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TitleThe Destruction of Black Civilization
TagsBlack History
LanguageEnglish
File Size22.7 MB
Total Pages193
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Document Text Contents
Page 1

"A Foundation and new approach to the history of our race . . . It was
pioneering research into unexplored areas . This book is not only
urgently needed now, but it will be read by future generations ."

-John Hendrick Clarke, President
African Heritage Association

"This book should be the basis for all the so-called Black Studies
programs . This is the basic text, necessary for Afrikan mental development
in the last part of the 20th century ."

- Imamu Amiri Baraka, Chairman
The Congress of African People

"Williams' directness, forcefulness, and the partial warmth of an
insider whose own destiny and that of his people is at stake has strong
impact . . . . The Destruction of Black Civilization is a balanced
appraisal of an ancient and contemporary African history

-The Black World

"From a well documented chapter on Egyptian civilization, Chancellor
Williams moves on through material that deals with the impact of
Judaism and Christianity on the African migrations . . . .His claim that
Islam helped the slavery of Black Africa is untrue because he used white
text rather than accounts of non-whites academia and the truth ."

-Muhammad Speaks

"This book is a contribution to the understanding of Black civilization
and the way of life of African people . For once here is documentation
put forth by a Black scholar . More books of this kind are needed ."

-Wiley Smith III, Associate Director
Institute of African-American
Affairs, Kent State University

. .It is a comprehensive analysis of our past and a most perceptive
and relevant analysis of our present condition as a people .

-Andrew J . Billingsley,
Vice President for Academic

Affairs, Howard University

"Chancellor Williams comes to us at a time when his message, if
interpreted correctly, can help us to understand Why We Lose-
why the Black African man rests firmly on the bottom of Africa and
everywhere else the African and his descendants reside . His book needs
little analysis . It needs to be read . His message is sharp and clear for
everyone to see . . . . He says that the central problem of 30 million Black
Americans in the United States is unity-that we must unite or perish ."

-The Afrocentric World Review

THE DESTRUCTION OF
BLACK CIVILIZATION
GREAT ISSUES OF A RACE

FROM 4500 B .C . TO 2000 A .D .

BY CHANCELLOR WILLIAMS
Third World Press



$16 .95

Page 2

I

I

Y

THE
DESTRUCTION
OF
BLACK
CIVILIZATION
GREAT ISSUES OF A RACE
FROM 4500 B .C . TO 2000 A .D .

by Chancellor Williams
Illustrated by Murry`N . DePillars

WTP
THIRD WORLD PRESS



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Page 96

1 9 0



The Destruction of Black Civilization

them? Certainly nothing coming from the Blacks required any serious
consideration . The mind transplant had been most successful as an
operation on the Blacks .

Having lost the honor of full manhood that comes only from the pride
of racial worth and identity, the black man's mind generally operates
favorably toward his white enemies and negatively toward himself and
his kind .

No one knows this better than the whites . They have, therefore, had a
free and unchallenged hand in reordering the Land of the Blacks as they
saw fit, classifying and naming people, places and things just as they
pleased . The Blacks were nonpersons or nobodies in their own land .
From one end of the continent to the other black youth saw great
monuments and statues of Europeans only, European and Arab names
for African roads, hills, lakes, towns and cities . One youngster, whose
ancestors had migrated from the north centuries ago, stood gazing at a
statue of Cecil Rhodes . "He's in our school hooks too!" he proudly
informed his parents . The smile left as he asked, "But why are our great
men forgotten? We never hear about them ." As none could answer,
there was silence . This particular group belonged to a family that was
2,000 miles from the known "original" home . This refers to the place
that oral tradition declares to be the original home . But we know that
the "place of origin" often given in the oral record means the place
where the group lived for so many generations that previous homesites
during these long drawn-out migrations had been forgotten . What they
had forgotten, however, was less tragic than their ignorance of some of
the well-known facts of their more recent history as a people . The boy
had raised important questions . They could not answer because they
are Blacks of Rhodesia . What little history they knew was white Rhode-
sian history, and this they could learn from Rhodes to Ian Smith . They
did not know that they had been living for generations in the center of
what was once one of the greatest black empires in Africa, nor had they
ever heard of the great African leader of that empire, Emperor Mutota .
As elsewhere, Rhodesian history began with the coming of the whites .
All before that is "unknown pre-history ."

TO THE CAVES, TO THE SWAMPS

We have been studying those people who were actually migrating
from a highly advanced civilization to less advanced regions or regions
not advanced at all, but who continued to rebuild new states until they

The Scattering of the People



191

were destroyed by the European invasions . Since a representative
number of these states appear in the following pages, a final word
should be said about the vast numbers who found only caves and
swamps as places of refuge and, therefore, built no states, but sank
lower and lower in hopelessness, ever-present fears of capture, and a life
that was not life but an animal-like struggle to survive . I referred to
these before, but all too briefly . They are an inseparable part of the
history of the race . Their savage state enables us to measure the distance
from the heights to the level where so many of the race had fallen ; it also
may be the bold recognition on our part that serves as a guidelight on
the road back to greatness . Call them "savages" if that pleases you . But
these were the Blacks in retreat before the slave-hunters . These were
the Blacks who had to choose between enslavement for life, and that of
all of their descendants, and freedom . They did not hesitate . They chose
freedom even though it meant the loss of civilization, a civilization
which they had, in fact, already lost . To be slaves of Arabs, Europeans
or Americans simply meant becoming the economic foundation of their
civilization and the steady destruction of the civilization of the Blacks .

