Download The Ultimate Guide to U.S. Army Survival Skills, Tactics, and Techniques PDF

TitleThe Ultimate Guide to U.S. Army Survival Skills, Tactics, and Techniques
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size50.0 MB
Total Pages1552
Table of Contents
                            Title Page
Copyright Page
Introduction
PART I - General Survival Skills
CHAPTER 1 - Psychology of Survival
	INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 2 - Psychology of Survival
	A LOOK AT STRESS
	NATURAL REACTIONS
	PREPARING YOURSELF
CHAPTER 3 - Survival Planning and Survival Kits
	IMPORTANCE OF PLANNING
	SURVIVAL KITS
PART II - Survival Medicine
Introduction
	REQUIREMENTS FOR MAINTENANCE OF HEALTH: OVERVIEW
	MEDICAL EMERGENCIES
	LIFESAVING STEPS
	BONE AND JOINT INJURY
	BITES AND STINGS
	WOUNDS
	ENVIRONMENTAL INJURIES
	HERBAL MEDICINES
CHAPTER 1 - Fundamental Criteria for First Aid
	SECTION I. EVALUATE CASUALTY
	SECTION II. UNDERSTAND VITAL BODY FUNCTIONS
CHAPTER 2 - Basic Measures for First Aid
	SECTION I. OPEN THE AIRWAY AND RESTORE BREATHING
	SECTION II. STOP THE BLEEDING AND PROTECT THE WOUND
	SECTION III. CHECK AND TREAT FOR SHOCK
CHAPTER 3 - First Aid for Special Wounds
	SECTION I. GIVE PROPER FIRST AID FOR HEAD INJURIES
	SECTION II. GIVE PROPER FIRST AID FOR FACE AND NECK INJURIES
	SECTION III. GIVE PROPER FIRST AID FOR CHEST AND ABDOMINAL WOUNDS AND BURN INJURIES
	SECTION IV. APPLY PROPER BANDAGES TO UPPER AND LOWER EXTREMITIES
CHAPTER 4 - First Aid for Fractures
CHAPTER 5 - First Aid for Climatic Injuries
CHAPTER 6 - First Aid for Bites and Stings
CHAPTER 7 - First Aid in Toxic Environments
	SECTION I. INDIVIDUAL PROTECTION AND FIRST AID EQUIPMENT FOR TOXIC SUBSTANCES
	SECTION II. CHEMICAL-BIOLOGICAL AGENTS
	SECTION III. NERVE AGENTS
	SECTION IV. OTHER AGENTS
APPENDIX A - First Aid Case and Kits, Dressings, and Bandages
APPENDIX B - Rescue and Transportation Procedures
APPENDIX C - Common Problems/Conditions
	SECTION I. HEALTH MAINTENANCE
	SECTION II. FIRST AID FOR COMMON PROBLEMS
APPENDIX D - Digital Pressure
	APPLY DIGITAL PRESSURE
APPENDIX E - Decontamination Procedures
	APPLY DIGITAL PRESSURE
PART III - Shelters
Introduction
	SHELTER SITE SELECTION
	TYPES OF SHELTERS
CHAPTER 1 - Planning Positions
	WEAPONS EFFECTS
	CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
