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TitleThe Trustworthy Leader: Leveraging the Power of Trust to Transform Your Organization
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.0 MB
Total Pages201
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Table of Contents
Cover

Praise for The Trustworthy Leader

Title page

Copyright page

DEDICATION

PREFACE

CHAPTER ONE: THE TRUSTWORTHY LEADER
WHAT IT MEANS TO BE TRUSTWORTHY
WHAT IS TRUST?
THE MYTH OF THE SUCCESSFUL LEADER
THE VIRTUOUS CIRCLE
WHAT THE TRUSTWORTHY LEADER LOOKS LIKE
WHAT NEXT: HOW TO USE THIS BOOK

CHAPTER TWO: THE HONOR OF LEADERSHIP
HUMILITY
RECIPROCITY
POSITION AWARENESS
CONTINUING THE CIRCLE

CHAPTER THREE: INCLUSION
GENUINE BELIEF IN THE VALUE OF OTHERS

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appreciate the honesty.”
Ultimately, it boils down to a very simple premise: if people don’t understand

what is going on, their ability to trust you will be compromised. If they do
understand, they will be open to trusting you deeply. And that level of trust that
you develop over time will make it possible to fulfill your mission quickly and
effectively. Following Buzachero’s example by sharing information that creates
understanding will also help you to move on to the next step in the process:
enabling people’s ability to participate.

For me, I think one of the best words that people are using is . I
think that is a big one for us, when you ask your manager: “When are we
going to have money for this equipment?” or whatever we need, and having
that person say, “I don’t know” or “Not until next year,” being honest is a
really important thing. I think people respect the manager, even if it is bad
news. A lot of other businesses do not foster a trust environment, but our
leaders are very honest about what’s going on.

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ENHANCING PARTICIPATION
People at Hoar Construction, a real estate contracting and construction firm,
often describe themselves by what they are not. They are not bashful, they are
not shy to speak up, and they are not passive if something has happened that they
disagree with. In part because of what they are not, what they is part of a
very successful company with a strength of character and depth of reserve that is
now propelling the company forward as the construction market—dismal in the
global recession that began in 2008—begins to pick up steam.
Hoar Construction has been recognized as one of the Best Small & Medium

Companies to Work For since 2007. Leaders there invite people to participate in
the life of the organization, just as they do at Scripps—by first helping people to
understand. Communication at the company, which is based in Birmingham,
Alabama, has been characterized by openness since its founding in 1940. In the
last several years that openness has been heightened, as more opportunities have
been created for people to see and talk with their leaders. This brings with it a
certain level of vulnerability for leaders, because decisions can be challenged
directly. Yet at Hoar, leaders believe that they—and the company—are better off
if they hear people out, and they use the compliments and the criticism to make
the business stronger.
At a base level, Hoar uses the same practical communication techniques many

leaders do: they send out newsletters and emails, go on site visits, and join in
team meetings. They do it vigilantly, and it’s effective. One employee, Stacy,
says, “I feel like one of the things that our upper management does is they keep
an open line of communication with everyone. The economy is not great right
now. I am in the Tennessee division. I’m not in Birmingham all the time, but we
always feel like we know what’s going on down here because we have regular
updates from the president of our company, and state of the economy updates.
We know what big jobs have been awarded down here. I feel they do a very
good job of keeping everybody in the know.”
Yet there is also something more that happens at Hoar, something that goes

beyond the base level and underscores leaders’ willingness to share considerable
information and answer innumerable questions. Namely, the Trustworthy
Leaders at Hoar want people to understand the information being shared, and
they want people to it—to ask more questions, pursue a new idea, or find

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through The Servant as Leader (Greenleaf) Servant leaders
Sharing benefits, inclusion through Sharing information; to address risk;
development of belief in; to enhance participation; to extend influence; in hiking
experience; importance of; leaders practicing; to promote understanding; as
quality of Trustworthy Leaders; tools for Simplicity
Stew Leonard’s
Story, Ellen
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (Kuhn) Stumpo, Barb
Success: defined in terms of money; developing people for long-term; leaders
achieving; likelihood of, when dealing with uncertainty. See also Financial
success Support systems, for diverse employees

Tavello, Jill
TDIndustries
Thurow, Laura
Tilley, Mary
Training: at Griffin Hospital; at Hoar Construction; at Mayo Clinic; Myers-
Briggs; at REI; at Robert Baird & Co.; at Stew Leonard’s Transparency
Trust: in 100 Best Companies; building relationships based on; described;
developed through sharing information; following based on; importance of;
needed for change; as resource when facing uncertainty; stereotypes about Trust
Index
Trustworthy Leaders: benefits of leadership style of; examples of; financial
success attained by; how to use stories of; imperfection accepted by; prevalence
of; qualities of; simplicity appreciated by; words describing. See also Virtuous
Circle Turnover rates, low

Uncertainty: destabilizing effect of; faced in hiking experience; inevitability of.
See also Finding opportunities in uncertainty Understanding, promoted through
sharing information

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V

Values: core; inclusion through belief in, of others; revealed by experiences Van
Gorder, Chris
Virtuous Circle: creating your own; hiking experience example of; at Hoar
Construction; leaders exhibiting qualities of; overview of; at REI; at Wegmans.

Volunteer service

W

W. L. Gore & Associates
Walton, Linda
Warmenhoven, Dan
Wegman, Colleen
Wegman, Danny
Wegman, Robert
Wegmans
Weis, Shirley
Welch, Jack
Wisdom, applied when dealing with uncertainty

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