So, all hail to the Black "savages"-those noble ancestors who chose
both freedom and death in preference to white enslavement! Freedom
and death . Once the paths they made in flight could be followed for
days by their bloody footprints in the sand . The windblown sand had
easily covered these up . Later travellers and slave-hunters could
determine the various routes of flight by the skeletons found here and
there, fallen statues left by those who could not make it on . They were
generally disjointed and scattered ; sometimes it was a bony arm pro-
truding from the windswept sands, a leg over there or a skull seeming to
smile "peace at last!" The bones of other thousands who died in flight
were never seen . They lay buried forever under the tons of sand and
rocks that moved over much of the regions .

Masses of Blacks found security in hills that were made inaccessible to
both Arabs and Europeans . Such were Blacks who isolated themselves
in the strongholds of the Nuba Hills . They were never conquered,
throwing back all invading army units that attempted subjugation and
enslavement . Westerners point to their primitive state, to their nude
and half-nude bodies . To the somewhat twisted Western mind, naked-
ness in public is indicative of the savage . The "twisted mind" becomes
evident when the same people do not find it necessary to explain the

Page 97

1 9 2



The Destruction of Black Civilization

universality of white nudist colonies or naked bodies (not to mention
sexual intercouse) on public stages and screens . Reference to the Noba
people, of course, is simple to give still another example of a people who
had to make the grim choice between freedom and slavery, chosing
freedom even when that choice meant isolation and, inevitably, retro-
gression . Blacks who were among the very first weavers and cloth
makers on earth could no longer wear clothes .

These flights before the mighty firepower of the invaders became
more general after 1400 A .D ., even though guns, after 200 years of
development, were still not in widespread use in Africa . Only Europeans
and Arabs were able to secure a limited supply of these "precious" and
certain-to-conquer weapons . The Blacks had nothing of the kind .
Meanwhile, experimentation to improve various types of gunnery and
speed up production was frantically pushed . The successful outcome of
this great venture in firepower was the prelude to the industrial revolu-
tion that was to change not only the material world, but what was left of
the humane nature of man himself .

It is not likely that the people were then generally aware that they
were being slowly hemmed in from all directions . It is possible that
many did "feel" it, without having any exact knowledge of being
encircled, although the danger might be several hundred miles away
where the hostile seas met the friendly land . Other groups of wandering
Blacks headed for dismal swamps, still others dug caves in hillsides .
There were those who wandered aimlessly out into the scorching desert
and died with their babies strapped to their backs and larger children
clutched by their hands . This meant that the bleached skeletons of little
babies and children greeted the eyes as though additional testimony
were needed to show how many of the young were included among
those who could not make it even to barbarism .

All of those who survived in these various groups ended up in areas
where they could do little more than survive . Even if they had not
splintered off into small independent societies, famine and disease
would have reduced their numbers anyway . Therefore, as noted else-
where, there were many firmly united groups that were so large that
migrating as a single unit was impossible . Here the very circumstances of
the case demanded separation, estrangement and isolation from the
mother society, and the eventual development of several new language
groups . The disunity among the Blacks that spread over the whole race
often developed from crisis situations over which they had no control in
the awful struggle to survive .

The Scattering of the People 193

The millions who found security only in places of extreme isolation-
in caves, swamps, around a few precious waterholes in deserts and on
inaccessible hills-none of these people were favored with the chance
even to begin the building of their lost civilization . Far from being
ashamed of them as "savages," this chapter is a salute to them, a salute
with pride that says to them "all honor and all glory!" Unlike the Blacks
we know most about, they could not build great kingdoms and empires .
Many were far removed even from the fringes of an advancing world .
Yet they overrode the unceasing attacks of both death and hell, and
survived . What is more, they held fast the last line of freedom on the
African continent, and they held it against cannon fire to the very end .
Even when colonialism swept over their land they were never conquered .
They had been wise enough to see both Islam and , Christianity as just
another route to the slavery they had fought and died to avoid . They
remained steadfast in their own religion and, therefore, were called
"pagans ." But all of their children were born free, none in Muslim or
Christian slavery ; and their girls were never dragged off to become
slaves in the harems of Arabs, or as breeding girls for white men in the
West .

