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TitleThe New Forest--A Personal View by C. A. Brebbia
LanguageEnglish
File Size6.2 MB
Total Pages130
Table of Contents
                            Title Page
Copyright Page
Contents
Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
Preface
Introduction
A Bit of History
	The New Forest before the Normans
	The Normans and afterwards
The Inhabitants
	The Forest People
	A Curious Visitor
	The Ponies
	The Deer
My Favourite Places
	Lyndhurst
	Minstead
	Fritham
	Burley
	Burley Hill
	Rhinefield House
	Brockenhurst
	New Park
	Christchurch
	Highcliffe Castle
	Hurst Castle
	Lymington
	Boldre
	Beaulieu
	Buckler's Hard
	Park Hill
	Ashurst Lodge
Bibliography
Appendix
	English Monarchs from the Norman Conquest to the Present Day
Map of the Forest
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

The
New

Forest
A Personal View by C.A. Brebbia

New_ForestP_Prel 9/4/08 9:47 am Page i

Page 65

after losing a court case against the local vicar, decided to move on. Colonel
W.C.D. Esdaile brought the house in 1852 but rebuilt it in the pseudo-
Elizabethan style so popular at the time. This is basically the house that is still
standing. When Colonel Esdaile died, the manor was left in trust to his niece and
finally sold after her death and the expiration of the lease. After extension and
alterations, the manor was converted into the Burley Manor Hotel in 1933.

In addition to the manor house now converted into a hotel, the village has a
few other interesting sites.

The church itself, although appearing older, dates from 1839 and was built on
land donated by the Lefevre family. The Queen’s Head pub is most probably the
oldest house in Burley and its connections with the smuggling trade were
confirmed by the discovery in recent years of a cellar containing pistols, old coins
and bottles.

Another place of interest in Burley is the shop called A Coven of Witches. It
was opened by Sybil Leek, who in the 1950s was the village witch and she started
a coven in the Forest, which I believe, is still active today. She used to wear a long
black coat and carry a crow on her shoulder and was versed in the ways of the
Forest and the gypsies. She decided to emigrate to California, where she became
a well-known witch and wrote several books on witchcraft. A picture of her is
displayed in the fireplace of her old shop.

Sybil Leek has been described as “the world’s most celebrated witch” of her
time. She claimed descent from a family of witches on her maternal side and
from an early age knew that she possessed special powers. Her ancestors could be
traced back to southern Ireland and included the famous witch Molly Leigh, who
died in 1663 and is buried just on the edge of St John’s Church graveyard in
Burslem, Staffordshire. Sybil’s father was a gentle scholar to whom she owed
most of her education. He was by trade a civil engineer with roots in Imperial
Russia.

At an early age she was initiated as a high priestess in a coven in France and
shortly after moved with her family to the New Forest. She wrote:

48

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Page 66

In Lyndhurst, the Queen Town of the New Forest, I became friendly with the
Romanies, the wandering tribes who lived by their own laws and despised the
“gorgios” (people of non-gypsy origin)…It did not take me long to see that
with these gypsy tribes the elements of the Old Religion still survived.

Sybil lived with the gypsies for about a year during which she learnt how they use
witchcraft and the secrets of the Forest. They knew about the properties and
powers of herbs and the ways of the animals of the Forest.

The gypsies did not take part in the organized Sabbats held in the New Forest
by the four covens that have been in existence since William Rufus was killed.
When the religious days came along the gypsies would leave me alone and I

49

The Coven of Witches Shop of Sybil
Leek, the Burley Village Witch.
[photo from the author’s collection]

