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                            The Roles of Religious Coping, World Assumptions, and Personal Growth in College Student Bereavement
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Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Scholars Compass VCU Scholars Compass

Theses and Dissertations Graduate School

2010

The Roles of Religious Coping, World Assumptions, and Personal The Roles of Religious Coping, World Assumptions, and Personal

Growth in College Student Bereavement Growth in College Student Bereavement

Benjamin Lord
Virginia Commonwealth University

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1





College of Humanities and Sciences
Virginia Commonwealth University



This is to certify that the thesis prepared by Benjamin D. Lord entitled The Roles of Religious
Coping, World Assumptions, and Personal Growth in College Student Bereavement has been
approved by his committee as satisfactory completion of the thesis requirement for the degree of
Master of Science.




Sandra Gramling, Ph.D., Director of Thesis
Department of Psychology




Wendy L. Kliewer, Ph.D., Committee Member
Department of Psychology




Everett Worthington, Ph.D., Committee Member
Department of Psychology




Clifford Edwards, Ph.D., Committee Member
School of World Studies




Wendy L. Kliewer, Ph.D., Director of Graduate Studies




Fred Hawkridge, Ph.D., Interim Dean, College of Humanities and Sciences




F. Douglas Boudinot, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School





Date

Page 66

54



Table 1

Frequencies and percentages for demographic variables
Variable Frequency Percentage
Gender
Male 83 37.4
Female 139 62.6
Class Rank
Freshman 85 38.3
Sophomore 62 27.9
Junior 39 17.6
Senior 32 14.4
Graduate 1 .5
Other 3 1.4
Marital Status
Single 175 78.8
Married 3 1.4
Divorced 2 .9
Long-Term 32 14.4
Living Together 9 4.1
Separated 1 .5
Religion
Christian 150 67.6
Muslim 11 5.0
Jewish 3 1.4
Hindu 3 1.4
Atheist 31 14.0
Agnostic 12 5.4
Other 12 5.4
Ethnicity
Caucasian 116 52.3
Black American 52 23.4
Hispanic 10 4.5
Asian 24 10.8
Middle-Eastern 4 1.8
Mixed Heritage 6 2.7
Other 6 2.7
SES
Low 24 10.8
Low-Middle 31 14.0
Middle 79 35.6
High-Middle 64 28.8
High 24 10.8

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55




Characteristics of loss.

Frequencies were also calculated for two important factors regarding the

ummarizes the frequency data

for these variables.

Table 2

Frequencies and percentages for characteristics of the loss event

Variable Frequency Percentage

Circumstance

Suicide 14 6.3

Homicide 12 5.4

Illness 143 64.4

Accident 53 23.9

Relationship

Friend 75 33.8

Nuclear 12 5.4

Extended 123 55.4

Spouse 4 1.8

Other 8 3.6

Note. All percentage values are calculated out of a sample of N=222. There was no
missing data present for the frequencies above.

As indicated in Table 2, the current sample has experienced the loss of a variety

of attachment figures in a variety of circumstances. The most common circumstance of

Page 132

120



Appendix F

Spiritual Well-Being Scale



For each of the following statements, circle the choice that best indicates the extent of your agreement or

disagreement as it describes your personal experience.



SA = Strongly Agree D = Disagree MA = Moderately Agree

MD = Moderately Disagree A = Agree SD = Strongly

Disagree



1. SA MA A D MD SD*


2. SA MA A D MD SD
or where I am going.



3. I believe that God loves me and cares about me. SA MA A D MD SD*


4. I fee like life is a positive experience. SA MA A D MD SD


5. I believe that God is impersonal and not interested SA MA A D MD SD*
in my daily situations.



6. I feel unsettled about my future. SA MA A D MD SD


7. I have a personally meaningful relationship with God. SA MA A D MD SD*


8. I feel very fulfilled and satisfied with life. SA MA A D MD SD


9. SA MA A D MD SD*
from my God.



10. I feel a sense of well-being about the direction SA MA A D MD SD
my life is headed in.



11. I believe that God is concerned about my problems. SA MA A D MD SD*


12. SA MA A D MD SD


13. SA MA A D MD SD*


14. I feel good about my future. SA MA A D MD SD


15. My relationship with God helps me not feel lonely. SA MA A D MD SD*


16. I fee l that life is full of conflict and unhappiness. SA MA A D MD SD


17. on SA MA A D MD SD*
with God.



18. SA MA A D MD SD


19. My relation with God contributes to my sense of SA MA A D MD SD*
well-being.



20. I believe there is some real purpose for my life. SA MA A D MD SD

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121



Vita





Benjamin D. Lord was born on September 25, 1985, in Bethesda Naval Hospital in
Bethesda, Maryland, and is an American citizen. He graduated from Chancellor High School,
Fredericksburg, Virginia in 2003. He received his Bachelor of Science in Psychology from
Longwood University, Farmville, Virginia in 2007 and now attends Virginia Commonwealth
University, Richmond, Virginia. He is working towards a Doctor of Philosophy degree in
Clinical Psychology with a concentration in Behavioral Medicine, and has worked as a teaching
assistant for three years while completing coursework. While completing his degree, he has also
presented posters at three conferences, and has worked as a student therapist at the Center for
Psychological Services and Development, Richmond, Virginia, and as part of the Virginia
Commonwealth University Medical Center Primary Care Psychology Service.

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