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TitleTHEME 4: Person to Person - Education Place
LanguageEnglish
File Size8.0 MB
Total Pages42
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Th
em

e 4

THEME 4: Person to Person122

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Page 2

THEME 4: Person to Person 123

Selections

1 Mariah Keeps Cool

2 Mom’s Best Friend

3 Yang the Second and
Her Secret Admirers

4 Dear Mr. Henshaw

Person to Person

E N G L I S H L A N G U A G E D E V E L O P M E N T L E S S O N S F O RE N G L I S H L A N G U A G E D E V E L O P M E N T L E S S O N S F O R

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Page 21

Feeling Happy
Read with students this sentence in the last paragraph on Anthology page 372:

“The night before you were born, I wondered how I could love a second child

as much as your brother. Then you came, and like magic, I was just as crazy

about you.”

Explain that in this sentence, crazy about means “very excited about, or

fond of.” Then engage students in a discussion about different ways to

tell about feeling excited about or fond of something.

Write key words from the discussion on the board, including: happy,

excited, glad, content, thrilled, relieved, overjoyed, delighted. Once the

list is completed, point to each word on the list, read it aloud, and have students

repeat it chorally. If possible, have partners use a dictionary to look up words and

compare meanings. You may want to help them understand the different shades

of meaning each word has; for example, relieved can mean “happy that things

have turned out well.”

Write this cloze frame on the board: I am _____ that _____.

Model how to complete the sentence, filling in the first blank

with a word from the board and the second blank with something you are happy

about. Have students take turns completing the sentence orally, using other

words from the list.

LO

OK

SP
EA

K

THEME 4: Person to Person142

THEME 4/SELECTION 2: Mom’s Best Friend

Have students choose
two feelings from the
list on the board and
draw themselves
expressing that feel-
ing. Ask them to label
their pictures with a
complete sentence
using the cloze frame.

Have students work in
pairs. Write this dia-
logue on the board:
Are you _____? Yes, I
am _____ because
_____. Have pairs
use the dialogue
and words from the
board to carry out
conversations about
feeling happy.

Have students write
short paragraphs
about a time they felt
very happy. Encourage
them to use at least
three of the expres-
sions on the board.

Vocabulary
crazy about, happy, excited,
glad, content, thrilled,
relieved, overjoyed, delighted

Materials
• Anthology
• dictionary

Beginning/Preproduction
See Master ELL 4–4.

Display “Puppy Time” and
read it aloud with students.
Then write on the board the
possessive pronoun/object
pronoun pairs from Day 4,
read them aloud, and review
their meanings with students.
Next, have students rewrite
the poem, changing
possessive pronouns and
object pronouns to create new
versions. Have them read
their versions aloud.

LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT 20–25 MINUTES

Tell About It

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Page 22

Combining Sentences by Using
Introductory Phrases
Write the term introductory phrase on the board. Explain to students that they
can improve their writing by using an introductory phrase to combine two short

sentences into one long sentence.

Write the following sentences on the board. Jim plays soccer. He will play soc-
cer after school. We can combine these two short sentences into one long

sentence so that it doesn�t sound so choppy. Then write: After school, Jim will

play soccer. Read the sentence several times. Prompt students to compare the

two short sentences and the one new, long sentence.

Give additional examples of two short sentences that can be combined into one
longer sentence by using an introductory phrase. Prompt students and help to

identify appropriate introductory phrases as necessary.

SELECTION 2: Mom’s Best Friend DAY 50 143

Skill Objective
Students combine sentences
by using introductory
phrases.

Academic Language
• introductory phrase

Write examples of
sentences with intro-
ductory phrases on
the board. You might
use sentences such
as Before dinner,
she does her home-
work. Next week,
we will go to the
museum. Have part-
ners work together to
identify the introduc-
tory phrases.

Write sets of three
sentences on the
board that include two
short sentences and
the one combined
sentence joined by an
introductory phrase.
Have partners work
together to identify the
words that are similar
between the two short
sentences and the one
long sentence.

Write sets of two short
sentences on the
board that can be
combined into one
longer sentence by
using an introductory
phrase. Have partners
or groups of three talk
about ways to combine
the sentences and
identify introductory
phrases.

