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TitleThe Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management: Understanding the Supply Chain
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LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages721
Table of Contents
                            Contents
List of figures
List of tables
Preface
Abbreviations
Part 1 Concepts of logistics and distribution
	01 Introduction to logistics and distribution
		Introduction
		Scope and definition
		Historical perspective
		Importance of logistics and distribution
		Logistics and supply chain structure
		Summary
	02 Integrated logistics and the supply chain
		Introduction
		The total logistics concept
		Planning for logistics
		The financial impact of logistics
		Globalization and integration
		Integrated systems
		Competitive advantage through logistics
		Logistics and supply chain management
		Summary
	03 Customer service and logistics
		Introduction
		The importance of customer service
		The components of customer service
		Two conceptual models of service quality
		Developing a customer service policy
		Levels of customer service
		Measuring customer service
		The customer service explosion
		Summary
	04 Channels of distribution
		Introduction
		Physical distribution channel types and structures
		Channel selection
		Outsourcing channels
		Summary
	05 Key issues and challenges for logistics and the supply chain
		Introduction
		The external environment
		Manufacturing and supply
		Logistics and distribution
		Retailing
		The consumer
		Summary
Part 2 Planning for logistics
	06 Planning framework for logistics
		Introduction
		Pressures for change
		Strategic planning overview
		Logistics design strategy
		Product characteristics
		The product life cycle
		Packaging
		Unit loads
		Summary
	07 Logistics processes
		Introduction
		The importance of logistics processes
		Logistics process types and categories
		Approach
		Tools and techniques
		Summary
	08 Supply chain segmentation
		Introduction
		Product segmentation
		Demand and supply segmentation
		Marketing segmentation
		Combined segmentation frameworks
		Implementation
		Summary
	09 Logistics network planning
		Introduction
		The role of distribution centres and warehouses
		Cost relationships
		A planned approach or methodology
		Initial analysis and option definition
		Logistics modelling: logistics options analysis
		Evaluate results: matching logistics strategy to business strategy
		Practical considerations for site search
		Summary
	10 Logistics management and organization
		Introduction
		Relationships with other corporate functions
		Logistics organizational structures
		Organizational integration
		The role of the logistics or distribution manager
		Payment schemes
		The selection of temporary staff and assets
		Summary
	11 Multichannel fulfilment
		Introduction
		Issues
		Food retailing
		Non-food retailing
		Summary
	12 Manufacturing logistics
		Introduction
		Typology of operations
		Just-in-time
		Manufacturing resource planning (MRPII)
		Material requirements planning (MRP)
		The MRP system
		Flexible fulfilment (postponement)
		The effects on distribution activities
		Future developments
		Summary
Part 3 Procurement and inventory decisions
	13 Basic inventory planning and management
		Introduction
		The need to hold stocks
		Types of stockholding/inventory
		Stockholding policy implications for other logistics functions
		Inventory costs
		Reasons for rising inventory costs
		Inventory replenishment systems
		The reorder point and safety stock
		The bullwhip effect
		The economic order quantity
		Demand forecasting
		Summary
	14 Inventory and the supply chain
		Introduction
		Problems with traditional approaches to inventory planning
		Different inventory requirements and the ‘decoupling point’
		The lead-time gap
		Inventory and time
		Analysing time and inventory
		Inventory planning for manufacturing
		Inventory planning for retailing
		Summary
	15 Procurement and supply
		Introduction
		The procurement cycle
		The scope of procurement
		Setting the procurement objectives
		Managing the suppliers
		Expediting
		Procurement performance measures
		Collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment
		Factory gate pricing
		E-procurement
		Corruption
		Summary
Part 4 Warehousing and storage
	16 Principles of warehousing
		Introduction
		The role of warehouses
		Strategic issues affecting warehousing
		Warehouse operations
		Costs
		Packaging and unit loads
		Summary
	17 Storage and handling systems (palletized)
		Introduction
		Pallet movement
		Pallet stacking
		Palletized storage
		Palletized storage – comparison of systems
		Summary
	18 Storage and handling systems (non-palletized)
		Introduction
		Small item storage systems
		Truck attachments
		Long loads
		Cranes
		Conveyors
		Automated guided vehicles
		Hanging garment systems
		Summary
	19 Order picking and packing
		Introduction
		Order picking concepts
		Order picking equipment
		Sortation
		Picking area layout
		Slotting
		Pick routes
		Information in order picking
		E-fulfilment
		Picking productivity
		Replenishment
		Packing
		Summary
	20 Receiving and dispatch
		Introduction
		Receiving processes
		Dispatch processes
		Cross-docking
		Returned goods
		Receiving and dispatch equipment
		Layouts
		Summary
	21 Warehouse design
		Introduction
		Design procedure
		Summary
	22 Warehouse management and information
		Introduction
		Operational management
		Performance monitoring
		Information technology
		Data capture and transmission
		Radio data communication
		Truck management
		Summary
Part 5 Freight transport
	23 International logistics: modal choice
		Introduction
		Relative importance of the main modes 
of freight transport
		Method of selection
		Operational factors
		Transport mode characteristics
		Consignment factors
		Cost and service requirements
		Aspects of international trade
		Summary
	24 Maritime transport
		Introduction
		Structure of the industry
		Common shipping terms
		Surcharges
		Documentation
		Vessel classification
		Common ship types and their cargoes
		Ports and cargo handling
		Other factors
		Summary
	25 Air transport
		Introduction
		Structure of the industry
		Air cargo handling
		Types of air freighter
		Documentation
		Air hubs and spokes
		Air freight pricing
		Air cargo security
		Summary
	26 Rail and intermodal transport
		Introduction
		Intermodal equipment
		Intermodal vehicles
		Intermodal infrastructure
		Mode shift grant schemes
		Rail transport
		Summary
	27 Road freight transport: vehicle selection
		Introduction
		Main vehicle types
		Types of operation
		Load types and characteristics
		Main types of vehicle body
		The wider implications of vehicle selection
		Vehicle acquisition
		Summary
	28 Road freight transport: vehicle costing
		Introduction
		Reasons for road freight transport vehicle costing
		Key aspects of road transport costing
		Vehicle standing costs
		Vehicle running costs
		Overhead costs
		Costing the total transport operation
		Whole life costing
		Vehicle cost comparisons
		Zero-based budgets
		Summary
	29 Road freight transport: planning and resourcing
		Introduction
		Need for planning
		Fleet management
		Main types of road freight transport
		Transport resources: requirements and optimization
		Vehicle routeing and scheduling issues
		Manual methods of vehicle routeing and scheduling
		Computer routeing and scheduling
		Other road-freight transport information systems applications
		Summary
Part 6 Operational management
	30 Cost and performance monitoring
		Introduction
		Why monitor?
		Different approaches to cost and performance monitoring
		What to measure against?
		A logistics operational planning and control system
		Good practice
		Influencing factors
		Detailed metrics and KPIs
		The presentation of metrics
		Summary
	31 Benchmarking
		Introduction
		Why should an organization engage in benchmarking?
		How to conduct a benchmarking exercise
		Formal benchmarking systems
		Benchmarking distribution operations
		Summary
	32 Information and communication technology in the supply chain
		Introduction
		Basic communication
		Supply chain planning
		Warehousing
		Inventory
		Transport
		Other applications
		Trading using the internet – e-commerce
		Summary
	33 Outsourcing: services and decision criteria
		Introduction
		Outsourcing operations
		Different service types
		Value added services
		Drivers and drawbacks of outsourcing
		What are the critical factors of choice?
		Summary
	34 Outsourcing: the selection process
		Introduction
		Approach
		Detailed steps
		Summary
	35 Outsourcing management
		Introduction
		The need for management
		Managing the relationship
		Implementation planning
		Monitoring an outsourced logistics operation
		Summary
	36 Security and safety in distribution
		Introduction
		International security measures
		Strategic security measures
		Tactical security measures
		Safety in the distribution centre and warehouse
		Summary
	37 Logistics and the environment
		Introduction
		The European Union and environmental legislation
		Logistics and environmental best practice
		Alternative fuels
		Summary
	38 Humanitarian logistics
		Introduction
		Key differences
		Performance measurement
		Key terms
		Pre-positioning of resources
		Assessment and planning
		The cluster approach
		Distribution
		Summary
		Further reading
	References
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

