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TitleThe ADD myth : how to cultivate the unique gifts of intense personalities
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.5 MB
Total Pages184
Table of Contents
                            Title Page
Copyright
Dedication
Contents
Foreword
A Note to Readers
Introduction
1: There Is No Such Thing as ADHD
	THE DSM AND A CULTURE OF DISORDER
	MEDICATION GOES IN SEARCH OF PATIENTS
	WHY SCHOOLS AND PARENTS SEEK DIAGNOSIS
	NOT ALL DISTRESS OR DIFFERENCE IS MENTAL DISORDER
	THE DSM IS FALLIBLE
	TOO COMMON TO BE A DISORDER
	THERE IS NO PROOF OF DISORDER
	IF NOT DISORDER, THEN WHAT?
2: What Is Intensity?
	KAZIMIERZ DABROWSKI IDENTIFIES “SUPER-STIMULATABILITY”
	THE FIVE INTENSITIES
	INTENSITY: GIFT OR DISORDER?
3: Practice Foundations
	THE BODY AS THE SUBCONSCIOUS MIND
	THE GATEKEEPER BETWEEN THE SUBCONSCIOUS AND CONSCIOUS MINDS
	THE INTERNAL MAP OF REALITY
	EVERYTHING IS RELATED TO EVERYTHING
	THE DRUG TO END ALL DRUGS
	THE WITNESS
4: Sensual Intensity
	THE INTENSE SENSES
	HOW SENSUAL INTENSITY AFFECTS US
5: Sensual Practices: Make Me Safe and Warm
	Practice 1 PROTECTING YOUR SENSUALLY INTENSE SELF
	Practice 2 CREATING A SAFE AND HOSPITABLE WORLD
6: Psychomotor Intensity
	YOU ARE AN OPEN ENERGY SYSTEM
	PSYCHOMOTOR EFFECTS ON THE PHYSICAL DOMAIN
	PSYCHOMOTOR EFFECTS ON THE EMOTIONAL DOMAIN
	PSYCHOMOTOR EFFECTS ON THE MENTAL DOMAIN
	BEING IN THE FLOW
7: Psychomotor Practices: It's My Energy, Dammit!
	Practice 3 WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES
	Practice 4 BEING STILL AND CREATING FLOW
	Practice 5 EXERCISE AND BODY DISPOSITIONS
8: Intellectual Intensity
	DIFFERENT BRAINS
	INTELLECTUAL INTENSITY AND INTELLIGENCE
	LEARNING AND THINKING PATTERNS
	KEY TRAITS OF INTELLECTUAL INTENSITY
	CHALLENGES OF INTELLECTUAL INTENSITY
	INTENSITY AND VALUE SYSTEMS
	VALUE LEVELS OF DEVELOPMENT
9: Intellectual Practices: Building Intellectual Muscle
	Practice 6 THE MAGIC WORD
	Practice 7 CONCENTRATION ON A SUBJECT
	Practice 8 THE LOST ART OF CONTEMPLATION
	Practice 9 VALUE DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH
	A NOTE ON THE PRACTICES SO FAR
10: Creative Intensity
	IMAGINATION
	OVERACTIVE IMAGINATION
	INSPIRATION
	CREATIVITY AS THERAPY
	THOUGHT AS THE ULTIMATE CREATIVE MEDIUM
	CREATING MEANING, PURPOSE, AND IDEALS
	DREAMING TOO MUCH
11: Creative Practices: Becoming a Creator
	Practice 10 TAMING THE IMAGINATION CREATURE
	Practice 11 LIVING BACKWARD AND FORWARD IN TIME
	Practice 12 SEDUCING THE MUSE
	Practice 13 CREATIVITY IS IMAGINATION IN ACTION
12: Understanding Moods
	UNDERSTANDING MOODS
	MOOD ANIMALS AND MAKING CHANGE NATURALLY
13: Emotional Intensity
	THE INNER EXPERIENCE OF EMOTIONAL INTENSITY
	THE OUTWARD EXPRESSION OF EMOTIONAL INTENSITY
	DABROWSKI'S THEORY OF EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
	CARTOGRAPHY: BECOMING A MASTER MAPMAKER
14: Emotional Practices: Emotional Growth and Power
	Practice 14 MAPMAKING AT LEVEL 2
	Practice 15 MAPMAKING AT LEVEL 3
	Practice 16 MAPMAKING AT LEVEL 4
15: The Ghosts of Intensity Past, Present, and Future
	THE GHOST OF INTENSITY PAST: SERIOUSNESS
	THE GHOST OF INTENSITY PRESENT: PERFECTIONISM
	THE GHOST OF INTENSITY FUTURE: ANXIETY
	HOW TO BE THE LEADER OF THE GHOSTS
16: Living an Intense Life
	UNDERSTAND YOUR NATURE
	FIND SUPPORT FROM OTHERS
	TAKE ACTION
	CONCLUSION
Epilogue
Acknowledgments
Notes
About the Author
To Our Readers
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 92

