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TitleThe Analects of Confucius
LanguageEnglish
File Size327.2 KB
Total Pages214
Table of Contents
                            The Analects of Confucius
	Book I. Hsio R
	Book II. Wei Chang
	Book III. Pa Yih
	Book IV. Le Jim
	Book V. Kung-Ye Ch'ang
	Book VI. Yung Yey
	Book VII. Shu R
	Book VIII. T'ai Po
	Book IX. Tsze Han
	Book X. Jeang Tang
	Book XI. Hsien Tsin
	Book XII. Yen Yuan
	Book XIII. Tsze-Lu
	Book XIV. Hsien Wan
	Book XV. Wei Ling Kung
	Book XVI. Ke She
	Book XVII. Yang Ho
	Book XVIII. Wei Tsze
	Book XIX. Tsze-Chang
	Book XX. Tao Yueh
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

THE ANALECTS OF
CONFUCIUS

James Legge (trans.)

Styled by LimpidSoft

Page 2

Contents

The Analects of Confucius 4
Book I. Hsio R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Book II. Wei Chang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Book III. Pa Yih . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Book IV. Le Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Book V. Kung-Ye Ch’ang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Book VI. Yung Yey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Book VII. Shu R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Book VIII. T’ai Po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Book IX. Tsze Han . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Book X. Jeang Tang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Book XI. Hsien Tsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

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THE ANALECTS OF CONFUCIUS

XV

Tsze-kung asked which of the two, Shih or Shang, was
the superior. The Master said, ‘Shih goes beyond the due
mean, and Shang does not come up to it.’

‘Then,’ said Tsze-kung, ‘the superiority is with Shih, I
suppose.’

The Master said, ‘To go beyond is as wrong as to fall
short.’

XVI

The head of the Chi family was richer than the duke of
Chau had been, and yet Ch’iu collected his imposts for
him, and increased his wealth.

The Master said, ‘He is no disciple of mine. My little
children, beat the drum and assail him.’

XVII

Ch’ai is simple.
Shan is dull.
Shih is specious.
Yu is coarse.

107

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THE ANALECTS OF CONFUCIUS

XVIII

The Master said, ‘There is Hui! He has nearly attained
to perfect virtue. He is often in want.

‘Ts’ze does not acquiesce in the appointments of
Heaven, and his goods are increased by him. Yet his judg-
ments are often correct.’

XIX

Tsze-chang asked what were the characteristics of the
GOOD man. The Master said, ‘He does not tread in the
footsteps of others, but moreover, he does not enter the
chamber of the sage.’

XX

The Master said, ‘If, because a man’s discourse appears
solid and sincere, we allow him to be a good man, is he
really a superior man? or is his gravity only in appear-
ance?’

XXI

108

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THE ANALECTS OF CONFUCIUS

conduct government properly?’ The Master replied, ‘Let
him honour the �ve excellent, and banish away the four
bad, things;� then may he conduct government properly.’
Tsze-chang said, ‘What are meant by the �ve excellent
things?’ The Master said, ‘When the person in author-
ity is bene�cent without great expenditure; when he lays
tasks on the people without their repining; when he pur-
sues what he desires without being covetous; when he
maintains a digni�ed ease without being proud; when he
is majestic without being �erce.’

Tsze-chang said, ‘What is meant by being bene�cent
without great expenditure?’ The Master replied, ‘When
the person in authority makes more bene�cial to the peo-
ple the things from which they naturally derive bene�t;�
is not this being bene�cent without great expenditure?
When he chooses the labours which are proper, and
makes them labour on them, who will repine? When his
desires are set on benevolent government, and he secures
it, who will accuse him of covetousness? Whether he has
to do with many people or few, or with things great or
small, he does not dare to indicate any disrespect;� is not
this to maintain a digni�ed ease without any pride? He
adjusts his clothes and cap, and throws a dignity into his
looks, so that, thus digni�ed, he is looked at with awe;�

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THE ANALECTS OF CONFUCIUS

is not this to be majestic without being �erce?’
Tsze-chang then asked, ‘What are meant by the four

bad things?’ The Master said, ‘To put the people to death
without having instructed them;� this is called cruelty. To
require from them, suddenly, the full tale of work, with-
out having given them warning;� this is called oppres-
sion. To issue orders as if without urgency, at �rst, and,
when the time comes, to insist on them with severity;�
this is called injury. And, generally, in the giving pay or
rewards to men, to do it in a stingy way;� this is called
acting the part of a mere of�cial.’

III

The Master said, ‘Without recognising the ordinances
of Heaven, it is impossible to be a superior man.

‘Without an acquaintance with the rules of Propriety, it
is impossible for the character to be established

‘Without knowing the force of words, it is impossible
to know men.’

214

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