	POSITION CATEGORIES
	CONSTRUCTION METHODS
	SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION CONSIDERATIONS
CHAPTER 2 - Designing Positions
	BASIC DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
	INDIVIDUAL FIGHTING POSITIONS
	TRENCHES
	UNIT POSITIONS
	SPECIAL DESIGNS
CHAPTER 3 - Special Operations and Situations
	SPECIAL TERRAIN ENVIRONMENTS
CHAPTER 4 - Position Design Details
PART IV - Water, Food, Plants, Herbal Remedies, and Dangerous Plants and Animals
CHAPTER 1 - Water Procurement
	WATER SOURCES
	STILL CONSTRUCTION
	WATER PURIFICATION
	WATER FILTRATION DEVICES
CHAPTER 2 - Food Procurement
	ANIMALS FOR FOOD
	TRAPS AND SNARES
	KILLING DEVICES
	FISHING DEVICES
	PREPARATION OF FISH AND GAME FOR COOKING AND STORAGE
CHAPTER 3 - Dangerous Insects and Arachnids
CHAPTER 4 - Poisonous Snakes and Lizards
	WAYS TO AVOID SNAKEBITE
	SNAKE GROUPS
	DESCRIPTIONS OF POISONOUS SNAKES
	LIZARDS
	POISONOUS SNAKES OF THE AMERICAS
	POISONOUS SNAKES OF EUROPE
	POISONOUS SNAKES OF AFRICA AND ASIA
	POISONOUS SNAKES OF AUSTRALASIA
	POISONOUS SEA SNAKES
	POISONOUS LIZARDS
CHAPTER 5 - Dangerous Fish and Mollusks
	DANGERS IN RIVERS
	FISH THAT ATTACK MAN
	VENOMOUS FISH AND INVERTEBRATES
	FISH WITH TOXIC FLESH
CHAPTER 6 - Survival Use of Plants
	EDIBILITY OF PLANTS
	PLANTS FOR MEDICINE
	MISCELLANEOUS USE OF PLANTS
	EDIBLE AND MEDICINAL PLANTS
CHAPTER 7 - Poisonous Plants
	HOW PLANTS POISON
	ALL ABOUT PLANTS
	RULES FOR AVOIDING POISONOUS PLANTS
	CONTACT DERMATITIS
	INGESTION POISONING
	POISONOUS PLANTS
PART V - Firecraft, Tools, Camouflage, Tracking, Movement, and Combat Skills
CHAPTER 1 - Firecraft
	BASIC FIRE PRINCIPLES
	SITE SELECTION AND PREPARATION
	FIRE MATERIAL SELECTION
	HOW TO BUILD A FIRE
	HOW TO LIGHT A FIRE
CHAPTER 2 - Field-expedient Weapons, Tools, and Equipment
	CLUBS
	EDGED WEAPONS
	OTHER EXPEDIENT WEAPONS
	LASHING AND CORDAGE
	RUCKSACK CONSTRUCTION
	CLOTHING AND INSULATION
	COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS
CHAPTER 3 - Hand-to-hand Combat
	SECTION I: OVERVIEW
	SECTION II: CLOSE-RANGE COMBATIVES
CHAPTER 4 - Medium-Range Combatives
CHAPTER 5 - Long-range Combatives
	SECTION I: NATURAL WEAPONS
	SECTION II: DEFENSIVE TECHNIQUES
	SECTION III: OFFENSIVE TECHNIQUES
	SECTION IV: FIELD-EXPEDIENT WEAPONS
CHAPTER 6 - Sentry Removal