The handbook of
Logistics &
Distribution
ManageMent

5th EDItION

AlAN RushtON, PhIl CROuChER,
PEtER BAkER

4th EDItION

EDItED by
AlAN RushtON, PhIl CROuChER,

PEtER bAkER

Logistics
Distribution
MAnAgEMEnt

THE HANDBOOK OF
&

i

Page 360

receiving and Dispatch 329

returned goods

Goods may, of course, be returned to a warehouse for a variety of reasons such as:

• Unwanted goods (eg clothing items that do not fit).
• Incorrect goods originally dispatched (eg owing to an order picking error).
• Damaged goods (eg owing to poor packing).
• Recalled goods (eg where the manufacturer has found a fault and recalls goods back

from customers).
• End of life goods (eg electrical and electronic items that require recovery and recycling

under the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive).
• Unit loads (eg pallets and roll cages that need repair, and plastic trays that require

washing before reuse).
• Packaging (eg returned by stores).

In some industries, for example fashion sales via the internet or home catalogue, the proportion
of goods being returned to the warehouse may be very high (eg 20–30 per cent or even more).
The handling of returns must therefore be carried out effectively, with processes in place for
deciding whether, for example, to return goods to original suppliers, repair or refurbish the
goods, return to stock, sell through another channel or outlet store, sell to a merchant, pass to
a charity, recycle or send to landfill. It is important that these decisions are taken quickly so
that returned goods do not build up and take a lot of space in the warehouse. In addition, there
may be considerable cash tied up in returned goods if they are not handled quickly. Some
companies establish specific zones in warehouses to handle returned goods while others have
set up specialist warehouses that act as returned goods centres.

receiving and dispatch equipment

The equipment types required for unloading and loading tend to be similar in nature for both
receiving and dispatch, and these are therefore described together.

