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THE PREDICTIVE VALIDITY OF LEARNING POTENTIAL AND
PERSONALITY FOR WORK PERFORMANCE IN A PUBLIC

SECTOR DEPARTMENT



by



ERIC MUTHUNDINNE MASHAU




submitted in part fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of



MASTER OF COMMERCE



in the subject



INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANISATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY




at the



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA




SUPERVISOR: MS N N BEKWA


15 SEPTEMBER 2015

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The author would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge those who offered their

unwavering support and encouragement towards the completion of this dissertation.



Ms Nomvuyo Bekwa, for providing such professional supervision, words of encouragement

and constructive feedback.

Mr and Mrs Mashau, whose teaching about the value of education has found fertile ground in

me.

My wife Agnes and my children, Eric Jnr, Renda and Mulisa, whose time I have stolen to

complete this dissertation.

Mr Melven Muthobi and Dr Nontu Shongwe, for providing support during the process of data

gathering for this research.

Mr Andries Masenge, for his assistance with statistics for this research.

Dr Melvin Rammbuda and Mr Avhashoni Ramikosi, to whom I will always be indebted for

their role in my tertiary education.

Yashu Club, for giving me so many reasons as to why I should complete this project.

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Figure 2.5: Sink and Tuttle model (Tangen, 2004).



• Profitability

Many organisations exist to make profits for their own shareholders; if the organisation fails

to make a profit it ceases to exist.

This model is criticised for its lack of flexibility which characterises our modern economy. It

is also silent about customer perspectives (Tangen, 2004).



2.4.3.5 Medori and Steeple’s framework

Medori and Steeple’s (2000) performance measurement model (Figure 2.6 below) proposed

an integrated framework structure that consisted of a six-stage plan for auditing:

Stage 1: Company success factors: the framework begins with the outlining of organisational

strategy and its success factor, the intention being to create compatibility between

organisational strategy and performance management.

Upstream system Input
Transformation

process
Output

Downstream
System

3. Quality

1. Effectiveness
6. Innovations

5. Quality of work life

2. Efficiency

4. Productivity

7. Profitability/
Budgetability

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Stage 2: Performance measurement grid: this stage involves matching competitive priorities

to strategic requirements

Stage 3: Selection of measures: this is accomplished using the existing checklist which

contains 105 measures; the checklist is debated for the selection of the most appropriate

measure (Medori & Steeple, 2000; Tangen, 2004).



Figure 2.6: Medori and Steeple’s framework (Medori & Steeple, 2000).

Stage 4: Audit: the stage involves the review of the organisation’s existing performance

measurement system; both existing and new measures are compared in the following manner:

1. The old measures that remain congruent with new ones continue to be utilised but if

not they are discarded

2. However, new measures that are not congruent with the selected measures are also

retained and viewed as measures of gaps – these gaps are regarded as important for

future success (Medori & Steeple, 2000).

Stage 5: Implementation of measures: This is the crucial stage of a performance management

system as all measures selected are implemented.

Stage 1

Company
Success
Factors

Stage 2

Performance
measurement

grid

Stage 3

Selection of
measures

Stage 4

Audit

Stage 5

Implementation

Stage 6

Performance maintenance

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