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TitleThe Early Childhood Education Intervention Treatment Planner (Practice Planners)
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.1 MB
Total Pages237
Table of Contents
                            The Early Childhood Education Intervention Treatment Planner
	CONTENTS
	PRACTICE PLANNERS SERIES PREFACE
	ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
	INTRODUCTION
		PLANNER FOCUS
		HISTORY AND BACKGROUND
		TREATMENT PLAN UTILITY
		HOW TO DEVELOP A TREATMENT PLAN
		HOW TO USE THIS PLANNER
		A FINAL NOTE
	AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	ARTICULATION/VOICE CONCERNS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	ATTACHMENT CONCERNS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	ATTENTION /FOCUS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	AUTISM
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	DEPRESSION
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	EATING CONCERNS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	ELIMINATION CONCERNS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE DELAY
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	GENERALIZED ANXIETY
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	HEARING DEFICITS/DEAFNESS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	MEDICALLY FRAGILE
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	MILD COGNITIVE DELAYS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	MODERATE/SEVERE COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	OPPOSITIONAL BEHAVIOR
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE DELAY
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	SCHOOL ENTRY READINESS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	SENSORY INTEGRATION NEEDS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	SEPARATION ANXIETY
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	SHYNESS/SOCIAL PHOBIA
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	SLEEP ISSUES
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	SOCIAL SKILLS DELAY
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	VISION DEFICITS/BLINDNESS
		BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS
		LONG-TERM GOALS
		SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES
		THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS
	APPENDIX A: PARENT SELF-HELP BIBLIOGRAPHY
		Aggressive Behavior
		Articulation/Voice Concerns
		Attachment Concerns
		Attention/Focus
		Autism
		Depression
		Eating Concerns
		Elimination Concerns
		Expressive Language Delay
		Generalized Anxiety
		Hearing Deficits/Deafness
		Medically Fragile
		Mild Cognitive Delays
		Moderate/Severe Cognitive Impairment
		Oppositional Behavior
		Physical Impairment
		Receptive Language Delay
		School Entry Readiness
		Sensory Integration Needs
		Separation Anxiety
		Shyness/Social Phobia
		Sleep Issues
		Social Skills Delay
		Vision Defiits/Blindness
	APPENDIX B: PROFESSIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
		Aggressive Behavior
		Articulation/Voice Concerns
		Attachment Concerns
		Attention/Focus
		Autism
		Depression
		Eating Concerns
		Elimination Concerns
		Expressive Language Delay
		Generalized Anxiety
		Hearing Deficits/Deafness
		Medically Fragile
		Mild Cognitive Delays
		Moderate/Severe Cognitive Impairment
		Oppositional Behavior
		Physical Impairment
		School Entry Readiness
		Sensory Integration Needs
		Separation Anxiety
		Shyness/Social Phobia
		Sleep Issues
		Social Skills Delay
		Vision Deficits/Blindness
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Arthur E. Jongsma, Jr., Series Editor

The Early Childhood
Education Intervention

Treatment Planner

Julie A. Winkelstern

Arthur E. Jongsma, Jr.

JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC.

PracticePlanners®


File Attachment
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Page 118

98

MEDICALLY FRAGILE

BEHAVIORAL DEFINITIONS

1. Presents with a chronic illness or condition that continuously compro-
mises health or results in acute episodes (e.g., pediatric asthma, type one
diabetes, sickle cell anemia, cancer, seizure disorders, HIV / AIDS, juvenile
arthritis, cystic fi brosis).

2. Demonstrates compromised cognitive, physical, and / or affective func-
tioning.

3. Interruptions in school or daycare attendance occur as a result of hospi-
talizations or long- term convalescence at home.

4. Has essential medical needs that require environmental changes in the
classroom setting.

5. Demonstrates delays with developmental tasks below learning potential
due to weakened tolerance to daily activities.

__.



__.



__.



LONG- TERM GOALS

1. Maintain the greatest possible degree of normalcy in the classroom setting.
2. Function commensurate with learning potential in relation to general de-

velopmental progress.
3. Parents assist staff in understanding the medical condition of their child,

providing information and advocating for health accommodations in the
classroom setting.

Page 119

MEDICALLY FRAGILE 99

4. Parents work closely with staff to create a quality and safe experience for
their child.

__.



__.



__.



SHORT-TERM THERAPEUTIC
OBJECTIVES INTERVENTIONS

1. Parents provide information to
classroom staff regarding the
child’s medical condition. (1)

1. Arrange for a consultation with
the family to discuss salient issues
of the child’s health and medical
condition.

2. Parents give permission for
staff to have access to the
child’s medical records and
treating personnel. (2)

2. Obtain a release of informa-
tion from parents for medical
personnel to provide pertinent
health / medical information re-
garding the child.

3. Parents meet with classroom
personnel to assist with specifi c
health- related plans for the
child, including the administra-
tion of medications. (3, 4, 5)

3. Organize pertinent staff mem-
bers, including a school or public
health nurse, to review health
issues of the child as they relate to
the classroom setting.

4. Facilitate a meeting involving the
school or public health nurse,
a supervisor or teacher from
the school, the child’s parents,
and medical personnel to create
protocols that are needed to meet
the daily health care issues of the
child.

