Download Switching to a Mac for Dummies (ISBN - 0470466618) PDF

TitleSwitching to a Mac for Dummies (ISBN - 0470466618)
TagsFor Dummies
LanguageEnglish
File Size6.4 MB
Total Pages411
Table of Contents
                            Switching to a Mac for Dummies
	About the Author
	Dedication
	Author’s Acknowledgments
	Contents at a Glance
	Table of Contents
	Introduction
		About This Book
		Foolish Assumptions
		How This Book Is Organized
		Typographic Conventions
		Icons Used in This Book
		Where to Go from Here
	Part I: Informed Switching Starts Here
		Chapter 1: Why Switch? Demystifying the Mac Mantra
			Be Happy You Waited
			Take Your Best Shot
			Considering All Aspects — Advantage Apple
			Switching Sides Can Sting
		Chapter 2: Meet the Mac Family
			Checking Out Common Features
			Connecting on the Go with Your Apple Laptop
			Furnishing Your Lair with Mac Desktops
			Getting the Right Graphics Processor
			Adding On and Filling In
		Chapter 3: Deciding What to Buy
			Selecting a Conversion Strategy
			Figuring Out What’s on Your Windows Computer
			Navigating from PC to Mac Ports
			Using Your Old Equipment with a Mac
			Getting Ready to Buy
			Shopping for Your New Mac
	Part II: Making the Switch
		Chapter 4: The Big Day: Setting Up Your Mac
			Unpacking and Setting Up
			Configuring Your New Mac
		Chapter 5: Mac OS X for Windows Users
			PC and Mac: We Have a Lot in Common
			Adjusting to the Differences
			May I See the Menu, Please?
			Filing Away in OS X
			The Finder Is Your Friend
			Enjoying the Difference
		Chapter 6: Moving Files from Your PC to the Mac
			Backing Up and Movin’ On
			Recovering Data from a Damaged PC
			Dealing with Common File Types
			Purging Your Files Before Disposing of the Disk
		Chapter 7: Switching Applications
			Keeping Your Appointments with iCal
			Processing Words and Numbers
			Accessing Databases
			Finding Graphics and Design Programs
			Replacing Specialized Programs
			Adding Functionality As You Need It
	Part III: Connecting Hither and Yon
		Chapter 8: Getting Your Mac Online
			Using Your Current Internet Account
			Upgrading Your Internet Service
			Starting Up Your Web Browser
			Switching Your E-Mail to Your Mac
			Instant Messaging
		Chapter 9: Networking the Mac Way
			Getting Wired with Ethernet
			Networking Wirelessly
			Getting Personal with Bluetooth
			Networking in Other Ways
			Sharing Files over Your Network
		Chapter 10: Staying Secure in a Connected World
			What Makes a Mac More Secure?
			Protecting Yourself with Passwords
			Hardening OS X
	Part IV: More Software, More Choices
		Chapter 11: Easy Listening with iTunes
			The Magical iPod
			Getting Started with iTunes
			Filling iTunes with Music and More
		Chapter 12: Picturing iPhoto
			Getting Started with iPhoto
			Organizing the iPhoto Way
			Editing Your iPhotos
			Sharing Photos in Slide Shows and Prints
			Moving Up to Aperture
		Chapter 13: Producing Movies and Music on Your Mac
			Producing Your Own Epic with iMovie
			Burning Movies with iDVD
			Composing Using GarageBand
		Chapter 14: Building Your Space on the Web
			Creating a Web Site
			MobileMe for You
			Social Networking from your Mac
		Chapter 15: Enjoying Other OS X Goodies
			Adding Handy Widgets to the Dashboard
			Controlling Windows Fast with Exposé
			Organizing Work Areas with Spaces
			Searching for Files with Spotlight
			Saving Time with Automator and AppleScript
		Chapter 16: Oops, It’s a PC: Running Windows on Your Mac
			Pulling the Rabbit Out of the Hat
			Getting Started with Boot Camp
			Virtualize Me
			Imitation, the Sincerest Form of Flattery
	Part V: Specialty Switching Scenarios
		Chapter 17: Switching with the Whole Family in Mind
			Macs for Kids
			Macs for Seniors
			Macs for Specific Needs
		Chapter 18: Switching Your Business to Macs
			Why Use Macs in Your Business?
			Macs in Small Businesses
			Macs in Midsize Businesses
			Macs for the Enterprise
		Chapter 19: Desktop to Dashcode: OS X Advanced
			Peeking at the File System Structure
			Commanding Unix
			Developing Software on a Mac
	Part VI: The Part of Tens
		Chapter 20: Ten Terrific Troubleshooting Tips
			Take Care of First Things First
			Watch the Spinning Beach Ball
			Reboot a Hung Mac
			Reconnect to the Internet
			Handle Printing Problems
			Reset Passwords
			Eject CDs, DVDs, and Flash Drives
			Track Down Weird Noises
			Prevent Running Out of Disk Space
			Keep Your Mac Safe and in Tiptop Shape
			Find Help
		Chapter 21: Ten Ways Your Mac Can Help the Planet
			Saving Energy with Energy Saver
			Organizing Your Accessories for Power Savings
			Running on Alternative Power
			Monitoring Power Use
			iChat AV: The Green Way to Visit
			Automating Your Home
			Living the Paperless Portable Life
			Curing Cancer
			Retiring Old Electronics Responsibly
			Switching a Friend to a Mac
		Chapter 22: Ten Creative Uses for Your Old PC
			Sell It on Craigslist
			Load Ubuntu Linux on It
			Give It to Charity
			Use It as a Pedestal
			Have Your Kids Take It Apart
			Enjoy It As Art
			Use It for Target Practice
			Disconnect from the Internet
			Keep It for Old Media
			Recycle It Safely
	Mac Speak versus Windows Speak: A Translation Glossary
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Arnold Reinhold

