Download The superior person’s book of words PDF

TitleThe superior person’s book of words
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size5.7 MB
Total Pages180
Table of Contents
                            D
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

/

contraindicated

T H E S U P E R I O R P E R S O N ' S
B O O K OF W O R D S

jugulation

P E T E R B O W L E R

Page 90

they used to take an interest in lapidation but have
had difficulty in finding a suitable subject - perhaps
she might find the time to oblige?

LEMAN n. Paramour (q.v.); lover; inamorata (or, for that
matter, inamorato - but the female sense, of mistress,
has for some reason become the more common in
recent times). May be pronounced lemon, leeman, or
even, according to one of the author’s sources, lay­
man. The first and third of these pronunciations
offer obvious opportunities.

LESION n. The Superior Person’s word for a scratch, cut,
bruise, abrasion, sore, or pimple.

LETHOLOGICA and LET HON OMIA n. The former is the
inability to recall the right word, the latter the
inability to recall the right name. The reader who
suffers from either (or, like the author, both) of these
conditions should practice saying, ‘Excuse my letho-
logica/lethonomia’; this is distinctly preferable to
saying, ‘It’s on the tip of my tongue ...,’ but, unfor­
tunately, also distinctly harder - in fact, almost
impossible for one who suffers from the condition(s)
in question.

LEXIPHANIC a. 'Given to the use of pretentious terminol­
ogy, such as the word lexiphanic.

LIMACEOUS a. Sluglike, having to do with slugs. ‘Keep
your hands to yourself, you limaceous endomorph!’

LIMPOPO n. A river, otherwise known (for obvious rea­
sons) as the Crocodile River, in southern Africa.

78

Page 91

Alternatively (without the initial capital), the avocado,
a pear-shaped tropical fruit, otherwise known as the
alligator pear. This usage derives not from the
connection between Crocodile River and alligator
pear but from the writings of Kipling, whose phrase
‘the great, grey, green, greasy Limpopo’ is so exactly
indicative of the nature of the fruit. The avocado
had just been introduced into London at the time
Kipling was writing his Jungle Book, and his
description of the Limpopo is said to have been
devised as a private joke for the amusement of two
friends in whose presence he had first sampled the
fruit in question and found it quite disgusting.

LIPPITUDE n. A bleary-eyed condition. Goes well with
lucifugous (q.v.) in descriptions of morning-after
symptoms.

LUBRICITY n. Lasciviousness, lewdness, oiliness. A mar­
velously nasty word. Can be used nonpejoratively to
mean smoothness, or slipperiness, e.g., of fate - but
why waste such an insinuative word on such mun­
dane uses?

LUCIFUGOUS a. Avoiding daylight. A botanical term.
‘I’m afraid John’s not up yet, Mrs. Applecore; he
overindulged somewhat last night, and the poor dear
is distinctly lucifugous this morning.’

LUCRIPETOUS a. Money-hungry. Goes rather nicely
with nummamorous (q.v.). Both words are suitable
for muttered aspersions upon the motives of used-
car salesmen, estate agents, funeral directors, and
their ilk, when in their presence.

7 9

Similer Documents