Download Tour De France for Dummies (ISBN - 0764584499) PDF

TitleTour De France for Dummies (ISBN - 0764584499)
TagsFor Dummies
LanguageEnglish
File Size11.8 MB
Total Pages293
Table of Contents
                            Tour de France For Dummies
About the Authors
Authors’ Dedications and Acknowledgments
Contents at a Glance
Table of Contents
Foreword
Introduction
	About This Book
	Conventions Used in This Book
	What You’re Not to Read
	Foolish Assumptions
	How This Book Is Organized
	Icons Used in This Book
	Where to Go from Here
Chapter 1: Answering All Your Tour Questions
	Understanding the Race and the Strategies
	Understanding Those Colored Jerseys
	Choosing the Right Stuff: From Bikes to Snacks
	Spectating During the Tour
Chapter 2: Understanding the Tour de France Race Routes
	What’s a Stage, How Many Are There, and How Long Are They?
	Choosing the Route and Stage Each Year
	Figuring Out Where to Start
	Time Trials, Mountains Stages, Prologues, and More
	Scouting the New Route: Practice Makes Perfect
Chapter 3: The Races within the Race
	Timing: Every Second Counts
	Getting to Know Jerseys
	Explaining the Overall General Classification
	Standing on the Podium (and Kissing the Podium Girls)
	The Honor of the Lanterne Rouge
	Riding in the Broom Wagon
Chapter 4: It’s All about the Team
	What’s Team Got to Do with It?
	Selecting a Team — All Shapes, Sizes, and Skills
	Recognizing the Team Behind the Team
Chapter 5: More Tour Rules Than You Ever Want to Know
	Knowing Some Important Tour de France Regulations
	Who’s Keeping Score and Why?
Chapter 6: Understanding Race Strategies
	Here’s the Plan, Man!
	Miles to Go Before I Sleep
	Heeding Nature’s Call While Riding
Chapter 7: Who Are These Guys and How Do They Do It?
	Two Hundred Cyclists: Maintaining Their Bodies
	What’s Up, Doc?
	Things That Go Bump in the Day
Chapter 8: Spending a Day in the Life of a Rider
	Morning, Noon, and Night
	Moving On Down the Road
	Get Ready, Get Set, Go!
	Starting the Race
	Lunch for the Bunch
	It Ain’t Over ’Til It’s Over
	Traveling to the Next Hotel
	No Fun-Filled Evenings for the Riders
	No Rest for the Weary on Rest Day
Chapter 9: Having the Best Equipment in the Bunch
	Using High-Tech Bikes
	Wheels Go Round and Round
	Shifting Gears
	A Helmet Is a Helmet — Not!
	Wearing a Kaleidoscope of Kits
Chapter 10: Perfecting the Art of Spectating from Home
	Watching in Your Pajamas
	Cybering the Tour
	Sounding Like an Expert
Chapter 11: Going to the Tour: A Brief Guide
	On Your Own or with a Tour Group
	Details, Details, Details
	Where to Watch
	The Thrill of Finishing on the Champs Élysées
Chapter 12: Ten Greatest Riders in Tour History
	Jacques Anquetil
	Lance Armstrong
	Gino Bartali
	Fausto Coppi
	Bernard Hinault
	Miguel Indurain
	Greg LeMond
	Eddy Merckx
	Jan Ullrich
	Joop Zoetemelk
Chapter 13: The Ten Most Important Tours in History
	1903: Publishing Wars and Garin Make History
	1913: Time Changes, Tour Reverses
	1919: The Yellow Jersey Debuts
	1938: Le Tour: A Team Sport
	1969: Eddy Merckx Arrives and Dominates
	1986: Greg LeMond and Other Americans in Paris
	1989: LeMond Dramatically Wins Again
	1999: Armstrong Shocks the World
	2003: Armstrong and Ullrich Pedal in Fast Company
	2004: Armstrong Rides Into History
Chapter 14: Ten Unique Tour de France Statistics
	Young, Restless, and Champion
	Old and Leading the Pack
	Will You Still Need Me When I’m 32?
	Winning, French Style
	Taking the Long Way Home
	Pedaling Short, But Not So Sweet
	Humbling Experience: 300 Miles of Torture
	Speeding Over Hill and Dale
	Knowing Your Neighbors: An American in Paris
	Climbing Into the Clouds: The Great Peaks of the Tour
Chapter 15: Ten Dramatic Tour de France Moments
	Assassins Among Us (1910)
	A Tour First: Death in the Peloton (1935)
	Poulidor Versus Anquetil (1964)
	Merckx Attacked in the Mountains (1975)
	Hampsten Conquers L’Alpe d’Huez (1992)
	LeMond Rides into History (1989)
	Armstrong Salutes Fallen Fabio (1995)
	Sitting Down on the Job (1998)
	Hamilton Shows His Mettle in the Mountains (2003)
	Riding through Hay Fields (2003)
Chapter 16: Ten Great Tour Climbs and Mountaintops
	Aspin
	Aubisque
	Courchevel
	Galibier
	Glandon
	Izoard
	L’Alpe d’Huez
	La Mongie
	Luz-Ardiden
	Madeleine
	Mont Ventoux
	Puy de Dome
	Sestrieres
Chapter 17: Ten Other Important Races
	Amstel Gold Race
	Clasica San Sebastian (San Sebastian Classic)
	Giro d’Italia (Tour of Italy)
	Liege-Bastogne-Liege
	Milan– San Remo
	Olympic Road Race
	Paris Roubaix
	Tour of Flanders
	Vuelta a Espana (Tour of Spain)
	World Championship (Road Race)
Glossary
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Tour de France
FOR