Learn to:
• Choose the Mac that’s right for you

• Transfer your files from Windows®

• Connect your Mac to the Internet by
using a wireless network

• Get the most from Mac OS® X Snow
Leopard™ and create cool projects
with the iLife® suite

Switching to a Ma


2nd EditionMaking Everythin
g Easier!



Open the book and find:

• How a Mac can simplify your life

• Special advice for seniors and
parents of young kids

• Tips on keeping your Mac updated
and secure

• Ways to unleash your creativity
with photos, audio, and video

• How to configure your new Mac

• Help with switching specialized
software to your Mac

• Mac networking instructions

• How to get both WiFi and backup
capability by using Time Capsule®

Arnold Reinhold has more than three decades of experience in

the software industry. His first Apple product was a Mac 512. He has

coauthored numerous books, including Green IT For Dummies.

Personal Computers/Macintosh

$24.99 US / $29.99 CN / £17.99 UK

ISBN 978-0-470-46661-2

Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step examples,

how-to articles, or to shop the store!

Switching is almost as easy
as using a Mac, and we’ll
guide you all the way!
So you’ve decided to join the more intuitive, less virus-
prone world of the Mac? Congratulations! This book tells
you what to expect, how to choose a Mac (if you haven’t
already), and how to make the switch a breeze. Discover all
the cool preloaded software, how to make your Mac talk to
your iPhone™ and iPod®, and how to work the Mac way.

• Meet the family — compare MacBooks and the Mac mini, iMac®,
and Mac Pro

• I’m a Mac, and you’re leaving a PC — see what’s alike and what’s
different, and learn to use Apple menus and the Finder

• Can I keep it? — find out what peripherals will still work with
your Mac

• Moving day — transfer your files, address book, and content
stored on other media

• Get connected — set up your Internet service and e-mail
application, and connect to your printer and other peripherals

• iLove all these apps — play, buy, and organize music with

iTunes®; edit, sort, and share photos with iPhoto®; make movies

with iMovie®; and more

• Safety first — learn what makes Macs safer and why strong
passwords are still important

• If you just can’t say goodbye — see how to run Windows® on
your Mac

Sw
itch

in
g

to
a

M
a

c
®

Reinhold

2nd Edition

spine=.816”

Page 2

Start with FREE Cheat Sheets
Cheat Sheets include
• Checklists
• Charts
• Common Instructions
• And Other Good Stuff!

