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TitleTransforming REDD+
LanguageEnglish
File Size9.8 MB
Total Pages303
Table of Contents
                            Contents
List of authors
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Summary
1 Introduction
Part 1 REDD+ finance and building blocks
	2 Pathway to impact
	3 Financing REDD+
	4 Results-based payment
	5 Information and policy change
Part 2 National politics
	6 Strategic alignment
	7 Multi-level governance
	8 Land and carbon tenure
Part 3 Assessing impacts
	9 National and subnational forest conservation policies
	10 Forests and carbon
	11 People and communities
Part 4 Evolving initiatives
	12 Subnational jurisdictional approaches
	13 The private sector
	14 Climate-smart agriculture
	15 Forest restoration
	16 Conclusions
Glossary
References
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Document Text Contents
Page 1

CIFOR

Lessons and new directions
Transforming REDD+

Edited by
Arild Angelsen, Christopher Martius, Veronique De Sy,
Amy E Duchelle, Anne M Larson and Pham Thu Thuy

Page 151

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Page 152

126 | Forests and carbon

Figure 10.3 Methods and data used in the REDD+ and forest carbon impact
literature

Method

Data

RCT

BACI

BA

Remote sensing or carbon stock
measurement

Bos et al.
(2017)

Jayachandran
et al. (2017)

Duchelle et al.
(2017)

Comparison study Location-specific study Depends on interventions

Positive impact Moderate positive impact

Simonet et al.
(2018b)

Resosudarmo
et al.
(unpublished data)

Börner et al.
(2013)

Pandey et al.
(2016)

Poffenberger
(2015)

Mix Reported
land use

References to studies within this chapter mainly derive from Duchelle et al. (2018b),
a systematic review of English-language peer-reviewed articles from 2015 to 2017
that include an ex-post assessment of REDD+ interventions, i.e., assessed after the
programme has begun. More recent articles (2018) and those prior to 2015 were
included based on the authors’ knowledge of REDD+ impact evaluation literature.
Here, we present the results of studies comparing interventions, e.g., weighing
up the role of disincentives versus incentives in forest clearing. We then discuss
the results found in location-specific studies, distinguishing non-conditional
incentives from conditional ones. Given the hybrid nature of REDD+ projects and
programmes, it is challenging to attribute outcomes to specific interventions.

10.3.1 Comparative studies: Deforestation reductions likely driven by
disincentives
In 2010, CIFOR launched its Global Comparative Study on REDD+ (GCS REDD+)
that collected BACI data from a pan-tropical sample of households in 23 REDD+
sites across Brazil, Cameroon, Indonesia, Peru, Tanzania and Vietnam. Using
Global Forest Change (GFC) data (Hansen et al. 2013a) on these 23 sites, Bos et al.
(2017) used both BA and BACI approaches to assess tree cover change at site and
village scale, finding some reduction in tree cover loss at early stages of REDD+
interventions.

Page 303

cifor.org/gcs forestsnews.cifor.org

This research was carried out by CIFOR as part of the CGIAR Research
Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA). FTA is the world’s largest
research for development program to enhance the role of forests, trees
and agroforestry in sustainable development and food security and to
address climate change. CIFOR leads FTA in partnership with Bioversity
International, CATIE, CIRAD, INBAR, ICRAF and TBI.

FTA’s work is supported by the CGIAR Trust Fund: cgiar.org/funders/

Constructive critique. This book provides a critical, evidence-based analysis of REDD+
implementation so far, without losing sight of the urgent need to reduce forest-based
emissions to prevent catastrophic climate change.
Need to test REDD+ at scale. Results-based payment, the novel feature of REDD+, has
largely gone untested. International funding (both public and private) remains scarce, and
demand through carbon markets is lacking.
Better national enabling conditions. Over 50 countries have included REDD+ in their
Nationally Determined Contributions and developed national REDD+ strategies. REDD+
has improved countries’ monitoring capacities and understanding of drivers, increased
stakeholder involvement, and provided a platform to secure indigenous and community
land rights – all key conditions for addressing deforestation and forest degradation.
Modest forest and social impacts. Local REDD+ initiatives have achieved modest but
positive outcomes for forests. Well-being impacts have been limited and mixed, but are
more likely to be positive when incentives are included.
National coordination, with a positive narrative. Forest-based mitigation strategies must
now be mainstreamed across sectors and levels of government. A strong positive narrative
on how forests contribute to economic development and climate goals could boost forest-
based mitigation, in spite of the current political uncertainties in key emitting countries.
Evolving REDD+ and new initiatives. REDD+ has evolved, and new initiatives have emerged
to support its broader objective: private sector sustainability commitments, climate-smart
agriculture, forest and landscape restoration, and more holistic jurisdictional approaches
working across legally defined territories.

Editor Arild Angelsen
Coeditors Christopher Martius, Veronique De Sy, Amy E Duchelle, Anne M Larson and Pham Thu Thuy
Editorial assistant Sarah Carter
Lead language editor Erin O’Connell
Foreword by Fabiola Muñoz
Contributors Arild Angelsen, Juan Pablo Ardila, Shintia Arwida, Stibniati S Atmadja, Haseebullah Bakhtary, Simone Carolina
Bauch, Brian Belcher, Allen Blackman, Katherine Bocanegra, Jan Börner, Astrid B Bos, Maria Brockhaus, Marisa Camargo, Sarah Carter,
Dao Thi Linh Chi, Ruben Coppus, Veronique De Sy, Paulina Deschamps-Ramírez, Monica Di Gregorio, Stephen Donofrio, Isabel Drigo,
Amy E Duchelle, Patricia Gallo, Toby Gardner, Erlend AT Hermansen, Martin Herold, Richard van der Hoff, Habtemariam Kassa, Kaisa
Korhonen-Kurki, Anne M Larson, Antoine Libert Amico, Lasse Loft, Hoang Tuan Long, Christopher Martius, Daniela A Miteva, Dagmar
Mithöfer, Moira Moeliono, Daniel Nepstad, Hambulo Ngoma, Robert M Ochieng, Claudia Ochoa, Pablo Pacheco, Herry Purnomo,
Raoni Rajão, Ashwin Ravikumar, Ida Aju Pradnja Resosudarmo, Rosa Maria Roman-Cuesta, Erika Romijn, Juan Pablo Sarmiento
Barletti, Claudio de Sassi, Erin O Sills, Gabriela Simonet, Katharine RE Sims, Denis J Sonwa, Claudia Stickler, Julie Subervie, William D
Sunderlin, Pham Thu Thuy, Tim Trench, Louis Verchot, Thales AP West, Sven Wunder.

http://cifor.org/gcs

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