DUMmIES


by Phil Liggett, James Raia,
Sammarye Lewis

Foreword by Lance Armstrong

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Page 146

in France in sweltering heat needs maximum ventilation from his
helmet. Airflow is critical to carrying away body heat in summer
temperatures and moisture in cold temperatures. In fact, research
by the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute shows that a well ventilated
helmet is cooler in summer heat than a bare head. This is why
many helmets are advertised by the number of vents they contain.

But a rider also needs maximum protection from crashes. A sleek,
240-gram, 18-vent helmet provides excellent ventilation, but it also
needs to have maximum impact performance. A helmet has to be
designed to manage the crash energy and protect the head and
brain. Having larger vents and lighter helmet shells doesn’t always
provide maximum protection.

Ask a pro rider what he wants in a helmet, and he’ll likely say he’s
looking for a model with minimum weight and maximum ventila-
tion. But riders wear sponsor helmets, regardless of ventilation or
weight.

Time trial helmets: Aerodynamics
is everything
Polycarbonate shells, painstakingly designed and tested in wind tun-
nels, are standard for time trial helmets. Sculpted designs, experi-
mentations with materials and textures, and lab testing at every
stage all help to produce a helmet that can claim a time trial win.

Ventilation is not usually a priority for time trial helmets, given the
short length of the races, nor do helmets offer much impact protec-
tion. Because micro-thin shells aren’t lined, ventilation comes from
air circulating under the shell, but it’s in lieu of impact protection.

Part III: Loving the Ride: A Man and His Bike 126

Doing the daily laundry
Riders are issued only a minimal amount of team clothing. They don’t have an unlim-
ited number of jerseys and shorts. As soon as riders return to their hotel, they put
dirty laundry into mesh bags and place the bags outside their room doors. A
soigneur picks up bags and heads for the nearest Laundromat. All clothing and mesh
bags are labeled with each rider’s name. You won’t see an exhausted, hungry rider
with a hectic evening schedule washing his socks in a motel bathroom.

For non-riding occasions, each rider receives casual pants, shirts, sweat suits, and
tennis shoes with sponsor logos.

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Sleek, aerodynamic designs with minimal wind profile and wind
drag are optimal time trial helmet benefits. Time trial helmets weigh
about 8 ounces. Their design includes an aerodynamic tail that
extends in the rear to provide unfettered air flow over riders’ backs,
and their unique shape looks like an outer-space creation (see
Figure 9-2). These newfangled shapes are excellent for time trials
and are standard in European races. But engineers in the United
States are working on new models, because they believe tear-
dropped-shaped helmets can snag on roads in crashes and cause
severe head and neck twists. Louis Garneau and Shain are compa-
nies offering time trial helmets approved for use in U.S. racing.

Figure 9-2: Time trial helmets hanging in the U. S. Postal Service Cycling
Team truck.

Wearing a Kaleidoscope of Kits
A kit is a rider’s uniform. A rider’s full kit, that is, the entire ensem-
ble of clothing he’ll wear during the year, includes the following:

� Jersey: A jersey is a top that riders wear. Riders wear team jer-
seys (adorned with numerous sponsor logos) that are form-
fitting, so that nothing flaps around to cause wind resistance.

Chapter 9: Having the Best Equipment in the Bunch 127

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