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TitleTransforming Historical Harms
TagsStar Wars Comics
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.1 MB
Total Pages96
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Presented by:

A project of Eastern Mennonite University’s
Center for Justice and Peacebuilding

Transforming
Historical Harms

Page 2

2 Transforming Historical Harms

© Eastern Mennonite University

Page 48

48 Transforming Historical Harms

© Eastern Mennonite University

An Overview of Practices

Narrative is not the only type of practice that can be engaged to address
historical harms. Many other activities and strategies can uncover history,
encourage connection, heal wounds and promote action. Below is a list of
a number of narrative and other practices, grouped by the categories of
“legacy” and “aftermath.” While typically more applicable to one or the other,
these practices could span both areas.
The lists include both individual and group practices. While some believe that
change starts with the individual, and others believe that change processes
need to target groups, we believe that both are essential in addressing
historical harm. If an individual has been working on community change
processes without regard to his or her own identity and how it has been
affected by a historical harm, individual approaches could be most useful.
For those who have spent time looking at their own roles in the context of
harm, it may be time to expand the work to include groups and community.
In all cases, the direction will be contingent on what is possible within the
individual’s and community’s context. The practices in each category start
with those that have an individual focus and become more group-oriented
moving down the list .

History Connecting Healing Action
Legacy-Reading books

-Primary research
-Genealogical
research
-Oral histories
-Writing books and
articles
-Writing and
performing in plays
-Making films
-Community-wide
historical exhibits
-Films and
documentaries aired
on major networks
-Education through
radio
-Community poetry
readings
-Community plays
-Reenactments

-Self reflection
-Reaching out to the
other
-Listening
-Interviewing
-Learning the “other”
cultural narrative
-Building
relationships
-Participating in
dialogue
-Supporting
messages of
connection in media
-Dialogue groups
-Films with talk-
backs
-Film projects
that incorporate
narratives from both
sides
-Creating projects
that draw people
together from
different sides, e.g.
mother’s groups,
veterans groups, etc.

-Learning about
trauma and trauma
healing
-Prayer
-Physical activity
-Participating in
support groups
-Grieving
-Counseling
-Writing, painting
-Apologizing
-Forgiveness
-Supporting
education about
healing through
media
-Acknowledgment
and apology by
leaders
-Creating
opportunities for
story-telling
-Creating awareness
of trauma and
historical trauma

--Public apology and
acknowledgement
-Public forgiveness
-Organizing history
projects
-Telling your story
and committing to
make changes
-Providing leadership
in creating a
community-wide,
representative task
force to address
legacies
-Providing leadership
to work towards
changing policies
related to historical
harms
-Historic trials

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Transforming Historical Harms 49

© Eastern Mennonite University

History Connecting Healing Action
After-
math

-Making family
history documents
available for public
access
-Supporting a
local museum or
historical society
by volunteering or
funding
-Educational
curriculum as a
school requirement
-Building a museum
or other permanent
installations
-Permanent public
displays of historical
markers, statues,
etc.
-Truth commissions
-Dedicated funding
and support of
research through
foundations and
universities

-Working at policy
issues to address
segregation
-Working at the
policy level and
outreach for
institutions that
support integration
and unity
-Supporting diversity
initiatives
-Inter-group history
initiative that results
in a collective history
-Addressing policies
that keep people
segregated
-Creating spaces
meant for interaction
between groups that
have been separate
-Ongoing interfaith/
interethnic choirs

-Participating in
creating collective
memorials, rituals
and symbolic acts
-Participating in
and supporting
organizations
dedicated to healing
-Creating long-
term funding for
organizations
dedicated to healing
-Creating public
memorials
-Creating community
rituals
-Creating ongoing
supports for healing
-Creating
programs that
encourage healthy
living through
organizations and
policies

-Involvement in
projects that will
change policies
and laws related to
aftermaths
-Supporting efforts
for institutions
to investigate
aftermaths and
make appropriate
recommendations
-Reparations
-Correcting historical
records
-Memorializing
important historic
places and creating
memorials
-Tribunals

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© Eastern Mennonite University

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