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TitleThe Judge Advocate General's School, 1951-1961
LanguageEnglish
File Size8.2 MB
Total Pages106
Table of Contents
                            COVER PAGE
FOREWORD
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER I - The History of the School Prior to 1951
CHAPTER II - The Establishment of The Judge Advocate General's School
CHAPTER III - The Academic Department, 1951-1961
CHAPTER IV - Reserve Activities and Plans Department, 1951-1961
CHAPTER V - Special Projects and Publications Department, 1951-1961
CHAPTER VI - Office of the School Secretary, 1951-1961
APPENDICES
	APPENDIX I - Department of the Army Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4, Logistics, Washington 25, D.C.
	APPENDIX II
	APPENDIX III - Organizational Chart of School, 1951
	APPENDIX IV - Organizational Chart of School, 1961
	APPENDIX V - Organizational Roster of School, 30 June 1961
	APPENDIX VI - Courses Offered at School, and Number of Students, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX VII - Roster of Career Course Students, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX VIII - List of Courses Offered, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX IX - List of Guest Speakers, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX X - Boards of Visitors, 1953-1961
	APPENDIX XI - Publications of School, 1951 -1961
	APPENDIX XII - Allied Officers Enrolled in the Advanced and Special Classes
	APPENDIX XIII - Staff and Faculty of School of School, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX X - Enlisted Personnel of School, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX XV - Civilian Personnel of School, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX XVI - Commandants of School, 1951-1961
	APPENDIX XVII - Departments and Agencies of the Federal Government Represented by Students at School, 1951-1961
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

THE JUDGE ADVOCATE


GENERAL'S SCHOOL

1951 - 1961

The Judge Advocate General's School


United States Army


Charlottesville, Virginia

Page 2

FOREWORD


The fudge Advocate Cenera'l's School, 1951-1961, is a record of
the events which transpired at the School during the first ten years
of its existence in Charlottesville, Virginia. This history traces the
evolution of the School as an institution, emphasizing the develop­
ment of its curriculum and organization.

This history is published for the purpose of creating, together
with the Commandant's Annual Reports, a record of the establish­
ment of the School; its staff and faculty, students, and enlisted per­
sonnel; its operation; and its course structure.

The establishment of The Judge Advocate General's School as a
permanent part of both the Judge Advocate General's Corps and
the Army school system was an unprecedented step of great fore­
sight. The record of the School's achievement in military legal
education is ample justification for this conclusion and is also a
glowing tribute to the personnel assigned to the School during its
first decade.

While every effort has been made to make this history as accurate
as possible, the absence of complete records of some activities may
have resulted in inadvertent omissions. In any case, the School would
appreciate receipt of information which would enable the official
record to be corrected.

?J7.~
JOHN F. T. MURRAY
Colonel, fACC
Commandant

i

Page 53

indicated that a need for such a system might exist, many problems
as to feasibility, programming and utilization in this highly complex,
dynamically changing area of study, remained unsolved in ] 961. This
program became a continuing study by the department.

During the entire period of this history, the department shared
with the Academic Department the responsibility for the planning
and execution of the LOGEX exercises (for discussion of LOGEX,
see Chapter III, supra).

During 1951-1961, the Special Projects and Publications Depart­
ment filled the great need of officers in the field for guidance in
practical procedures. The imagination, scholarly researchv and
practicality blended together by the department in producing ma­
terials to guide judge advocate officers in the field indicated that
the department recognized the School's responsibility as a military
law center with an obligation to contribute to the development of
military law. The 1960 "Report of the Board of Visitors," in dis­
cussing this department, said its special "... tasks, together with
the production of several regular publications and the organization
of periodical events, made this department one of the most important
units in the Judge Advocate General's Corps."

In 1954 the department was summed up in these words, "This
activity is not only analogous to a bar research center, but it is
also a legal service center for military lawyers."

American Bar Association President David Maxwell Attended Dedi­
cation of the School's New Building.

44

Page 54

CHAPTER VI

OFFICE OF THE SCHOOL SECRETARY, 1951-1961

A. ORGANIZATION

In 1951, upon the founding of the School, the Executive Office
was established to deal with all the administrative aspects of the
School's operation. On I October 1955, this office was redesignated
the Administrative and Management Office, and on 23 September
1959 the Administrative and Management Office was redesignated
the Office of the School Secretary. Notwithstanding its title changes,
the functions of this office remained substantially the same from
1951 to 1961.

B. FUNCTIONS

A functional chart, prepared in 1955, provides a good description
of the responsibilities of the Office of the School Secretary and its
predecessors during the entire period. This chart, describing this
office, said: The School Secretary "formulates policies and advises
the Commandant on personnel and administration; conducts the
official correspondence of the [S]chool; maintains the office of records
of the [S]chool and administers the records retirement program;
supervises the coordination of all actions of all civilian personnel;
disseminates and controls all classified material; handles all matters
pertaining to housekeeping; handles all matters pertaining to the
program for permanent party personnel; serves as PIO; handles all
matters pertaining to budget, fiscal, personnel control and utilization;
handles all matters pertaining to supply; and accomplishes special
assignments and missions as directed by the Commandant."

C. ADMINISTRATION

In its administrative capacity the Office of the School Secretary
supervised such administrative items as mail (approximately 10,000
pieces each month), the weekly bulletin, transportation, reproduc­
tion, and the multitudinous other administrative functions of the
School. Other functions common to every Army installation, such as
voting officer, public information officer, and contracting officer, were
similarly vested in the School Secretary and his staff.

The School Secretary also had many duties in connection with the
organizational structure of the School and its personnel activities.
The School grew from an original table of distribution strength of
34 military and 25 civilian spaces (TD 92-8585, dated 28 July 1951)
to an authorized strength in June 1961 of 41 officers, I warrant of­
ficer, 7 enlisted personnel, and 31 civilians. (Actual strength, 42
officers, I warrant officer, 5 enlisted personnel, and 30 civilians.)

45

Page 105

APPENDIX XVII

DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES OF THE FEDERAL


GOVERNMENT REPRESENTED BY STUDENTS AT THE


JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL'S SCHOOL, 1951-1961*

Departments and Agencies

Department of Defense

Number
of Students

Department of Defense
United States Air Force
United States Army
United States Marine Corps
United States Navy

5
78

1327
4

161

Other Departments

Departmen t of Commerce
Department of the Interior

1
3

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 1
Department of Justice 18
Department of State 2
Post Office Department 15

Agencies

Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals 3
Army and Air Force Exchange Service I
Atomic Energy Commission I
Bureau of Census I
Bureau of Public Roads,

Department of Commerce 5
Coast and Geodetic Survey,

Department of Commerce 1
Federal Aviation Agency 2
Federal Communications Commission 1
Federal Maritime Board 1
Federal Trade Commission 2
General Services Administration 18

.. This list does not include personnel of United States Government Agencies
attending the USAR Judge Advocate Refresher Course or the National Guard
Judge Advocate Refresher Course in attendance solely to satisfy reserve component
obligations, nor does it include students attending the Advanced or Special Courses.

96

Page 106

Department and Agencies Number
of Students

Agencies (continued)

International Cooperation Administration 2
Maritime Administration,

Department of Commerce 5
Military Sea Transportation Service 2
National Aeronautics and Space Administration 12
National Security Agency 11
Panama Canal Company 1
Small Business Administration 9
United States General Accounting Office 19
United States Immigration and Naturalization 1

Service
United States Veterans Administration 1

Foreign Government Agencies

Department of National Defense (Canada)

TOTAL 1715

97

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