Get Smart at Dummies.com
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of answers on everything from removing wallpaper
to using the latest version of Windows.

Check out our
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Plus, each month you can win valuable prizes by entering
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Get More and Do More at Dummies.com®

To access the Cheat Sheet created specifically for this book, go to
www.dummies.com/cheatsheet/switchingtoamac

spine=.816”

Page 205

187 Chapter 9: Networking the Mac Way
2. Run an Ethernet cable from each computer you want to wire to the

network to one of the router’s LAN ports.

If you have a Wi-Fi router, you don’t need to run a cable to a Wi-Fi-

equipped computer, though you can if you want.

3. Hook up power to your router.

Typically, you plug the power unit that came with the router into an

outlet on the wall or a power strip and then plug the power unit’s wire

into your router.

Configuring your router
Your router sits on your network like any other computer. Most routers —

but not Apple’s, which I explain in a bit — put up their own Web site on your

local network that you access with any Web browser, such as Safari. You

configure the router through this Web site. Don’t confuse this Web site with

the router manufacturer’s Web site, such as www.linksys.com. The one
you use to change settings is literally inside your router and is accessible

only from computers on your local network.

Your router keeps one internal IP address for itself, and you need to know

that numeric address to access the browser’s Web site. The default address

your browser uses is in its manual. In case you lost it, here are the IP

addresses most often used by popular manufacturers, though the one used

for your model may vary:

✓ D-Link:192.168.0.1

✓ Linksys: 192.168.1.1

✓ Netgear: 192.168.0.1

✓ SMC: 192.168.2.1

✓ USRobotics: 192.168.123.254

With the IP address in hand, you can set up your router as follows:

1. Open your Web browser and type your router’s IP address on the

address bar.

For most SMC routers, you type 192.168.2.1 in your browser’s address

bar to access the router’s Web page.

2. When the router’s logon screen appears and asks for a password and,

on many models, a username, enter the information that’s requested.

15_466612-ch09.indd 18715_466612-ch09.indd 187 8/7/09 12:15:40 AM8/7/09 12:15:40 AM

Page 206

188 Part III: Connecting Hither and Yon
If you assigned a password and forgot it, the simplest thing to do is to

reset the router. However, you lose any configuration information, such

as game ports, you had previously set up. You might first try one of the

common default passwords: admin, password, 1234, 12345, and none
(that is, leave the password field blank).

If all else fails, reset your router. You can often press a small button

hidden behind a hole in back of the case. The standard method is to

use a toothpick or straightened paper clip. After it resets, your router

accepts a default username and password. Again, check your manual.

If you don’t know your router’s default password, try the ones listed

previously or check the booklet that came with the router. If you can’t

find it, check the manufacturer’s Web site. It helps to know the router’s

model number, too. Also, this Web site compiles default usernames and

passwords for routers: www.phenoelit-us.org/dpl/dpl.html.

3. After you get past the router’s logon screen, you see what looks like

a miniature Web site with many pages you can navigate to change

settings.

Figure 9-3 shows a typical router configuration page.



Figure 9-3:
An SMC
router’s

configura-
tion screen.



Exactly what you can do varies by model, but common capabilities

include these actions:

• Set a new username and password.

• Configure how your router connects to your high-speed Internet

modem.

15_466612-ch09.indd 18815_466612-ch09.indd 188 8/7/09 12:15:40 AM8/7/09 12:15:40 AM