SKILL FOCUS: WRITING 20–25 MINUTES

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Page 41

Restaurants
Have students find and read this sentence from the last paragraph on Anthology

page 424: Then Angela Badger arrived with Mr. Badger, and we were all led

into the dining room which was pretty crowded.

Leigh, the boy in the story, is going to have lunch in the dining

room of a restaurant. What do people do when they go to a

restaurant? Lead students in pantomiming these actions as you name them:

taking a seat at a table; putting the napkin in your lap; looking at the menu; giving

your order to the waiter or waitress; going to the salad bar; using knife, fork, and

spoon to eat the meal; paying the bill; leaving a tip; going home.

Have students compare and contrast eating in a restaurant

and eating at home. List comparisons in a chart similar to the

one below.

M
O

VE

THEME 4: Person to Person162

THEME 4/SELECTION 4: Dear Mr. Henshaw

Have students draw
their family eating at
home, and then eating
at a restaurant. Ask
them to label their
pictures.

What restaurant
would you like to go
to? What would you do
first if you went there?
What next? What after
that? Encourage
students to answer in
complete sentences.

Have pairs of students
role-play servers and
patrons in a
restaurant. After one
role-play, have them
exchange roles.

Vocabulary
restaurant, dining room,
menu, waiter, waitress,
bill, tip

Materials
• Anthology

Beginning/Preproduction
See Master ELL 4–10.

Display the poem “When I
Write” and read it aloud with
students. Then point to the
word I in the title. Say: When I
speak or write, I use the
words I, me, my, and mine to
talk about myself. That’s what
the writer did here. Have
students look at the second
verse and find all the words
the writer used to refer to
himself or herself. (I, I’ve, I,
My, I) Ask: How would this
verse be different if it was
about me? Point to yourself.
Guide students to change the
pronouns in the title and the
second verse to You, you’ve,
You, Your, and you. Read the
revised poem together. Then
follow the same procedure for
making the poem talk about a
female student, changing the
verbs as necessary. Finally,
do the same for making it talk
about a male student.

LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT 20–25 MINUTES

Time to Eat

Eating at Home Eating in a Restaurant
Just our family eats. Many people come to eat.

A parent decides We choose foods from a menu.
what we will eat.

We cook the food. The cook prepares the food.

The children The waiter or waitress
clear the table. clears the table.

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Page 42

Expanding Sentences with
Adjectives
Review the term adjective with students. Explain to students that they can
make the descriptions they are writing more interesting by adding adjectives.

Write a sentence on the board such as: I ate an apple today. Read the sentence
and have students repeat. What kind of apple did I eat today? Prompt stu-

dents as necessary to call out adjectives that describe apples and write their

responses on the board. Rewrite the sentence with one of the adjectives (i.e., I

ate a red apple today./I ate a sweet apple today.).

Present additional simple sentences on the board. Call on volunteers to suggest
adjectives to describe the nouns in the sentences. Accept any answer that stu-

dents can justify.

SELECTION 4: Dear Mr. Henshaw DAY 50 163

Skill Objective
Students expand sentences
with adjectives to improve
their writing.

Academic Language
• adjectives

Suggest an object
such as a car, a cat,
or a tree and have
students draw it.
Encourage them to
think about adding
details to the picture
that makes the object
more interesting.
Help students label
the details on their
pictures.

Write several simple
sentences on the
board. Have students
write down an appro-
priate adjective that
adds detail for each
sentence. Then ask
students to join
together in groups of
three or four to com-
pare and discuss the
adjectives they chose.

Have students choose
four or five objects
such as a computer, a
chair, a flower, and so
on. Have students
then write a sentence
containing an adjective
for each object. Help
with vocabulary as
necessary.

SKILL FOCUS: WRITING 20–25 MINUTES

Language Transfer Support
Some English language
learners may not be familiar
with the differences between
adjective forms and noun
forms. In some languages,
adjectives and nouns have
the same forms. If students
say or write sentences with
adjective/noun combinations
such as He is an intelligence
boy, correct them by saying
He is an intelligent boy.
Have students repeat the
corrected sentence.

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