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Table of Contents
                            Transforming the FBI:Roadmap to an EffectiveHuman Capital Program
FOREWORD
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACRONYMS
SCOPE AND METHODOLOGY
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Section I: Roadmap of Next Steps
	1. Appoint a Human Capital Implementation Team
	2. Create a Chief Human Capital Offiice and Officer
	3. Develop a Strategic Workforce Planning and Staffing Process
	4. Establish a Leaddership Development and Succession Planning Program
	5. Develop a Communications and Employee Involvement Strategy
	6. Increase Priority for Information Technology Support to Human Capital Programs
	7. Address Hiring Issues
	8. Initiate a Comprehensive Pay and Compensation Study
	9. Develop a Structured Career Development and Training Program
	10. Provide Consistent Work-Life Policies and Programs
Section II:  The Bureau's Human Capital Challenges
	Human Capital Infrastructure
	Strategic Workforce Planning
	Recruiting and Hiring
	Succession Planning and Leadership Development
	Career Development and Training
	Work-Life Programs
SUMMARY
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Transforming the FBI:
Roadmap to an Effective Human Capital Program

A Report by a Panel of the

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
for the U.S. Congress and the Federal Bureau of Investigation

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

September 2005

Page 2

A Panel Report by the

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

for the U.S. Congress and the Federal Bureau of Investigation




September 2005


TRANSFORMING THE FBI:

Roadmap to an Effective

Human Capital Program






Panel
Dick Thornburgh, Chair*

Melissa J. Allen*
Robert M. Alloway*

Frank J. Chellino
Floyd I. Clarke
Martin C. Faga*

Edward A. Flynn*
Kristine M. Marcy*

* Academy Fellow

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individual set of responsibilities and concerns. For example, the communications approach and
content appropriate for executives will be quite different from the approach and content of
communications for technical experts. The FBI has not yet developed these mechanisms.

Coordination of Studies and Consultants

The Bureau has engaged numerous consultants to provide assistance with a variety of strategic
and operational issues. According to a senior Bureau official, the FBI has approximately 60
different contractors “on the rolls.” These include:


The RAND Corporation providing technical assistance to SES succession planning;


Booz Allen Hamilton engaged in a number of activities, including a review of the hiring
process, assistance to the FBI Training Academy at Quantico in delivering training for
ICS personnel, and an analysis of the facilities needs of the Training Academy;


Logistics Management Institute and GRA, Inc involved in mapping the current human

capital work processes, proposing future processes, and analyzing a sample of personnel
actions to check for accuracy and completeness;


Hewitt Associates conducting a 60-day review of the human capital structure and other

human resource issues;

Emerson Human Capital designing Directorate of Intelligence competencies and career

paths;


OPM helping the Intelligence Directorate exercise critical pay position authorities; and


Ninth House engaged to create a distance-learning program on criminal intelligence that
will be made available to FBI staff as well as state and local law enforcement officials.


While all of these activities may be helpful, they are not well organized. There is no systematic
plan for identifying the assistance needed, selecting well qualified contractors, involving
appropriate stakeholders, and assuring proper coordination. For example, the Booz Allen study
of the recruitment and hiring process was managed out of the Director’s Office, and the degree to
which the human capital staff was involved is unclear. Similarly, there was only limited
consultation with ASD officials when the Director’s Office sought contractor assistance to
provide advice on the human capital organization structure. Ideally, the need for and use of
contractors should be integral to the overall human capital planning and implementation system,
rather than being done on an ad hoc basis.

Recognizing this issue, the EAD for Administration is developing a business plan—entitled: “A
Coordination Plan for Transforming Human Capital Functions”—to coordinate the various
human capital initiatives under his purview. A draft of this plan outlines the various initiatives
and how each relates to the four cornerstones outlined in the FBI Strategic Human Capital Plan.
This plan is a foundational step to better coordination, however, the Bureau should ensure that it

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is enterprise-wide and that Intelligence Directorate and Training and Development Division
human capital initiatives, among others, are included.

Successful Transformation Strategy

Given that the FBI is in the midst of great change, it needs a well crafted, highly integrated
human capital transformation strategy. The components of a successful strategy of this kind
have emerged over the last 20 years as a variety of public and private organizations have
reorganized, merged, acquired new components, and generally adjusted to fast-paced change.