Page 410

392 Switching to a Mac For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Web sites (continued)

images, 259–260

photos, 259–260

publishing, 260–261

themes, 259

widgets, 260

Web-based offi ce applications, 149–150

Webcams, 248

WebClips, 270

WebObjects for Java, 52

Web 2.0, 314

weird noises, 337

WEP (wired equivalent privacy), 190, 376

whitelist, 376

widgets, 122, 260, 267–270, 376

Wi-Fi

access points, 71, 164, 189, 191–192, 377

confi guring, 191–193

defi ned, 376

interference problems, 195–196

Internet connect, 89, 162, 164, 194–195

name, 92

password, 92–93

ports, 64

routers, 71–72

security, 93, 164, 190

speed, 72, 189–190

support, 13, 24

transferring fi les with, 127–129

WEP, 190, 376

WPA, 190, 377

Window menu, 111

Window Shade, 376

windows, 106–107

Windows Genuine Advantage, 279, 377

Windows keyboard, 68

Windows Media Player, 377

Windows operating system

API translation, 278, 284–285

applications, 284

CE, 376

comparision to Mac OS X, 99–100, 124

drivers, 279

dual-booting, 278, 280–281

iTunes, 19, 223

security, 286

virtualization, 278, 281–283, 314

viruses, 286

Vista, 10, 14, 376

Windows 7, 10, 14

XP, 10, 14, 377

Windows System Restore program, 132

Wine project, 284–285

Wintel, 18

wiping hard drive, 139

wired equivalent privacy (WEP), 190, 376

wireless devices, 68–69, 86

wireless protected access (WPA), 190, 377

wireless wide-area network (WWAN), 167, 377

.wma fi les, 136

word processing, 143–151

work areas, 272

• X •
X11 windowing standard, 377

Xcode, 327

XLR connector, 377

Xsan, 42, 52

Xserve, 34–35, 40–42, 88

• Y •
Yahoo!

Mail, 176–177

Messenger, 181

yarrow, 377

Yellow Box, 377

• Z •
zero confi guration, 377

zero-day exploit, 377

ZFS fi le system, 328, 377

Zip disks/drive, 131, 378

Zoho, 150

Zoom feature, 305

Zune, 378

33_466612-bindex.indd 39233_466612-bindex.indd 392 8/7/09 12:34:43 AM8/7/09 12:34:43 AM

Page 411

97804704666152499.eps


Arnold Reinhold

Learn to:
• Choose the Mac that’s right for you

• Transfer your files from Windows®

• Connect your Mac to the Internet by
using a wireless network

• Get the most from Mac OS® X Snow
Leopard™ and create cool projects
with the iLife® suite

Switching to a Ma


2nd EditionMaking Everythin
g Easier!



Open the book and find:

• How a Mac can simplify your life

• Special advice for seniors and
parents of young kids

• Tips on keeping your Mac updated
and secure

• Ways to unleash your creativity
with photos, audio, and video

• How to configure your new Mac

• Help with switching specialized
software to your Mac

• Mac networking instructions

• How to get both WiFi and backup
capability by using Time Capsule®

Arnold Reinhold has more than three decades of experience in

the software industry. His first Apple product was a Mac 512. He has

coauthored numerous books, including Green IT For Dummies.

Personal Computers/Macintosh

$24.99 US / $29.99 CN / £17.99 UK

ISBN 978-0-470-46661-2

Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step examples,

how-to articles, or to shop the store!

Switching is almost as easy
as using a Mac, and we’ll
guide you all the way!
So you’ve decided to join the more intuitive, less virus-
prone world of the Mac? Congratulations! This book tells
you what to expect, how to choose a Mac (if you haven’t
already), and how to make the switch a breeze. Discover all
the cool preloaded software, how to make your Mac talk to
your iPhone™ and iPod®, and how to work the Mac way.

• Meet the family — compare MacBooks and the Mac mini, iMac®,
and Mac Pro

• I’m a Mac, and you’re leaving a PC — see what’s alike and what’s
different, and learn to use Apple menus and the Finder

• Can I keep it? — find out what peripherals will still work with
your Mac

• Moving day — transfer your files, address book, and content
stored on other media

• Get connected — set up your Internet service and e-mail
application, and connect to your printer and other peripherals

• iLove all these apps — play, buy, and organize music with

iTunes®; edit, sort, and share photos with iPhoto®; make movies

with iMovie®; and more

• Safety first — learn what makes Macs safer and why strong
passwords are still important

• If you just can’t say goodbye — see how to run Windows® on
your Mac

Sw
itch

in
g

to
a

M
a

c
®

Reinhold

2nd Edition

spine=.816”

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