New_ForestP_31-112 9/4/08 11:12 am Page 49

Page 129

SO
U THAM

PTO
N W

ATER

T H
E

S O
L E

N T

P O O L E B A Y

N E W F O R E S T

SOUTHAMPTON

ISLE OF WIGHT

LYNDHURST

BURLEY

NEW MILTONCHRISTCHURCH

BOURNEMOUTH

RINGWOOD

FORDINGBRIDGE

LYMINGTON

BEAULIEU

TOTTONCADNAM

KEYHAVEN

Hurst Castle

HIGHCLIFFE

EVERTON

Sway
Tower

Bucklands
Rings

BOLDRE

HURN

Park Hill

MINSTEAD

Ashurst
Lodge

FRITHAM

Rufus
Stone

New
Park

Rhinefield
House

BUCKLER’S
HARD

Calshot

ASHURST

BROCKENHURST

� �
��







D
rive

O
r namental

M27

M27

M3

M27

M271A36

A36

A35

A337

A27

A35

A31

A31

A337

A336

A3090
A3057

A337
A338

A338

A334

A3025

A338A348

A3060

A326

B3347

B3073

B3078

B3078

B3081

B3079

B3055

B3054

B3058

B3055

B3056
B3054

A337

Ashurst
(New Forest) Stn

Beaulieu Road Stn

Brockenhurst
Stn

Totton
Stn

Southampton
Airport Stn

Southampton
Central Stn

Lymington
Town Stn

New Milton
Stn

Christchurch
Stn

Bournemouth
International

Airport

Bournemouth
Stn

J1

J2 J3 J4
J5

To Salisbury

To Poole

To Salisbury To Romsey To Winchester
& London

To
Portsmouth

Page 130

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Tradition Today
Edited by: R. ADAM, Robert Adam Architects, UK and
M. HARDY, INTBAU, London, UK

In January 2002, after a two year gestation period, the International Network
for Traditional Buildings, Architecture and Urbanism (INTBAU) was launched.
To celebrate the launch, a conference was held to debate the place of tradition
in modern society. While INTBAU was specifically concerned with building
and urbanism, if tradition was indeed relevant then it must have a place through-
out society. The conference forms the basis of this book.

It is an important feature of traditions that they adapt and change. So, while
change accelerates so should the adaptation of traditions. If we rely on tradition
for the transmission of culture, then the adaptation of traditions is a matter of
importance to all of us. If change occurs without the transmission of culture,
then culture itself dies; culture cannot be created anew every day. The evolu-
tionary nature of tradition is something often ignored by supporters and op-
ponents alike. It is important that history – that which measures our distance
from the past – is not confused with tradition – the past living through us.

The papers presented in this book discuss these points and many others are
a fascinating miscellany. With contributions ranging from the practical to the
academic these papers can leave no doubt about the continued role and sig-
nificance of tradition, the passion of those who understand its relevance and the
dangers inherent in its denial.

ISBN: 978-1-84564-066-8

Published 2008, 160pp
£29.50/US$59.00/€44.50

Patagonia,
a Forgotten Land
From Magellan to Peron
C.A. BREBBIA, Wessex Institute
of Technology, UK

This book describes the history of Patagonia from its discovery by Magellan
to recent times. Sinceits early exploration Patagonia has been associated with
conditions of extreme hardship and suffering. Men and ships were lost in the
dangerous waters of the Straits of Tierra del Fuego, giving rise to tales of
mysterious cities populated by the shipwrecked sailors of the many failed
expeditions.

Early Spanish attempts to colonize Patagonia also ended in failure and the
region remained largely uninhabited until the arrival of the Welsh in 1865.
Their peaceful coexistence with the natives ended abruptly when the Argentine
Army entered Patagonia and took over the Indian lands, which were promptly
distributed to new settlers.

As a new and anarchic society, Patagonia could not fail to attract its share of
desperados and adventurers, the most notorious of which are described in the
book, including gold prospectors, hunters and bandits such as Butch Cassidy
andthe Sundance Kid.

The volume also relates the anarchist’s struggles that took place in Patagonia
at the beginning of the 1900s and the failed attempt by Peron’s government
to convert Argentina to a nuclear power.

The book conveys the image of Patagonia as still a largely unknown and
forbidding place. Five hundred years of recorded history have not dispelled
the image of Patagonia being a new frontier.

Contents: Contents: Contents: Contents: Contents: EARLY HOPES AND TRIBULATIONS – Magellan, A man of des-
tiny; More ill fated expeditions; Enter Drake; Enter the British, follow the Dutch;
IN SEARCH OF DREAMS – The laboratory of mankind; The extraordinary trip
of Musters; The city of the Cesares; The man who would be king; CLAIMING
THE LAND – Convicts and Adventures, the story of Punta Arenas; Little Wales
across the sea; THE CONQUEST OF SOULS – The Falkland/Malvinas dis-
pute; The Patagonia Missionary Society; The visions of Don Bosco; CONQUER-
ING THE WILDERNESS – The Indian wars; The young explorers; EXILES,
ADVENTURERS AND OUTLAWS – The Argentine Australia; The gold rush
and the story of Popper; The desperadoes; THE FURIOUS AND THE FOOLISH
– The anarchists of Patagonia; Its atomic secret.

ISBN: 978-1-84564-061-3

Published 2007, 384pp
£33.00/US$59.00/€49.50

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