5. Train the staff responsible for the
child in specifi c techniques re-
quired for his / her care (e.g., use of
inhaler, testing of blood, giving of
insulin, process for feeding tube)
prior to the child beginning in

Page 236

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Shyness / Social Phobia

Carducci, B. J. (1999). Shyness: A Bold New Approach. New York: HarperCollins.
Carducci, B. J. (2003). The Shyness Breakthrough. New York: Rodale.
Crozier, W. R. (2000). Shyness: Development, Consolidation and Change. New

York: Routledge.
Crozier, W. R. (2001). Understanding Shyness: Psychological Perspectives. New

York: Palgrave.
Ollendick, T. H., and Cerny, J. A. (1981). Clinical Behavior Therapy with Children.

New York: Plenum.
Zimbardo, P. G., and Radl, S. L. (1999).The Shy Child: Overcoming and Preventing

Shyness from Infancy to Adulthood. New York: McGraw Hill.

Sleep Issues

Firman, P. C., Hoff, K. E., Schnoes, C., Freeman, K. A., Woods, D. W., and
Blum, N. (1999). The Bedtime Pass: An Approach to Bedtime Crying and
Leaving the Room. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, 153,
1027–1029.

Gimpel, G. A., and Holland, M. L. (2003). Emotional and Behavioral Problems of
Young Children. New York: Guilford.

Maldonado- Duran, J. M. (Ed.). (2002). Infant and Toddler Mental Health.
Washington, DC: American Psychiatric.

Stores, G., and Wiggs, L. (2001). Sleep Disturbance in Children and Adolescents
with Disorders of Development: Its Signifi cance and Management. London:
Mac Keith.

Social Skills Delay

Barkley, R. A. (1997). Defi ant Children, Second Edition: A Clinician’s Manual for
Assessment and Parent Training. New York: Guilford.

Charney, R. S., and Wood, C. (1981). The Responsible Classroom Approach to
Instruction. Greenfi eld, MA: Northeast Foundation for Children.

Delton, J. (1988). Two Good Friends. New York: Knopf Books for Young Readers.
Elliott, S. N., McKevitt, B. C., and DePerna, J. C. (2002). Preschool Social

Skills Training. In A. Thomas and J. Grimes (Eds.), Best Practices in School
Psychology IV (pp. 1041– 1056). Bethesda, Maryland: National Association of
School Psychologists.

Fay, J., and Fay, C. (2002). Love and Logic Magic for Early Childhood: Practical
Parentng from Birth to Six Years. Golden, CO: Love and Logic.

Page 237

PROFESSIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY 217

Gresham, F. M., and Elliott, S. N. (1990). The Social Skills Rating System. Circle
Pines, MN: American Guidance Services.

Hazen, N., Black, B., and Fleming- Johnson, F. (1984). Social Acceptance:
Strategies Children Use and How Teachers Can Help Children Learn Them.
Young Children, 39, 23– 26.

LaRoque, M., Brown, S., and Johnson, K. (2001). Functional Behavioral
Assessments and Intervention Plans in Early Intervention Settings. Infants
and Young Children, 13, 59– 68.

Matson, J., Fee, V., Coe, D., and Smith, D. (1991). A Social Skills Program for
Developmentally Delayed Preschoolers. Child and Family Behavior Therapy,
20, 227– 242.

Merrell, K. W. (1994). Preschool and Kindergarten Behavior Scales. Austin, TX:
Pro- Ed.

Michigan Department of Education—Offi ce of Special Education and Early
Intervention Services. (2000). Positive Behavior Support for ALL Michigan
Students: Creating Environments That Assure Learning. Charlotte, MI: Eaton
Intermediate School District.

Mueller, F., and Larson, M. (2001). Positive Behavior Support for Young Children:
A Supplement to Positive Behavior Support for ALL Michigan Students:
Creating Environments That Assure Learning. Charlotte, MI: Eaton
Intermediate School District.

Phelan, T. (1995). 1- 2- 3 Magic: Training Your Preschoolers and Preteens to Do
What You Want. Glen Ellyn, IL: Child Management.

Prutzman, P., Burger, M. L., Bodenhamer, G., and Stern, L. (1977). The Friendly
Classroom for a Small Planet: Handbook of the Children’s Creative Response to
Confl ict Program. New York: Quaker Project on Community Confl ict.

Vision Defi cits / Blindness

Pogrund, R. L., Fazzi, D. L., and Lampert, J. S. (1992). Early Focus: Working with
Young Blind and Visually Impaired Children and Their Families. New York:
American Foundation for the Blind.

Sachs, S. Z., Kekelis, L. S., and Gaylord- Ross, R. J. (1992). The Development of
Social Skills by Blind and Visually Impaired Students. New York: American
Foundation for the Blind.

Stratton, J. M., and Wright, S. (1991). On the Way to Literacy: Early Experiences
for Visually Impaired Children. Louisville, KY: American Printing House for
the Blind.

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Guide for Birth–3 Year Olds. Springfi eld, IL: Charles C. Thomas.

Webster, A., and Roe, J. (1998). Children with Visual Impairments: Social
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