Download Tess of the d'Urbervilles PDF

TitleTess of the d'Urbervilles
LanguageEnglish
File Size979.7 KB
Total Pages335
Table of Contents
                            Phase the First --- The Maiden
	I
	II
	III
	IV
	V
	VI
	VII
	VIII
	IX
	X
	XI
Phase the Second --- Maiden No More
	XII
	XIII
	XIV
	XV
Phase the Third --- The Rally
	XVI
	XVII
	XVIII
	XIX
	XX
	XXI
	XXII
	XXIII
	XXIV
Phase the Fourth --- The Consequence
	XXV
	XXVI
	XXVII
	XXVIII
	XXIX
	XXX
	XXXI
	XXXII
	XXXIII
	XXXIV
Phase the Fifth --- The Woman Pays
	XXXV
	XXXVI
	XXXVII
	XXXVIII
	XXXIX
	XL
	XLI
	XLII
	XLIII
	XLIV
Phase the Sixth --- The Convert
	XLV
	XLVI
	XLVII
	XLVIII
	XLIX
	L
	LI
	LII
Phase the Seventh --- Fulfilment
	LIII
	LIV
	LV
	LVI
	LVII
	LVIII
	LIX
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Contents

Phase the First — The Maiden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
VII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
VIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
XI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Phase the Second — Maiden No More . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
XII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
XIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
XIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
XV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Phase the Third — The Rally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
XVI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
XVII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
XVIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
XIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
XX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
XXI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
XXII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
XXIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
XXIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Phase the Fourth — The Consequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

Page 167

Phase the Fourth � The Consequence 163

`I like living like this.'
`But I must think of starting in business on my own hook with the new year,

or a little later. And before I get involved in the multifarious details of my new
position, I should like to have secured my partner.'

`But,' she timidly answered, `to talk quite practically, wouldn't it be best not
to marry till after all that? — Though I can't bear the thought o' your going away
and leaving me here!'

`Of course you cannot — and it is not best in this case. I want you to help me
in many ways in making my start. When shall it be? Why not a fortnight from
now?'

`No,' she said, becoming grave; `I have so many things to think of �rst.'
`But — '
He drew her gently nearer to him.
The reality of marriage was startling when it loomed so near. Before discus-

sion of the question had proceeded further there walked round the corner of the
settle into the full �relight of the apartment Mr. Dairyman Crick, Mrs. Crick, and
two of the milkmaids.

Tess sprang like an elastic ball from his side to her feet, while her face �ushed
and her eyes shone in the �relight.

`I knew how it would be if I sat so close to him!' she cried, with vexation. `I
said to myself, they are sure to come and catch us! But I wasn't really sitting on
his knee, though it might ha' seemed as if I was almost!'

`Well — if so be you hadn't told us, I am sure we shouldn't ha' noticed that ye
had been sitting anywhere at all in this light,' replied the dairyman. He continued
to his wife, with the stolid mien of a man who understood nothing of the emotions
relating to matrimony — `Now, Christianer, that shows that folks should never
fancy other folks be supposing things when they bain't. O no, I should never ha'
thought a word of where she was a sitting to, if she hadn't told me — not I'

`We are going to be married soon,' said Clare, with improvised phlegm.
`Ah — and be ye! Well, I am truly glad to hear it, sir. I've thought you mid

do such a thing for some time. She's too good for a dairymaid — I said so the
very �rst day I zid her — and a prize for any man; and what's more, a wonderful
woman for a gentleman-farmer's wife; he won't be at the mercy of his baily wi'
her at his side.'

Somehow Tess disappeared. She had been even more struck with the look of
the girls who followed Crick than abashed by Crick's blunt praise.

After supper, when she reached her bedroom, they were all present. A light
was burning, and each damsel was sitting up whitely in her bed, awaiting Tess,

Page 168

164 Phase the Fourth — The Consequence

the whole like a row of avenging ghosts.
But she saw in a few moments that there was no malice in their mood. They

could scarcely feel as a loss what they had never expected to have. Their condition
was objective, contemplative.

‘He’s going to marry her!’ murmured Retty, never taking eyes off Tess. ‘How
her face do show it!’

‘You be going to marry him?’ asked Marian.
‘Yes,’ said Tess.
‘When?’
‘Some day.’
They thought that this was evasiveness only.
‘Yes — going tomarry him — a gentleman!’ repeated Izz Huett.
And by a sort of fascination the three girls, one after another, crept out of their

beds, and came and stood barefooted round Tess. Retty put her hands upon Tess’s
shoulders, as if to realize her friend’s corporeality after such a miracle, and the
other two laid their arms round her waist, all looking into her face.

‘How it do seem! Almost more than I can think of!’ said Izz Huett.
Marian kissed Tess. ‘Yes,’ she murmured as she withdrew her lips.
‘Was that because of love for her, or because other lips have touched there by

now?’ continued Izz drily to Marian.
‘I wasn’t thinking o’ that,’ said Marian simply. ‘I was on’y feeling all the

strangeness o’t — that she is to be his wife, and nobody else. I don’t say nay to
it, nor either of us, because we did not think of it — only loved him. Still, nobody
else is to marry’n in the world — no fine lady, nobody in silks and satins; but she
who do live like we.’