CHAPTER 7 - Cover, Concealment, and Camouflage
	GENERAL
	COVER
	CONCEALMENT
	CAMOUFLAGE
	CAMOUFLAGE CONSIDERATIONS
	HOW TO CAMOUFLAGE
CHAPTER 8 - Tracking
	GENERAL
	TRACKER QUALITIES
	FUNDAMENTALS OF TRACKING
	DISPLACEMENT
	HOW TO ANALYZE FOOTPRINTS
	OTHER SIGNS OF DISPLACEMENT
	STAINING
	WEATHERING
	FOOTPRINTS
	WIND, SOUNDS, AND ODORS
	SUN
	LITTERING
	CAMOUFLAGE
	INTERPRETATION/IMMEDIATE USE INTELLIGENCE
	TRACKING TEAMS
	COUNTERTRACKING
CHAPTER 9 - Movement
	GENERAL
	MOVEMENT TECHNIQUES
	METHODS OF MOVEMENT
	MOVING WITH STEALTH
	IMMEDIATE ACTIONS WHILE MOVING
	MOVING WITHIN A TEAM
	FIRE AND MOVEMENT
	FOOT MARCH LOADS
CHAPTER 10 - Field-expedient Direction Finding
	USING THE SUN AND SHADOWS
	USING THE MOON
	USING THE STARS
	MAKING IMPROVISED COMPASSES
	OTHER MEANS OF DETERMINING DIRECTION
PART VI - Environment-Specific Survival
CHAPTER 1 - Tropical Survival
	TROPICAL WEATHER
	TYPES OF JUNGLES
	COMMON JUNGLE FEATURES
	LIFE IN THE JUNGLE
	JUNGLE TRAVEL, NAVIGATION AND TRACKING
	MOVING ACROSS WATER OBSTACLES
CHAPTER 2 - Desert Survival
	TERRAIN
	TEMPERATURE
	ACCLIMATIZATION
	BASIC HEAT INJURY PREVENTION
CHAPTER 3 - Cold Weather Survival
	COLD REGIONS AND LOCATIONS
	WINDCHILL
	BASIC PRINCIPLES OF COLD WEATHER SURVIVAL
	HYGIENE
	MEDICAL ASPECTS
	COLD INJURIES
	SHELTERS
	FIRE
	WATER
	FOOD
	TRAVEL
	WEATHER SIGNS
CHAPTER 4 - Survival in Mountain Terrain
	SECTION 1: MOUNTAIN TERRAIN AND WEATHER
	SECTION 2: MOUNTAIN HAZARDS
	SECTION 3: MOUNTAINEERING EQUIPMENT
	SECTION 4: ROPE MANAGEMENT AND KNOTS
	SECTION 5: ANCHORS
	SECTION 6: CLIMBING
CHAPTER 5 - Sea Survival
	THE OPEN SEA
	PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES
	DOWN AT SEA
	COLD WEATHER CONSIDERATIONS
	HOT WEATHER CONSIDERATIONS
	RAFT PROCEDURES
	SAILING RAFTS
	WATER
	FOOD PROCUREMENT
	SHARKS
	DETECTING LAND
	RAFTING OR BEACHING TECHNIQUES
	SWIMMING ASHORE
	PICKUP OR RESCUE
	SEASHORES
	SPECIAL HEALTH HAZARDS
CHAPTER 6 - Water Crossings
	RIVERS AND STREAMS
	RAPIDS
	RAFTS
	FLOTATION DEVICES
	OTHER WATER OBSTACLES
	VEGETATION OBSTACLES
CHAPTER 7 - Survival in Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Environments
	THE NUCLEAR ENVIRONMENT
	BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS
	CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENTS
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Table of Contents