Common types of handling equipment include:

• Boom conveyors. Goods are frequently shipped in loose cartons in ISO containers to
save on space in the container, to comply with wood regulations affecting pallets, and
to save the cost of pallets that will not be returned. Similarly, packets are frequently
transported loose to parcel carriers, as they will be individually sorted to destination on
arrival at the parcel hub warehouse. In these instances, a boom conveyor may be used
to extend into the vehicle or container. The warehouse staff then just need to lift the
goods on to, or off, the conveyor, which transports the goods from, or to, the appropriate
area of the warehouse.

Page 361

330 Warehousing and storage

• Pallet trucks. Where loading and unloading takes place from the rear of the vehicle,
then it is normal for a pallet truck (either hand or powered) to be used.

• Fork-lift trucks. For side-unloading (eg of curtain-sided vehicles), a counterbalanced
fork-lift truck is normally used. These may be fitted with side-shifts so that the pallet
can be accurately positioned on the vehicle. Another form of attachment that is often
used is one that enables two pallets (side by side) to be lifted at a time. Fork-lift trucks
with telescopic booms (see Chapter 17) are also sometimes used so that vehicles can
be loaded from just one side, thus saving on warehouse yard space. Conventional
counterbalanced fork-lift trucks may also be used for end-unloading and -loading,
particularly if pallets are stacked two high on a vehicle. In this case, trucks with a
maximum free lift are required, so that the truck mast does not rise while inside
the vehicle. Another common use is for slip-sheets to be used to separate unit loads
in a container, and special attachments can be fitted to unload and load these.

Source: Joloda

Figure 20.2 Pallets on a conveyor system, ready for automated loading/unloading

Page 720

index 689

and the cluster approach 668–69, 669
Convention of Transboundary Impacts of

Industrial Accidents 641
Doha Amendment (2012) 644
EDIFACT: Electronic Data Interchange for

Administration, Commerce & Transport
549

Humanitarian Response Depots (UNHRD) 666
Centre of Excellence for Training in Logistics

666
Logistics Cluster Logistics Operations Guide

(LOG) 667
World Food Programme (WFP) 662

United States (US) see also legislation (US)
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection:

www.cbp.gov 625
cargo security measures 625
Container Security Initiative (CSI) 624, 625–26
Council of Supply Chain Management

Professionals: Annual State of Logistics
Report (2012) 10–11

Customs–Trade Partnership against Terrorism
(C–TPAT) 416, 624, 625

Free and Secure Trade (FAST) 624, 625, 626
and liner conferences exempt from anti-

competition laws 390
rail freight in 368
reduction in logistics costs as percentage of GDP

(2007–2009) 11
Secure Freight Initiative (SFI) 626
shipping surcharges 394
transport costs 11

Van Den Burg, G 417
vehicle acquisition methods: purchase; leasing;

rental agreements 453–54
vehicles see intermodal vehicles; road freight

transport and truck(s)
heavy goods (HGV) 333, 435
large goods (LGV) 435, 636

vendor-managed inventory (VMI) 74, 82, 228,
230, 236, 237–38, 246

Walker, S 77
warehouse design procedure, steps for 336–52

calculate capital and operating costs 350
calculate equipment quantities 349–50
calculate staffing levels 350

define business requirements and design
constraints 337–38

define and obtain data 338–40
define operational principles 342–43, 343
draw up high-level procedures and information

system requirements 347
evaluate design against business requirements

and design constraints 351
evaluate design flexibility 348, 349
evaluate equipment types 343–45, 344
finalize preferred design 351–52
formulate a planning base 340–41, 34, 342
prepare internal and external layouts 345–47

warehouse management (and) 353–63
data capture and transmission 360–62 see also

subject entry
information technology and WMS 358–60,

358, 359
legal requirements/local regulations 355
operational 353, 355, 354
performance monitoring 355–58 see also

subject entry
radio data communication 362
risk assessment 355
truck management 363

warehouse management system(s) (WMS)
304–05, 317, 323, 358–60, 359, 553

warehouses/warehousing (and) 255–65, 563–64,
571–72

break bulk 564
classification of 255–56
costs 263
cross-dock(ing) 262, 262, 564, 572
excess storage 564
holding inventory 256–58
international distribution operations 572
operations 259–62, 260, 261, 262, 571–72
and packaging/unit loads 263–65
roles of 257–58
storage 563
strategic issues affecting 258–59
trans-shipment 564

Warsaw Convention (1929) 405, 414
Wikipedia: definition of logistics 5
Womack, P J 72
World Food Programme (WFP) 662, 666

Zairi, M 532

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