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Table of Contents
                            The Time Traveler’s Wife
	
		PROLOGUE
		
		I
		THE MAN OUT OF TIME
		FIRST DATE, ONE
		A FIRST TIME FOR EVERYTHING
		FIRST DATE, TWO
		LESSONS IN SURVIVAL
		AFTER THE END
		CHRISTMAS EVE, ONE ALWAYS CRASHING IN THE SAME CAR
		CHRISTMAS EVE, TWO
		EAT OR BE EATEN
		CHRISTMAS EVE, THREE
		HOME IS ANYWHERE YOU HANG YOUR HEAD
		BIRTHDAY
		BETTER LIVING THROUGH CHEMISTRY
		TURNING POINT
		GET ME TO THE CHURCH ON TIME
		II
		A DROP OF BLOOD
		IN A BOWL OF MILK
		MARRIED LIFE
		LIBRARY SCIENCE FICTION
		A VERY SMALL SHOE
		ONE
		TWO
		INTERMEZZO
		NEW YEAR’S EVE, ONE
		THREE
		FOUR
		FIVE
		SIX
		BABY DREAMS
		SEVEN
		ALBA, AN INTRODUCTION
		BIRTHDAY
		SECRET
		EXPERIENCING TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES
		NATURE MORTE
		BIRTHDAY
		SECRET
		THE EPISODE OF THE MONROE STREET PARKING GARAGE
		BIRTHDAY
		AN UNPLEASANT SCENE
		THE EPISODE OF THE MONROE STREET PARKING GARAGE
		FRAGMENTS
		FEET DREAMS
		WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND
		HOURS, IF NOT DAYS
		NEW YEAR’S EVE, TWO
		
		III
		A TREATISE ON LONGING
		DISSOLUTION
		DASEIN
		RENASCENCE
		ALWAYS AGAIN
		ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

When Henry meets Clare, he is twenty-eight and she
is twenty. He is a hip librarian; she is a beautiful art
student. Henry has never met Clare before; Clare has
known Henry since she was six...


“A powerfully original love story. BOTTOM LINE: Amazing trip.”

—PEOPLE


“To those who say there are no new love stories, I heartily recommend

The Time Traveler’s Wife, an enchanting novel, which is beautifully
crafted and as dazzlingly imaginative as it is dizzyingly romantic.”

—SCOTT TUROW




AUDREY NIFFENEGGER’S innovative debut, The Time Traveler’s Wife, is the story, of Clare, a beautiful art student, and
Henry, an adventuresome librarian, who have known each other since Clare was six and Henry was thirty-six, and were
married when Clare was twenty-three and Henry thirty-one. Impossible but true, because Henry is one of the first people
diagnosed with Chrono-Displacement Disorder: periodically his genetic clock resets and he finds himself misplaced in
time, pulled to moments of emotional gravity from his life, past and future. His disappearances are spontaneous, his
experiences unpredictable, alternately harrowing and amusing.



The Time Traveler’s Wife depicts the effects of time travel on Henry and Clare’s marriage and their passionate love for
each other, as the story unfolds from both points of view. Clare and Henry attempt to live normal lives, pursuing familiar
goals— steady jobs, good friends, children of their own. All of this is threatened by something they can neither prevent
nor control, making their story intensely moving and entirely unforgettable.



THE TIME TRAVELER’S WIFE

a novel by Audrey Niffenegger




Clock time is our bank manager, tax collector, police inspector;
this inner time is our wife.

—J. B. Priestley, Man and Time

Page 126

“Do something for me?”

“Anything.”

“Cut him off. No more drugs. Drugs aren’t going to work.”

Ben grins at me, relieved. “Just say no.”

“Exactly.” We laugh. Ben sits with me for a while. When he gets up to leave, he takes my hand and says, “Thank you

for being kind about it. He could easily have died.”

“But he didn’t.”

“No, he didn’t.”

“See you at the wedding.”

“Yes.” We are standing in the hall. In the glaring fluorescent light Ben looks tired and ill. He ducks his head and turns,

and walks down the hall, and I turn back to the dim room where Henry lies sleeping.



TURNING POINT

Friday, October 22, 1993 (Henry is 30)



HENRY: I am strolling down Linden Street, in South Haven, at large for an hour while Clare and her mother do something

at the florist’s. The wedding is tomorrow, but as the groom I don’t seem to have too many responsibilities. Be there; that’s

the main item on my To Do list. Clare is constantly being whisked away to fittings, consultations, bridal showers. When I

do see her she always looks rather wistful.

It’s a clear cold day, and I dawdle. I wish South Haven had a decent bookstore. Even the library consists mainly of

Barbara Cartland and John Grisham. I have the Penguin edition of Kleist with me, but I’m not in the mood. I pass an

antiques shop, a bakery, a bank, another antiques shop. As I walk by the barber shop I peer in; there’s an old man being

shaved by a dapper little balding barber, and I know at once what I’m going to do.

Little bells clang against the door as I walk into the shop. It smells of soap, steam, hair lotion, and elderly flesh.

