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TOWSON UNIVERSITY
OFFICE OF GRADUATE STUDIES










TYRANNY LIVES IN THEORY: AN ANALYSIS OF RHETORICAL

RESISTANCE AND REBELLION IN ANTIGONE AND INCIDENTS IN THE

LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL





by

Maurice Robinson

A Thesis

Presented to the faculty of

Towson University

in partial fulfillment

of the requirements for the degree

Master of Arts

Humanities Program



Towson University
Towson, Maryland 21252


May, 2016

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ii

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oo familiar with slavery not to know that promises made

to slaves, though with kind intentions, and sincere at the time, depend upon many

127 The figure of rebellion is not concerned with the

censorship of his intentions, only the practicality of them. By any means, for the slave

boy, encompasses a range of physical measures he can take to manifest his enterprising

will.

It can also be said that William endured many of the hardships in the north as the

black boy following the emancipation of slavery. He was not multi-talented in domestic

settings like the women in his family. William did possess the enterprising spirit of his

grandmother but his failure in business speaks to an issue that I believe many black men

experience in business today.128 His talent and reputation in commerce is disputable. In

chapter 39, William sends a letter to Linda, drawing support for a reading room he is

-

slavery reading room in Rochester, and combining it the sale of some books and

129 However, like many former slaves

who emancipated themselves from slavery, he is unable to become an economic actor




127 Ibid., 171.


128 I do want to say that starting a successful business is tough in itself. As a black

man the task is seemingly more difficult. I remember starting my first legal business, a

pawnshop in Baltimore, MD. There were other places in my community where customers

could go to sell their goods, but we received a great deal more attention from police

detectives assigned to watching the shops for illegal activity. One day the police did a

surprise inspection of my shop after a white woman reported that her daughter stole

jewelry and sold it one of my associates. We didn't have the jewelry, but were penalized

for minor violations (a missing receipt and not having copies of police reports). The

penalty for these violations was 200,000 dollars or thirty-five years in prison. Long story

short, I had to start over.


129 Jacobs, 243.

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like his former

130 The various ventures he takes on in the north fail, but his

ambition to become self-sufficient burns bright. What interests me in this reading of

economic pursuits is that where he seems to fail, his grandmother succeeds.

Tolerability for the Subjugated Class


This discourse on American Indian sovereignty is being formed at the same time

th century. The

white man came to the new world, and brought with him disease and gunpowder. The

natives were powerless against the economic interests of European settlers. In the

colonizing of America, many people were exported into America to tend to the

plantations in the south. Years later, 1831 to be exact, the American Indian communities

that had survived the European invasion and American expansion were recognized by his

courts for their rhetorical claim to sovereignty. I believe that Jacobs is aware of the

importance of being recognized by a supreme authority. Her children and grandchildren

all have within them a will to be free, either by rebellion or resistance. I am reminded of a

birthed, partly by my estimation, by watching the rigor of his grandmother's rise to

freedom. Jacobs describes an exchange between her gr

grandmother applied to him for payment, he said the estate was insolvent, and the law

131 Although her mistress promised Aunt Martha her freedom, as a




130 Ibid.

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CURRICULUM VITA



MAURICE R. ROBINSON JR

3913 21ST AVENUE TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748

(202) 531-5314

[email protected]



EDUCATION



M.A., Humanities, May 2016, Towson University, Towson, MD

Thesis: “Tyranny Lives in Theory: an Analysis of Rhetorical Resistance and Rebellion in

Antigone and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl”



B.A., History, May 2012, Bowie State University, Bowie, MD

Thesis: “Bigger than a Hamburger: The Story of Ella Baker, her Role in the SCLC and SNCC”

Honors: History & Government Department, Martha S. Putney Award

Phi Alpha Theta, Academic Award for Excellence and Distinction



RESEARCH EXPERIENCE



Research Assistant, , Bowie MD (8/2014-12/2014)

Studied the effects of mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex in the African

American community





PRESENTATIONS



Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference, Towson, MD, 2013

Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference, Bowie, MD, 2011



COMPUTER SKILLS



Microsoft Excel, PowerPoint, Word; Photoshop; Windows; Mac

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