Download The Eyeopener - February 10, 2010 - Love & Sex issue PDF

TitleThe Eyeopener - February 10, 2010 - Love & Sex issue
File Size24.3 MB
Total Pages19
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Warning: nudity, explicit material may offend

Warning: nudity, explicit material may offend

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Wednesday, February 10, 20102 • The Eyeopener AD

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Page 9

Wednesday, February 10, 2010 The Eyeopener • 9 SCIENCE OF SEX

Biography of red
BY AMANDA CUPIDO

Arts And Life editor

Red has a split personality. She may

strut around town on stilettos or be

the one chosen to write a love letter. If

caught on a bad day, she’ll show up on

an angry face. She’s known for catching

the eye and stopping people in their

tracks.

The colour red is scientifically prov-

en to stand out more than any other

colour. Alice Chu, a Ryerson fashion

professor and author of Design and

Colour, says, “We look at red as a very

noticeable and very strong colour.” Red

wants to be in the spotlight.

Chu’s book explains how red draws

the attention of the human eye because

the, “rate of energy which is expressed

physically through wavelengths.”

Red has long wavelengths with a

low frequency of vibration. The retina

distinguishes colours based on these

wavelengths. This makes red at the top

of the natural order of colours, followed

by orange and then yellow.

Red likes to be first. According to Pig-

ments Through the Ages, a web exhibit,

red is the first colour humans can see.

It also says, “brain-injured persons suf-

fering from temporary colour-blind-

ness start to perceive red before they

are able to discern any other colours.”

Historically, red was put on a ped-

estal, just the way she wanted it. In the

Neolithic era, warriors painted axes and

spears with red in order to repel evil in-

fluence. Cave painters from that time

also believed she had magic powers.

But red wanted to show people her

darker side. The ancient Greeks associ-

ated her with the gods of war, Phoebus

and Ares. In turn, she became linked to

blood and fire.

In ancient Egypt red was also the

colour which represented the destruc-

tive god, Seth. She began to develop a

negative connotation and was related

to all that was evil and wrong. Egyptian

scribes used her when writing nasty

words.

The schizophrenia begins.

Red moved away from her evil side

at cultural events. India, Korea and

China used red for the colour of wed-

ding gowns. It is still prevalent to this

day. Chu says that in this case, red rep-

resents joy and good luck.

Red also attached herself to garlands

and scarves at Roman weddings where

she represented love and fertility.

With every relationship, there is love

but there is also sex. Red soon became

a colour of sexuality and was being la-

belled for her promiscuity. Because of

this, she is still seen as seductive.

In 2005 Rabbi Eliyahu Abergil, from

Israel, banned women from wearing

red since it was the colour of prosti-

tutes.

Red pushes her way into the media

and isn’t afraid to come across as pro-

miscuous. In Gary Marshall’s Pretty

Woman (1990), Julia Roberts portrays a

prostitute, where she is depicted wear-

ing red lipstick and a red coat.

Similarly, Kim Cattrall, who played

Samantha in the television series Sex

and the City, was often wearing red

attire to accompany her promiscuous

character.

Paula Brancati, the actress who is

Jane on Degrassi: The Next Generation,

notices how the colour red is is used in

television.

“When red is chosen it’s very deliber-

ate,” says Brancati. “When I’ve played

promiscuous characters, it’s always the

colour of choice.” She explains that cer-

tain costumes allow for specific charac-

teristics to be portrayed and how red ex-

udes “power and confidence.”

Chu explains how red is not only the

colour of confidence, but hierarchy. She

references the uniform of the RCMP and

England’s soldiers. “It’s used to show roy-

alty, power and authority.”
With her booming confidence, red

calls the attention of anyone and every-

one. She is used by companies to draw in

potential consumers. Coca-Cola, Canada

Post and the TTC like to use her for what

she does best. She is able to get all eyes to

look at her, no matter who is else around.

Red will make her escape when it gets

to be too much. According to Chu, it is

proven that the first crayon out of a child’s

collection to go missing is most likely the

red one. “That means it is really attractive

and they like to use it,” she says.

Design and Colour explains that chil-

dren learn certain responses to colours

as they are growing up and how colour

can be related to tastes, sounds, tempera-

tures, textures or scents. She writes, “At

times, our feelings for a particular colour

may exist only at an unconscious level.”