‘Are you sure you don’t dislike me for it?’ said Tess in a low voice.
They hung about her in their white nightgowns before replying, as if they

considered their answer might lie in her look.
‘I don’t know — I don’t know,’murmured Retty Priddle. ‘I want to hate ’ee;

but I cannot!’
‘That’s how I feel,’ echoed Izz and Marian. ‘I can’t hate her. Somehow she

hinders me!’
‘He ought to marry one of you,’ murmured Tess.
‘Why?’
‘You are all better than I.’
‘We better than you?’ said the girls in a low, slow whisper. ‘No, no, dear

Tess!’

Page 334

330 Phase the Seventh � Ful�lment

stone and bent over her, holding one poor little hand; her breathing now was quick
and small, like that of a lesser creature than a woman. All waited in the growing
light, their faces and hands as if they were silvered, the remainder of their �gures
dark, the stones glistening green-gray, the Plain still a mass of shade. Soon the
light was strong, and a ray shone upon her unconscious form, peering under her
eyelids and waking her.

`What is it, Angel?' she said, starting up. `Have they come for me?'
`Yes, dearest,' he said. `They have come.'
`It is as it should be,' she murmured. `Angel, I am almost glad — yes, glad!

This happiness could not have lasted. It was too much. I have had enough; and
now I shall not live for you to despise me!'

She stood up, shook herself, and went forward, neither of the men having
moved.

`I am ready,' she said quietly.

LIX

The city of Wintoncester, that �ne old city, aforetime capital of Wessex, layamidst its convex and concave downlands in all the brightness and warmth of
a July morning. The gabled brick, tile, and freestone houses had almost dried off
for the season their integument of lichen, the streams in the meadows were low,
and in the sloping High Street, from the West Gateway to the mediaeval cross, and
from the mediaeval cross to the bridge, that leisurely dusting and sweeping was in
progress which usually ushers in an old-fashioned market-day.

From the western gate aforesaid the highway, as every Wintoncestrian knows,
ascends a long and regular incline of the exact length of a measured mile, leav-
ing the houses gradually behind. Up this road from the precincts of the city two
persons were walking rapidly, as if unconscious of the trying ascent — uncon-
scious through preoccupation and not through buoyancy. They had emerged upon
this road through a narrow barred wicket in a high wall a little lower down. They
seemed anxious to get out of the sight of the houses and of their kind, and this road
appeared to offer the quickest means of doing so. Though they were young they
walked with bowed heads, which gait of grief the sun's rays smiled on pitilessly.

One of the pair was Angel Clare, the other a tall budding creature — half girl,
half woman — a spiritualized image of Tess, slighter than she, but with the same

Page 335

Phase the Seventh � Ful�lment 331

beautiful eyes — Clare's sister-in-law, 'Liza-Lu. Their pale faces seemed to have
shrunk to half their natural size. They moved on hand in hand, and never spoke a
word, the drooping of their heads being that of Giotto's `Two Apostles.'

When they had nearly reached the top of the great West Hill the clocks in the
town struck eight. Each gave a start at the notes, and, walking onward yet a few
steps, they reached the �rst milestone, standing whitely on the green margin of the
grass, and backed by the down, which here was open to the road. They entered
upon the turf, and, impelled by a force that seemed to overrule their will, suddenly
stood still, turned, and waited in paralyzed suspense beside the stone.

The prospect from this summit was almost unlimited. In the valley beneath lay
the city they had just left, its more prominent buildings showing as in an isometric
drawing — among them the bread cathedral tower, with its Norman windows and
immense length of aisle and nave, the spires of St. Thomas's, the pinnacled tower
of the College, and, more to the right, the tower and gables of the ancient hospice,
where to this day the pilgrim may receive his dole of bread and ale. Behind the
city swept the rotund upland of St. Catherine's Hill; further off, landscape beyond
landscape, till the horizon was lost in the radiance of the sun hanging above it.

Against these far stretches of country rose, in front of the other city edi�ces,
a large red-brick building, with level gray roofs, and rows of short barred win-
dows bespeaking captivity, the whole contrasting greatly by its formalism with
the quaint irregularities of the Gothic erections. It was somewhat disguised from
the road in passing it by yews and evergreen oaks, but it was visible enough up
here. The wicket from which the pair had lately emerged was in the wall of this
structure. From the middle of the building an ugly �at-topped octagonal tower
ascended against the east horizon, and viewed from this spot, on its shady side
and against the light, it seemed the one blot on the city's beauty. Yet it was with
this blot, and not with the beauty, that the two gazers were concerned.

Upon the cornice of the tower a tall staff was �xed. Their eyes were riveted on
it. A few minutes after the hour had struck something moved slowly up the staff,
and extended itself upon the breeze. It was a black �ag.

`Justice' was done, and the President of the Immortals, in Aeschylean phrase,
had ended his sport with Tess. And the d'Urberville knights and dames slept on in
their tombs unknowing. The two speechless gazers bent themselves down to the
earth, as if in prayer, and remained thus a long time, absolutely motionless: the
�ag continued to wave silently. As soon as they had strength they arose, joined
hands again, and went on.

Similer Documents