Title Page
Copyright Page
Introduction

PART I - General Survival Skills


CHAPTER 1 - Psychology of Survival


INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 2 - Psychology of Survival


A LOOK AT STRESS
NATURAL REACTIONS
PREPARING YOURSELF


CHAPTER 3 - Survival Planning and Survival Kits


IMPORTANCE OF PLANNING
SURVIVAL KITS


PART II - Survival Medicine


Introduction


REQUIREMENTS FOR MAINTENANCE OF HEALTH: OVERVIEW
MEDICAL EMERGENCIES
LIFESAVING STEPS
BONE AND JOINT INJURY

Page 776

Other Uses: The shaggy material at the base of the leaves makes an excellent
rope as it is strong and resists decay.



Sweetsop
Annona squamosa

Description: This tree is small, seldom more than 6 meters tall, and multi-
branched. It has alternate, simple, elongate, dark green leaves. Its fruit is green
when ripe, round in shape, and covered with protruding bumps on its surface.
The fruit’s flesh is white and creamy.

Habitat and Distribution: Look for sweetsop at margins of fields, near villages,
and around homesites in tropical regions.

Edible Parts: The fruit flesh is edible raw.

Other Uses: You can use the finely ground seeds as an insecticide.

CAUTION

Page 777

The ground seeds are extremely dangerous to the eyes.





Tamarind
Tamarindus indica

Description: The tamarind is a large, densely branched tree, up to 25 meters tall.
Its has pinnate leaves (divided like a feather) with 10 to 15 pairs of leaflets.

Habitat and Distribution: The tamarind grows in the drier parts of Africa,
Asia, and the Philippines. Although it is thought to be a native of Africa, it has
been cultivated in India for so long that it looks like a native tree. It it also found
in the American tropics, the West Indies, Central America, and tropical South
America.

Edible Parts: The pulp surrounding the seeds is rich in vitamin C and is an
important survival food. You can make a pleasantly acid drink by mixing the
pulp with water and sugar or honey and letting the mixture mature for several
days. Suck the pulp to relieve thirst. Cook the young, unripe fruits or seedpods
with meat. Use the young leaves in soup. You must cook the seeds. Roast them
above a fire or in ashes. Another way is to remove the seed coat and soak the
seeds in salted water and grated coconut for 24 hours, then cook them. You can

Page 1551

Irritation in the nose or eyes or on the skin is an urgent warning to protect
your body from chemical agents. Additionally, a strange taste in food, water, or
cigarettes may serve as a warning that they have been contaminated.


As a survivor, always use the following
general steps, in the order listed, to protect yourself from a chemical attack:
• Use protective equipment.
• Give quick and correct self-aid when contaminated.
• Avoid areas where chemical agents exist.
• Decontaminate your equipment and body as soon as possible.


Your protective mask and overgarment are the key to your survival. Without

these, you stand very little chance of survival. You must take care of these items
and protect them from damage. You must practice and know correct self-aid
procedures before exposure to chemical agents. The detection of chemical agents
and the avoidance of contaminated areas is extremely important to your survival.
Use whatever detection kits may be available to help in detection. Since you are
in a survival situation, avoid contaminated areas at all costs. You can expect no
help should you become contaminated. If you do become contaminated,
decontaminate yourself as soon as possible using proper procedures.


If you find yourself in a contaminated area, try to move out of the area
as fast as possible. Travel crosswind or upwind to reduce the time spent in the
downwind hazard area. If you cannot leave the area immediately and have to
build a shelter, use normal shelter construction techniques, with a few changes.
Build the shelter in a clearing, away from all vegetation. Remove all topsoil in
the area of the shelter to decontaminate the area. Keep the shelter’s entrance
closed and oriented at a 90-degree angle to the prevailing wind. Do not build a
fire using contaminated wood—the smoke will be toxic. Use extreme caution
when entering your shelter so that you will not bring contamination inside.


As with biological and nuclear environments, getting
water in a chemical environment is difficult. Obviously, water in sealed
containers is your best and safest source. You must protect this water as much as
possible. Be sure to decontaminate the containers before opening.
If you cannot get water in sealed containers, try to get it from a closed source

such as underground water pipes. You may use rainwater or snow if there is no

Page 1552

evidence of contamination. Use water from slow-moving streams, if necessary,
but always check first for signs of contamination, and always filter the water as
described under nuclear conditions. Signs of water source contamination are
foreign odors such as garlic, mustard, geranium, or bitter almonds; oily spots on
the surface of the water or nearby; and the presence of dead fish or animals. If
these signs are present, do not use the water. Always boil or purify the water to
prevent bacteriological infection.


It is extremely difficult to eat while in a contaminated area.
You will have to break the seal on your protective mask to eat. If you eat, find an
area in which you can safely unmask. The safest source of food is your sealed
combat rations. Food in sealed cans or bottles will also be safe. Decontaminate
all sealed food containers before opening, otherwise you will contaminate the
food.
If you must supplement your combat rations with local plants or animals, do

not use plants from contaminated areas or animals that appear to be sick. When
handling plants or animals, always use protective gloves and clothing.

Similer Documents