Red isn’t just about colour, she’s about

context. She’s hot, but loving. She’s capti-

vating, but angry. She’s lucky. She’s pro-

miscuous. She’s evil. And it’s certain that

she’ll flush your cheeks in every moment

of embarrassment and ecstasy.

Orgasm: The four stages of pleasure



1. Excitement phase

This phase has an increase in heart
rate, breathing rate and blood
pressure. The nipples usually get
hard at this point. No pun intended.
The body also prepares for sexual
intercourse.

2. Plateau phase

In the second phase, the body
continues to increase heart rate
and circulation. Muscle tension
also is noticeable. Women will find
the tissues of the outer third of the
vagina will swell. Men pre-ejaculate.

3. Orgasm

This is the conclusion of the plateau
phase and is known for muscle
contractions in the lower pelvic
muscles and involuntary actions.
This includes all of that screaming
and moaning.

4. Resolution phase

The muscles relax, the blood
pressure drops and the body calms
down. The time it takes to fully relax
differs from person to person. For
some, it can take as long as a full 24
hours.

Red isn’t just about colour,
she’s about context. She’s
hot, but loving. She’s
captivating, but angry.

Page 10

Wednesday, February 10, 201010 • The Eyeopener lovE & SEx SurvEy The Eyeopener • 11Wednesday, February 10, 2010 lovE & SEx SurvEy

“Love is like the inside of a moist, warm brownie.”
The Eyeopener’s annual Love and Sex Survey reveals Ryerson’s inner kink

The “Viennese Oyster” is a sex position that involves the
woman (or man) on their back with their ankles up by their
ears while the partner on top holds the calves for stability
and thrusts. To the average person this may sound tricky,
but one Ryerson student listed it as their favourite position
in this year’s love and sex survey.

Each year the Eyeopener sends out interns to gather Ry-
erson’s deepest secrets and dirtiest desires. After collect-
ing 181 surveys from across campus and spending 10 hours
tabulating the data, we discovered students get creative
when it comes to pleasing each other.

Twenty-eight per cent get rough with their partners by bit-
ing and scratching, while 19 per cent get off on dominance
or submission. On the extreme end, nine per cent liked fan-
tasy rape, and three per cent enjoyed erotic asphyxiation.

Now things get weird. Eight per cent of students polled are
turned on by vampirism. Eleven per cent enjoy exhibitionism
— and they’re doing the dirty all over campus, from oral sex
in the Ram to intercourse in the cafeterias. Bathrooms and
stairwells are easy targets, but you might want to check the
seat before your next lecture: one of the students polled “be-
gan to masturbate [in class] but stopped before too intense.”

We know you are lying when only 58 per cent admit to mas-
turbating, but the 68 per cent of you who are in love seem
sincere. Love, you said, feels “like hundreds of bunnies hug-
ging you,” and “like a long wonderful session of laughing.”

And the sex is better when you’re in love. “The fucks are
harder — more intentional,” you said. Love “makes it feel
more personal (and I can fart and it’s okay).”

Well, keep farting, and keep making love.


68% 25% 8%23% 25%
Per cent that
are in love

Per cent in long-term
relationships

Per cent that
are virgins

Per cent turned
on by bondage

Per cent turned on
by role playing

Draw your favourite
sex position

By REBEcca BuRTon anD GianLuca inGLESi

Page 18

intimacy The Eyeopener • 19Wednesday, February 10, 2010

G
reg never had that sense of security.

“I just always had this feeling of

doubt, like I could get dropped off at

the edge of a cliff at any second.”

Both in their third year at Ryerson, they met

in first-year residence, but had known of each

other by a friend-of-a-friend connection.

They quickly grew close, and Sarah found her-

self going in and out of “massive crushes” on her

new best friend. By summer they were dating.

Right away, Sarah’s friends warned Greg: don’t

get too comfortable, she doesn’t like being tied

down.

The first break-up lasted 15 minutes. She sur-

prised him with a ticket to see indie rock band

Bruce Peninsula, and just before the show they

had a fight, and arrived at the venue pissed off.

Sarah looked Greg straight in the eyes and

yelled, “we should just break up.”

“What?” He couldn’t hear over the music.

“WE SHOULD JUST BREAK UP!”

Sarah felt liberated. Greg was crushed. They

found a quieter spot and talked it out. Neither of

them really wanted to break up, she just wanted

some space.

