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Titletransformation policy for south african rugby
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Table of Contents
                            Declaration
Dedication
Abstract
Acknowledgements
Contents
List of figures
List of tables
List of annexures
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: Theoretical contextualisation of the research study
Chapter 3: Literature review
Chapter 4: Research and design and methodology
Chapter 5: Results and discussion
Chapter 6: Interpretation and implications of the research findings
Chapter 7: Conclusions and recommendations
References
Annexures
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

TRANSFORMATION POLICY FOR SOUTH AFRICAN
RUGBY: COMPARATIVE PERCEPTIONS

By

Shamila Sulayman

Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of
Magister Technologicae in Public Management at the Cape Peninsula

University of Technology

Research Supervisor: Professor W. Fox

Co-Supervisor: Professor M.S. Bayat

October, 2006

Page 2

DECLARATION

I, Shamila Sulayman, hereby declare that the work in this research paper is my
own original work and that all sources used or referred to have been documented
and recognised; and that this research paper has not previously been submitted
in full or partial fulfilment of the requirements for an equivalent or higher
qualification at any other recognised education institution.

Octobel\ 2006
:i /)
iJi i

.........�~ : .

II

Page 84

CHAPTER 5: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

5.1 INTRODUCTION

The data from the questionnaires, as well as from the survey are detailed and

discussed during the course of this Chapter. Whilst each question from the

questionnaire, in terms of the response, has been comparatively calculated and

tabulated, each is also further discussed within the chapter. A similar approach

was taken for the survey results in terms of its analysis.

5.2 ANALYSIS OF THE DATA

As was mentioned by the author in Chapter 3, the initial intention with regard to

the demographics of the questionnaire respondents was to conduct the survey

amongst an equal number of black and white race groups, respectively, for the

sake of representation. The main reason for this was to test whether or not the

race of the respondent would in any way impact on the outcome of the research

results in terms of their perceptions. The underlying hypothesis would then have

to be that a respondents' perceptions would be influenced by their race and,

therefore, racial background, particularly with regard to their frame of reference.

However, from the table provided below, it is clear that the author was not able to

secure an equal number of white and black members of the public as

respondents and has, therefore, used the 35%-65% racial ratio instead. As

mentioned in the previous Chapter, the racial representation of the Springbok

survey is almost an antithesis of the questionnaire scenario, where black

73

Page 85

respondents were in the majority, while in the survey context, white respondents

were the majority.

Table 5.1: The questionnaire: A classification of the respondents

Race

Group
No. of Gender Age group

respondents

White 18 (35%) 2 (11%) Female 18-30: 11 (61%)

16 (89%) Male 31-40: 2 (11%)

41-55: 5 (28%)

Black 33 (65%) 4 (12%) Female 18-30: 28 (85%)

29 (88%) Male 31-40: 3 (9%)

41-55: 2 (6%)

It was also imperative for the author to include the perceptions of females in the

research study and, therefore, the questionnaire, not merely for the purposes of

representation, but also because of female involvement in the game. The author

has observed the growing numbers of female supporters who attend weekly club,

provincial and regional rugby matches that are held locally within the Western

Cape, as well as at (inter) national games, which are usually televised. The

author's observational experience can also testify to the fact that an increasing

number of females are able to engage in analytical, as well as technical aspects

of the game. According to Nayo (2002), female rugby is presently represented at

both South African provincial and national levels. Females also participate in

provincial coaching and refereeing courses that are offered nationally within

certain rugby provinces, such as at the Western Province Rugby Union (WPRU).

The author, therefore, used the 11 %-12% (white-black) ratio of female

respondents in the questionnaire. In this way, both genders would be presented,

whilst being able to make sufficiently informed opinions and decisions with regard

to the questions that were posed in the questionnaire.

74

Page 168

J:~t~t.!f!JiY~? ;i'
Rugby Facilities at
Clubs

;~i5ob~~p.l:rJ.:~~·I··:
;X_~o~~~s': «<::::'··_;·"":i····

Funds to Club
Structure
:Fuhd"'st6,S'ch~6i. '. '"
si~ti·~itif~; ..

t:~t~~~~~:t'f~ci,liV~s.,;!: ....

% of Rugby Facilities at
Clubs

.'%'o;iZtigbYnayi#i '••<
,S ch 00Ishl ·Rural:ATeas ,,:.

.·:;·-'.-'~l~:S:' :-'~".- ~ , .. ,.~ ;._~ ','." "-' ..--.'-' ,"- -'~~~"::-" :.:;. - .

% of Turnover Applied
to Club Structure

.:~'~~fftjlri~t!J-;t~~ljed•...

1

15

0.5

, t

20····

10 .,

'.
0.1

"

O::~7.' .
0.67

0.20

DIMENSIoN: SKILLS DEVELOPl\iENT (WEIGHTING 1~%)

iUMENSION·.
~<;7~?-·5~'~·--~·~·' .,._::','.'

...,.....

Funds
Applied

% of Payroll Applied
to Black Player,
Coach, Referee, Coach,
Management
Development

'c. '~~f~~~~l;q~' ....
% of Payroll Applied
to Defined Learnership
Programs

4

4

1 1

0.8

4

3-2

TOTAL 10% 7.8%

DIMENSION: EMPLOYMENT EQUITY (WEIGHTING 5%)

DIMENSION
~ ":. . ;.:".' to. "-.

Black
Representation

TOTAL

% Black Persons at
Levels 1, 2, and 3
(BEE scores above

'50%)

5

50/0

50 10 1.00

1.00/0

DIMENSION: PREFERENTIAL PROCUREMENT (WEIGHTING 5'%)

-WEIGHTING.' 0/0" .. ' TARGET; ACTUAL.. . ~GORE'PERFORMANCE 0/0'
Preferential

Procurement
% of Procurement from
BEE Er.~;:ies 50 65 6.5

Page 169

TOTAL 5%
'.

-,
6.5%

DIMENSION. COMl\fUNITY DEVELOPl\fENT (WEIGHTING 5%)
'.

w'EiGHTING .'. TARGET
i

" �·�.�·�,�:�.�A�q�t�;�g�~�)�:�,�·�; '$..·,..·..c.•..:..·.•....oeo..R.·.....•...�~�.�E�.�·�·..:"'>:"o?J:\/:' " ."; PERFORMANCE "
Community
Development

% of Turnover
Applied to Approved
projects in
DisadvantagedAreas

2.5 1% 2.0 5.0

TOTAL 5% 5.0%

5
5

0.4 ACHIEVED CODE:

60% to 75%

UNSATISFACTORY

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