years old)




Cooking
Annual consumption

0

200

400

600

800

1 000

1 200

1 400

1 600

Households

A
n
n
u
a
l c

o
n
su

m
p
tio

n
(

kW
h
)

Average: 505 kWh/year

ENERTECH INTERTEK

DEFRA, DECC, EST

Single non-pensioner household


Figure 415 Cooking – Annual consumption – Single non- pensioner household

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chest freezers, 260
clothes dryers, 280, 283, 287
computer sites, 374, 375, 380
cooking appliances, 301, 305, 326
dishwashers, 290, 294, 299
fridge-freezers, 252
lighting, 337, 344, 345
loads, contribution of different, 222–24
power demand, cumulative frequency, 179–

80
power demand, maximum, 151–52
refrigerators, 248
savings potential, 412, 413
upright freezers, 256
washing machines, 265, 269, 273
with additional electric heating, 199, 200,

223, 224
without additional electric heating, 198, 199,

222, 223
Sky boxes (set-top boxes), 519, 520
small cooking appliances, 470–83

bottle warmers, 472
bread makers, 473, 474
coffee machines, 475, 476
extractor hoods, 477
food mixers, 478
food steamers, 479
fryers, 480
grills, 481
toasters, 482
yoghurt makers, 483

smoke detectors, 588
Sony Playstation 2, 501, 502
Sony Playstation 3, 503, 504
space heating, 388–90
speakers, 521, 522
standby consumption

aerials, 487
audiovisual equipment, 360–61
Blu-ray players, 490
breadmakers, 474
CD players, 492
coffee machines, 476
computer sites, 386
CRTs, 368, 369
DVD recorders, 494
DVD+VCRs, 498
DVDs, 496
games consoles, 500
hi-fi units, 512
home cinema (sound amplifiers), 514
LCDs, 370

Microsoft Xbox, 510
Microsoft Xbox 360, 508
Nintendo Wii, 506
plasma, 371, 372
radios, 516
set-top boxes, 518
Sky box (set-top boxes), 520
Sony Playstation 2, 502
Sony Playstation 3, 504
speakers, 522
televisions, 372
televisions monitored with other products,

525, 528, 530
VCRs, 533

standby power, 396–97
sterilsers, 589
sunbeds, 590

television boosters, 523
televisions, 362–72

annual consumption, 362
CRTs, 362, 364, 365, 368, 369
LCDs, 362, 365, 366, 370
plasma, 362, 366, 367, 371, 372

televisions monitored with other products,
524–31

terraced houses, end-terrace
annual consumption, 86–89
power demand, cumulative frequency, 166–

67
power demand, maximum, 139–40

terraced houses, medium/large (above 70 m²)
annual consumption, 94
power demand, cumulative frequency, 170
power demand, maximum, 143

terraced houses, mid-terrace
annual consumption, 82–85
power demand, cumulative frequency, 164–

65
power demand, maximum, 137–38

terraced houses, small (up to 70 m²)
annual consumption, 90–93
power demand, cumulative frequency, 168–

69
power demand, maximum, 141–42

toasters, 482
trouser presses, 592
tumble dryers. see clothes dryers

upright freezers, 256–59, 400, 401

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vacuum cleaners, 592
VCRs, 532, 533
video senders, 534
vivariums, 593

washer dryers, 275–79
washing machines, 265–73, 406
water heating, 388, 389, 392, 393

wet domestic appliances, 264–96, 406–8, see
also clothes dryers; dishwashers; washer
dryers; washing machines
cycles per year, 273
savings potential, 406–8
seasonality effect, 264

winter heating, 213–16

yoghurt makers, 483

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