That break-up, albeit short, set a precedent

for the rest of the relationship. The breaking up

and making-up continued.

The constant ups and downs made Greg feel

like he was never 100 per cent into the relation-

ship, and the disconnect showed itself when it

came to sex.

“As soon as we were actually intimate and re-

ally close, whenever we felt connected as people,

the sex was great,” says Sarah. “But as soon as we

weren’t, then it was bad.”

B
eing physically close, touching one an-

other, having sex — it can sound like inti-

macy, but James Cunningham says this is

a misuse of the word.

“If we have sexual contact but there is no emo-

tional connection made at all, then we might as

well be masturbating.” Cunningham has been

teaching PHL 606, Philosophy of Love and Sex at

Ryerson for nine years.

“We confuse physical contact with physical in-

timacy. I can imagine circumstances where sexual

contact makes no connection, and we’ll still call

that intimacy. And I think that’s wrong.”

To find that connection, couples need to work

on their intimacy when they’re not between the

sheets. And it’s all about communication — but a

very particular kind of communication.

Jansen says people assume their partners know

why and how much they’re loved, but they still

need to hear it. Couples need to actively commu-

nicate their appreciation of one another.

“It’s not about being really clear when some-

body pisses you off or being honest about every-

thing, although those are really important too,”

says Jansen. “It’s about the things we all like to hear

and we think the other person already knows.”

Even “I love you” can lose meaning when said

out of habit, so it’s important to be more specific.

Jansen runs intimacy workshops out of Good

For Her, and she gets couples to finish sentences

like “I love it when you...” and “It really gets me hot

when you...”

She uses physical intimacy exercises to bring

couples together. In one, someone lays down and

tells their partner exactly how to touch them. The

giver’s only job is to follow instructions with no as-

sumptions, no interpretations. As the directions

continue they should always offer a positive and a

new suggestion: “I like where you’re touching me,

but do it more softly.” Keep it up for 20 to 30 min-

utes, then switch roles. Jansen says this teaches

couples how to communicate what they want.

Sarah and Greg tried this out, and in Sarah’s

words, “it was epic.”

I
t was late, and they were both tired and head-

ing to bed. Sarah suggested they try out the

exercise, just for 10 minutes. Then it turned

into 15. Then it turned into an hour. Then it turned

into sex. Twice.

“We had sex once and were like ‘woah that was

so amazing, we loved it,’” says Sarah. “We felt re-

ally intimate and close.”

They both felt more in the moment. “There

wasn’t pressure. I just took time to feel everything

and enjoy and savour,” says Sarah. “It made me

feel everything so much more intensely.”

Sarah even had an orgasm. Before she would

get too wrapped up in how Greg felt and didn’t

concentrate on her own pleasure. But with the

exercise she focused on every touch. And where

before she would wait for Greg to do something

to her — to turn her on, to make that first move

— this time she took a more active role.

“I realized that it was my responsibility to get

myself into the mood too.”

A
recent study in The Canadian Journal of

Human Sexuality explored what made

for “great sex.” The researchers found

eight key things: “being present, connection,

deep sexual and erotic intimacy, extraordinary

communication, interpersonal risk-taking and

exploration, authenticity, vulnerability and tran-

scendence.” In a word: intimacy.

Note that technical expertise didn’t make the

list. Physical sensation and orgasming were only

minor components and study participants said

they weren’t even required for a good romp.

Satisfying sex doesn’t come from orgasming

every time, and it can’t be found by trying to

spice things up with kink.

“That’s how people think they’re going to find

intimacy,” says Jansen. She says kinky relation-

ships can have intimacy, but it’s because that

bond was formed first. Otherwise it’s just roller

coaster — it’s a rush, but there’s no substance.

“It’s fun and it’s in the moment. It’s wild. It’s

exciting. And then when you’re done, it’s done,”

she says. “If you’re looking for something a little

more sustainable and something a little deeper

that can incorporate an endorphin rush, then

what you’re looking for is intimacy.”

*names have been changed

As soon as we were actually intimate and really close, whenever we felt
connected as people, the sex was great.

— Sarah, third-year Ryerson student

For more info contact: Lise de Montbrun,
Vice-President of Student Life & Events, [email protected]

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Page 19

Wednesday, February 10, 201020 • The Eyeopener Fun

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