We also know that early stimulation, identical to sensual intensity, causes
development of cognitive functioning in addition to emotional, behavioral,
motor, and social development. If sensual stimulation is causative for brain
development, it stands to reason that it could be playing a part in intellectual
intensity.26 In an experiment conducted at the University of Illinois, rats raised
in a sensually rich environment developed up to 25 percent more synapses per
nerve cell.27
Intellectual intensity is created by a brain that works differently. Picture the

brain of a nonintense person as a highway system with roads leading to other
roads. Thoughts travel these well-maintained and structured pathways. New
roads are designed and built, providing access to new information as it is
categorized and stored. The more often the roads are traveled, the wider they
become and the more accessible the information stored along that road. Now
picture the intense brain as something more like the Internet, with new
connections made very quickly, resulting in a network that can appear messy
and confusing. These two different approaches to thinking are sometimes called
linear and nonlinear thinking. Linear thinking is described as being rational,
logical, and analytical. Nonlinear thinking is more intuitive, creative, and
insightful. Intense people lean toward the nonlinear style of thinking. That
doesn't mean that we aren't logical or analytical. It does mean that we are able
to use intuition within analysis.

INTELLECTUAL INTENSITY AND INTELLIGENCE
While intellectually intense people are most certainly gifted, it may not be
reflected in an IQ test. Intellectual intensity is more a quality of how a person
learns and thinks than it is about IQ. IQ tests really measure two things, “fluid
intelligence” and “crystallized intelligence.” Fluid intelligence is the ability to
solve problems in novel situations. It doesn't rely as much on knowledge that
has already been acquired, but instead uses the ability to think in the here and
now. It still requires logic and analysis but doesn't depend on information
already stored about the situation. Crystallized intelligence is the ability to use
what has already been learned and stored. It is more likely to change as we gain
education and experience throughout life. Intellectually intense people will
likely score high in fluid intelligence due to the way an intense brain works
through association and patterns. The crystallized intelligence score may vary
depending on the person's cultural, social, and educational exposures. Basically,
for the person whose fluid intelligence is stronger than their crystallized
intelligence, it's easier to figure out something new than it is to memorize and

Page 93

retrieve information. This preference for figuring things out leads to a different
method of thinking.

We take information in differently. For the nonlinear thinker, the act of thinking
about something causes it to be stored in memory. Because we think about what
interests us, we more easily learn about things that are closely associated with
something else we find interesting, something that causes an emotional
response, or something that is unusual or novel. Because much of our learning
is driven by interest, the process is sometimes a feverish pursuit of information.
At some point in the process, the subject is completely absorbed. We call this
embodying the information. It becomes a part of us. We also take in
information outside of our areas of interest because of the lenient gatekeeper.
The gatekeeper allows more information and experience to pass through to
consciousness. In some cases children are fully aware of the subject matter
being taught in school before any formal education has been supplied. A casual
exposure to new ideas and concepts results in information coming in and being
stored. The result is a network that stores more information with looser
structure.
This Internet type of brain uses a function much like a web browser to

retrieve information. A question can be proposed, causing a wide search of the
information that has been fully embodied. Similarities are sought out in one of
many facets. One of the many advantages of this structure is that it allows
connections to be made between seemingly unrelated subjects. For example the
search may return a result where the pattern is similar, but the subject is
completely different. Like the results returned from a web browser, there are
many results from which to choose.
Schools are designed to teach the nonintense type of brain, the linear

thinking style. They use practice and repetition to create the pathways in order
to store the information. The nonintense child is well adapted to this approach
for learning. The intense child is only frustrated by it. When a math teacher
insists on seeing the “work” behind the answer to a question, he is looking for
evidence that the child has built and traveled the correct roads in order to store
the information. For the intense child, the road is not nearly as concrete. They
may intuitively know answers and not be able to “show” their work because
there wasn't any.

Page 183

TO OUR READERS

Conari Press, an imprint of Red Wheel/Weiser, publishes books on topics
ranging from spirituality, personal growth, and relationships to women's issues,
parenting, and social issues. Our mission is to publish quality books that will
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Visit our website where you can learn about our

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