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TitleThe Influence of Personal Achievement Goals on Post-Training Self-Efficacy
LanguageEnglish
File Size627.5 KB
Total Pages165
Document Text Contents
Page 1

ABSTRACT



FREEMAN, EARL WAYNE. Training Effectiveness: The Influence of Personal
Achievement Goals on Post-Training Self-Efficacy. (Under the direction of Michael
Vasu and Timothy Hatcher.)


The purpose of the present study was to better understand how individual

achievement goal orientations affect changes in post-training self-efficacy. Self-efficacy

is positively related to the transfer of learning to the workplace and is therefore an

indicator of training effectiveness. A

was used to study a sample of employees of homeless service

organizations. Sixty one individuals were in the control group and one hundred and

seventeen individuals attended a HUD-funded training in financial management and were

in the treatment group. Three categories of individual goal orientation - mastery,

performance-approach, and performance-avoid - served as independent variables, while

changes in post-training self-efficacy served as the dependent variable. Covariates

assessed included transfer system variables (the opportunity to use learning, motivation to

transfer, and supervisory support) and demographic variables (age, years employed,

organization type, job type, and education level).

The present study revealed that individual goal orientations were not significantly

related and did not significantly predict any variation in changes in post-training self-

efficacy. Only two covariates – group membership and pre-training self-efficacy – were

significant and contributed to the prediction of change in post-training self-efficacy. The

recommendations presented include: 1) postpone the decision to further research the

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Table 6. Variable Distribution

Variable Skewness Kurtosis
SE1 .547 -.454
SE2 1.461 3.117
SE3 1.262 1.303
SE4 1.178 2.265
SE5 .862 1.418
SE6 1.279 2.672
SE7 .707 .916
SE8 .863 1.234
SE9 .662 .838
SE10 1.439 2.103
SE11 .997 .707
GOM1 -.461 -.639
GOM2 -1.093 -.111
GOM3 -1.597 .557
GOP1 -.927 .047
GOP2 -.572 -.813
GOP3 -.244 -1.073
GOA1 -.251 -1.354
GOA2 -.241 -1.306
GOA3 -.319 -1.261
OU1 -.904 .321
OU2 -.630 -.296
OU3 -.446 -.496
OU4 -.263 -.980
MO1 -.469 -.663
MO2 -.091 -.461
MO3 -.258 -.799
SS1 -.703 -.076
SS2 -.444 -.494
SS3 -.427 -.499
EDUC -.845 -.002
YRSEMP 1.312 1.465
AGE -.273 -.651
PREKNLDGE .214 -1.002
JOBTYPE 1.223 .569
ORGTYPE -3.255 12.196



One hundred and seventeen individuals participated fully in the research study;

that is, they completed both pre and post surveys. These individuals were considered the

treatment group. The mean age of the 117 research participants in the treatment group

was nearly forty-five years and the mean number of years working for their present

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employer was 6.29. Approximately 77% had earned a minimum of a bachelor’s degree;

89.7% were employed by a nonprofit organization; and 56.6% occupied

executive/program management positions.

Sixty-one individuals elected to participate fully in the project and completed both

parts of the survey without attending a training. These sixty-one research participants in

the control group had a mean age of nearly forty-six years and a mean number of years

working for their present employer of 6.93. Approximately 80.3% had earned a

minimum of a bachelor’s degree; 73.8% were employed by a nonprofit organization; and

68.9% occupied executive/program management positions.

Detailed descriptive statistics are provided in Appendices B and C for the

treatment and control groups respectively. An independent samples T-test revealed that

there were no significant differences in age, years employed and education between the

treatment and control groups (p<.05).

Factor Analysis

The 178 cases were used to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis. Although

over 300 cases would have provided more statistical power, studies with sample size

similar to the present study are regularly used in the social sciences and provide adequate

power (Garson, n.d.).

The analysis demonstrated that scale items load on the same factor. Principal

components analysis with a varimax rotation was used to assess the initial factorability of

the remaining twenty-six scale items. Six factors had eigenvalues in excess of one and

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OU1


Frequency Percent Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid 2.0 11 18.6 18.6 18.6

3.0 6 10.2 10.2 28.8

4.0 31 52.5 52.5 81.4

5.0 11 18.6 18.6 100.0

Total 59 100.0 100.0





OU2


Frequency Percent Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid 2.0 12 20.3 20.3 20.3

3.0 8 13.6 13.6 33.9

4.0 31 52.5 52.5 86.4

5.0 8 13.6 13.6 100.0

Total 59 100.0 100.0





OU3


Frequency Percent Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid 1.0 1 1.7 1.7 1.7

2.0 14 23.7 23.7 25.4

3.0 13 22.0 22.0 47.5

4.0 31 52.5 52.5 100.0

Total 59 100.0 100.0

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SS1


Frequency Percent Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid 1.0 2 3.4 3.4 3.4

2.0 16 27.1 27.1 30.5

3.0 10 16.9 16.9 47.5

4.0 24 40.7 40.7 88.1

5.0 7 11.9 11.9 100.0

Total 59 100.0 100.0



SS2


Frequency Percent Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid 1.0 7 11.9 11.9 11.9

2.0 16 27.1 27.1 39.0

3.0 12 20.3 20.3 59.3

4.0 18 30.5 30.5 89.8

5.0 6 10.2 10.2 100.0

Total 59 100.0 100.0



SS3


Frequency Percent Valid Percent

Cumulative

Percent

Valid 1.0 7 11.9 11.9 11.9

2.0 16 27.1 27.1 39.0

3.0 12 20.3 20.3 59.3

4.0 17 28.8 28.8 88.1

5.0 7 11.9 11.9 100.0

Total 59 100.0 100.0

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