Finally, 1 referred to Blacks who, though forced to move, never left
their homeland region . The Noba did not move very far from where
they had lived from times immemorial . A far greater number of Blacks
held on in their ancient center after it was overrun, refusing either to
leave or be enslaved . They stayed and battled against the invaders,
finally, being concentrated in the southern provinces of the Sudan
where the earlier history of the race in Egypt is still being repeated, line
by line . And this is why it is so easy to understand the history of the
Blacks and see very clearly how they were not only forced far back
behind the advancing races, but also pushed to the lowest levels of
degradation . For that history is still being made today, covertly and
openly, for all the world to see . The Blacks who are under pressure
today in Bahr El Ghazal, Upper Nile and Equatoria are still fighting for
survival against the all-conquering Coloured Arabs just as their fore-
fathers fought five thousand years ago from the Mediterranean in
Lower Egypt to where they are now making a last stand . Romantic
history? Who needs it? They have been massacred by the hundreds and
villages left in ashes, but they fight on . This all-black region is kept
isolated and cut off from the developments and higher levels of life seen
in the Arab-dominated Sudan . These Southern Sudanese have

Page 192

382 The Destruction of Black Civilization Index 383

Slave



55raids, Transvaal, 274 Unkananga immigrants, 274,
Slave trade, 194, 239, 240, T Treaty of 652, 150, 151 278

252-254 Treaty of 1622, 264, 265, 269 Uansinas, 223
Smith, Ian, 190 Taghasa, salt mines of, 203 Tribal warfare, 164, 165 Uembe (Limpopo River), 274
Snefuru, 71, 100, 101, 122, 123 204 Tribes, 126
Soba, 156 Tagiya, 121 Tuaregs, 183
Sofala, 277, 278, 279 Taharqa, 117, 126 Tucolor peoples, 203
Soleb, 133 Tangasi, 121 Turin canon, 287
"Solominids," 139, 141, 273 Tamsoba, 217 Turks, 133
Songhay, 204, 205, f06, 210, Tanutamon, 117, 118, 127 Turz, Muhammed, 209 V

243 Tanzania, 313 Tutankhamen, 106, 110
Sorka, people, 204 Tarikh Al Sudan, 218-204 Twentieth Dynasty, 111 Vakaranga, 274, 277, 278
Soza, 197 Tarikh al Fatash, 204-218 Twenty-Second Dynasty, 113 Vasina, Jan, 220
South Africa, 29, 30, 276, 277, Tefnakhte, 114, 115 Twenty-Fifth Dynasty, 115 Von, Francois, 218

278, 282, 289, 294, Tegrur, 201, 204 116, 117, 134, 137 Voulet, 218
Southern Arabia, 251 Temple of Amon, 127 Twenty-Sixth Dynasty, 118
Southern Ethiopia, 104, 107, Ten Commandments, 135 137

113, 114, 133 Tenkamenin, Emperor, 198 Two Lands, 44, 59, 61, 64, 80, w
Southern Sudan, 152, 155 Tete, 282 99,146
Spirituals life, 355 Thebald, 88, 93, 115 "Two Niles," 129
Sphinx, 87 Thebans, 33 Tekour,197 Wadai, 183

"Starving time," 299, 300 Thebes, 61, 63, 64, 66, 80, 81, Wadi Halfa, 121
Wadi Hudi, 121Stone quarrying, 105 83, 84, 87, 90, 94, 95,

Strabo, 28, 362 102, 104, 106, 107, 114, 115, U Wagadu, 201Wagadugu,



of, 211peopleSudan, 35, 44, 50, 66, 80, 85 117, 118, 133
Wagadugu Kingdom, 210121, 145, 147, 155-159, 277 Theoretical freamework for

294,295 Destruction, 33, 35 Uganda, 131 Wangara gold mines, 200, 20

Thines, 61 Uli, Mausa Emperor, 202 War council, 116
Umm, 131 Wawa, 121Thinis, 67
United Arabs, 156 Wawat, 88, 99, 104Thinites, 33

Sudd, 45 Third World, 317 United Arab Republic, 103 Western land, 105
Sulieman-Mar, 204 "Throne of the Sun God," 125 United States, 117 Westernization process 247
Sultan, 151, 152 Thutmose 1, 106 Unity, the necessity of, 341 251
Sumanguru, Mandinka King, Thutmose II, 106 "University City," 88 Wezots, 304

204 Thutmose III, 109 University of Sankore, 198 White devils, 249, 250
Sun God, 123, 136 Timbuktu, 198, 204, 205 205 "White Egyptian," 98
Sunni, 204 Tin, 105, 275, 276, 279 Upper Egypt, 61, 81-83, 98, White Power, 141
Sun Temple, 127 Tippu, 183, 208 99, 102-105, 106, 112-115 Wilkinson, Sir Gardner, 86
Supreme God, 114, 142 Tiy, Queen, 110 115,118,121,146,151- Wobogo, Mohho Naba, 218
Supreme Pontiff, 246 Togoland, 218 152 Wo'se, 89, 90, 293
Swampland, 45 Togwa, 281, 284, 285 Upper Nile, 194 Women in slavery, 253, 254
Swazi, 288 Toynbee, Arnold, 185 Userkaf, 100 Woot, 223, 224
Syria, 105, 106, 117 Trading, Mossi States, 216 Usuda, 129 Writing, development of, 93

Page 193

384

Z

Zakuri, King, 150
Zambezi, 274, 279, 281, 282

288
Zambia, 225, 279, 282
Zanzibar Revolution, 71, 208

243
Zenaga, 197
Zimbabwe, 29, 30, 282
Zongagongos, 218
Zoser, 100
Zulu, council, 301, empire,

287,288
Zululand, 214

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