GAO has summarized the requirements for successful transformation.7 These requirements
represent the views of leaders and academics who have had experience with or studied large-
scale organizational mergers, acquisitions, and transformations, and embody the steps that should
be taken to maximize the effort to transform the human capital function to meet the needs and
expectations of the organization and its employees. They include:


Ensure top leadership drives the transformation. Leadership must set the direction, pace,
and tone and provide a clear, consistent rationale that brings everyone together behind a
single mission. This requires experienced management that is familiar with the issues.


Establish a coherent mission and integrated strategic goals to guide the transformation.

Together, these define the culture and serve as a foundation around which employees can
unite.


Focus on a key, clear set of principles and priorities at the outset of the transformation.

These will serve as a framework to help the organization create a new culture and drive
employee behaviors.


Set implementation goals and a timeline to build momentum and show progress from day

one. Goals and a timeline are essential because the transformation could take years to
complete.


Dedicate an implementation team to manage the transformation process. A strong and

stable team is important to ensure that the transformation receives the attention necessary
to be sustained and successful.


Use the performance management system to define responsibility and assure

accountability for change. A “line of sight” shows how team, unit, and individual
performance can contribute to overall organizational results.


Establish a communications strategy to create shared expectations and report progress.

The strategy must reach out to employees, customers, and stakeholders and engage them
in a two-way exchange.


7 U.S. Government Accountability Office. Results-Oriented Cultures: Implementation Steps to Assist Mergers and
Organizational Transformations. GAO-03-669. Washington, D.C.: July 2003.

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APPENDIX C

67

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector General. The Department of Justice
Terrorism Task Forces. Report I-2005-007. Washington, D.C.: June 2005.

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector General. A Review of the FBI’s Handling of
Intelligence Information Related to the September 11 Attacks. Washington, D.C.: November
2004 (Released Publicly June 2005).

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector General. The Federal Bureau of
Investigation’s Foreign Language Program – Translation of Counterterrorism and
Counterintelligence Foreign Language Material. Audit Report 04-25. Washington, D.C.: July
2004.

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector General. The Internal Effects of the Federal
Bureau of Investigation’s Reprioritization. Audit Report 04-39. Washington, D.C.: September
2004.

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector General. The Federal Bureau of
Investigation’s Management of the Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Project.
Audit Report 05-07. Washington, D.C.: February 2005.

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of the Inspector General. The Federal Bureau of
Investigation’s Efforts to Hire, Train, and Retain Intelligence Analysts. Audit Report 05-20.
Washington, D.C.: May 2005.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. A Model of Strategic Human Capital Management.
GAO-02-373SP. Washington, D.C.: March 2002.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. FBI Transformation: Initial Steps Encouraging but
Broad Transformation Needed. GAO-02-865T. Washington, D.C.: June 2002.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. FBI Reorganization: Progress Made in Efforts to
Transform, but Major Challenges Remain. GAO-03-759T. Washington, D.C.: June 2003.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. Results-Oriented Cultures: Implementation Steps to
Assist Mergers and Organizational Transformations. GAO-03-669. Washington, D.C.: July
2003.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. FBI Transformation: FBI Continues to Make Progress
in Its Efforts to Transform and Address Priorities. GAO-04-578T. Washington, D.C.: March
2004.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. FBI Transformation: Data Inconclusive on Effects of
Shift to Counterterrorism-Related Priorities on Traditional Crime Enforcement. GAO-04-1036.
Washington, D.C.: August 2004.

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APPENDIX C

68

U.S. Government Accountability Office. Information Technology: Foundation Steps Being
Taken to Make Needed FBI Systems Modernization Management Improvements. GAO-04-842.
Washington, D.C.: September 2004.

U.S. Government Accountability Office. Intelligence Reform: Human Capital Considerations
Critical to 9/11 Commission’s Proposed Reforms. GAO-04-1084T. Washington, D.C.:
September 2004.

U.S House of Representatives. Conference Report: Intelligence Reform and Terrorism
Prevention Act of 2004. Washington, D.C.: December 7, 2004.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Federal Law Enforcement Pay and Benefits – Report to
Congress. Washington D.C.: July 2004.

The White House. Further Strengthening Federal Bureau of Investigation Capabilities.
Memorandum from the President to the Attorney General. Washington, D.C.: November 23,
2004.

The White House. Bush Administration Implements WMD Commission Recommendations. Fact
Sheet. Washington, D.C.: June 29, 2005.

The White House. Strengthening the Ability of the Department of Justice to Meet Challenges to
the Security of the Nation. Memorandum from the President to selected members of the Cabinet,
the Director of National Intelligence, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs,
and the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism. Washington,
D.C.: June 29, 2005.

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