Everything is pale green. The chair is old and ornate with chrome, and there are elaborate bottles lining dark wooden

shelves, and trays of scissors, combs, and razors. It’s almost

medical; it’s very Norman Rockwell. The barber glances up at me. “Haircut?” I ask. He nods at the row of empty

straight-backed chairs with magazines neatly stacked on a rack at one end of the row. Sinatra is playing on the radio. I sit

down and leaf through a copy of Reader’s Digest. The barber wipes traces of lather from the old man’s chin, and applies

aftershave. The old man climbs gingerly from the chair and pays up. The barber helps him into his coat and hands him his

cane. “See you, George,” says the old man as he creeps out. ‘“Bye, Ed,” replies the barber. He turns his attention to me.

“What’ll it be?” I hop into the chair and he steps me up a few inches and swivels me around to face the mirror. I take a

long last look at my hair. I hold my thumb and forefinger about an inch apart. “Cut it all off.” He nods his approval and ties

a plastic cape around my neck. Soon his scissors are flashing little metal on metal noises around my head, and my hair is

falling to the floor. When he is done he brushes me off and removes the cape and voila, I’ve become the me of my future.

Page 252

COPYRIGHT NOTICE



MacAdam/Cage • 155 Sansome Street, Suite 550 • San Francisco, CA 94104 Copyright © 2003 by Audrey Niffenegger

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Library of Congress Cataloging-in Publication Data Niffenegger, Audrey.

The time traveler’s wife / by Audrey Niffenegger. p. cm.

ISBN 1-931561-64-8



1. Time travel—Fiction.

2. Married people—Fiction. I. Title. PS3564.I362T56 2003

813’54-dc21 2003010159



Manufactured in the United States of America



10 9876543



Book design by Dorothy Carico Smith.



Publisher’s Note. This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the author’s

imagination or are used fictitiously Any resemblance to actual events, locales, or persons, living or dead, is entirely

coincidental.



PERMISSIONS



Excerpt from Man & Time by J.B Priestley Copyright ©1964, Aldus Books Used by permission of Stanford Educational

Corporation (formerly Ferguson Publishing Company). 200 West Jackson Boulevard. Chicago, IL 60606.



“Love After Love” from Collected Poems 1948-1984 by Derek Walcott. Copyright ©1986 by Derek Walcott Used by

permission of Farrar. Straus and Giroux, LLC.



Excerpts from the ‘Duino Elegies’ and from “Going Blind , copyright ©1982 by Stephen Mitchell, from The Selected Poetry

of Rattier Maria Rtlke by Rainer Maria Rilke, translated by Stephen Mitchell, copyright ©1982 by Stephen Mitchell Used

by permission of Random House, Inc.



Excerpt from Gone Daddy Gone/I lust Want To Make Love To You‘“ written by Gordon Gano and Willie Dixon ©1980.

Gorno Music (ASCAP) and Hoochie Coochie Music (BM1) Used by permission from Gorno Music (administered by Alan

N Skiena, Esq ) and Hoochie Coochie Music (administered by Bug Music) For additional information on the genre of the

blues please contact: The Blues Heaven Foundation (Founded by Willie Dixon in 1981) 2120 S. Michigan Avenue,

Chicago. IL 60616 (312) 808-1286.www.bluesheaven.com



Excerpt from “Gimme The Car” written by Gordon Gano ©1980, Gorno Music (ASCAP) Used by permission from Gorno

Music Administered by Alan N Skiena, Esq.



Excerpt from “Add It Up‘ written by Gordon Gano © 1980, Gorno Music (ASCAP) Used by permission from Gorno Music.

Administered by Alan N Skiena, Esq.

Page 253

References to pharmaceutical products credited to the 2000 edition of the Physicians’ Desk Reference Used by
permission of Thomson Medical Economics.


Lines by Emily Dickinson reprinted by permission of the publishers and the Trustees of Amherst College from The Poems
of Emily Dickinson, Ralph W Franklin, ed., Cambridge. Mass The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Copyright
©1998 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College Copyright ©1951, 1955,1979 by the President and Fellows of
Harvard College


Quotations from the Dictionary of Given Names by Flora Haines Loughead Copyright ©1933 Used by permission of the
Arthur H. Clark Company


Excerpt from “Pussy Power” written by Iggy Pop Copyright ©1990 James Osterberg Music (BMI)/Administered by BUG All
rights reserved Used By Permission


Excerpt from “Yellow Submarine” copyright ©1966 (Renewed) Sony/ATV Tunes LLC. All rights administered by Sony/ATV
Music Publishing, 8 Music Square West, Nashville, TN 37203. All rights reserved Used by permission


Excerpt from Homer The Odyssey translated by Robert Fitzgerald Copyright ©1961, 1963 by Robert Fitzgerald Copyright
renewed 1989 by Benedict R C Fitzgerald, on behalf of the Fitzgerald children Used by permission of Farrar, Straus and
Giroux, LLC

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