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TitleStructural and Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Indigenisation: On Multilingualism and Language Evolution
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LanguageEnglish
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Table of Contents
                            Preface
Map of Cameroon
Contents
Contributors
Chapter-1
	Introduction—Indigenisation and Multilingualism: Extending the Debate on Language Evolution in Cameroon
		1.1 Overview and Aims
		1.2 Indigenisation: Multilingual Ecologies and Repertoires
		1.3 Linguistic levels of Indigenisation
		1.4 Sources of Indigenised Features
		1.5 Structure of the Volume
			1.5.1 Part I. Structural Perspectives on Indigenisation: Syntax and Phonology
			1.5.2 Part II. Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Indigenisation: Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics
		1.6 A Few Closing Remarks
		References
Part I
	Structural Perspectives on Indigenisation—Syntax and Phonology
		Chapter-2
			‘That-clauses’ in Cameroon English: A Study in Functional Extension
				2.1 Introduction
				2.2 That-complement Clauses
				2.3 Super-ordinate Clause Deletion for Echo-questions
				2.4 Conclusion
				References
		Chapter-3
			Pronoun-Like Usage in Cameroon English: The Case of Copy, Resumptive, Obligation, and Dummy Pronouns
				3.1 Introduction
				3.2 Indigenisation: On Cameroon English and its Ecology
				3.3 Semantic Pressure
				3.4 Pronoun-Like Usages in Cameroon English: An Analysis
				3.5 Conclusion
				References
		Chapter-4
			Les camerounismes: Essai d’une (nouvelle) typologie
				4.1 Introduction
				4.2 Ecologie du français au Cameroun
				4.3 Qu’est-ce qu’un camerounisme?
				4.4 Entre camerounismes simples et camerounismes complexes
				4.5 Camerounismes et fautes
				4.6 Conclusion
				Références bibliographiques
		Chapter-5
			Intonation in Cameroon English
				5.1 Introduction
				5.2 Some Previous Statements on Cameroon English Intonation
				5.3 Intonational Highlighting of Information in Cameroon English
				5.4 Tones at Intermediate and Intonational Phrase Boundaries
				5.5 Conclusion and Discussion
				References
		Chapter-6
			Ethnolinguistic Heterogeneity in Cameroon English Pronunciation
				6.1 Introduction
				6.2 Ethnolects and Substrate Influence
				6.3 Ethnolinguistic Heterogeneity in CamE Pronunciation: An Overview
				6.4 Ethnolinguistic Overview of Lamnso’ and Limbum
				6.5 Data and Methodology
				6.6 Ethnolectal Features in NsoE and WimE: A Case Study
				6.7 Conclusion
				References
Part II
	Sociolinguistic Perspectives onIndigenisation—Sociolinguisticsand Pragmatics
		Chapter-7
			Attitudes Towards Cameroon English:A Sociolinguistic Survey
				7.1 Prologue
				7.2 Introduction
				7.3 Indigenised Varieties of English: A History of Attitudes
				7.4 Cameroon English: Some Recent Studies on Attitudes
				7.5 The Survey
				7.6 Results and Discussion
				7.7 Cameroon English as L1: Emerging Native Speaker Populations
				7.8 Conclusion
				References
		Chapter-8
			Gender and the use of Tags in Cameroon English Discourse
				8.1 Introduction
				8.2 Gender and tag Usage Across Cultures: Between the West and Cameroon
				8.3 The Data and Categorisation
				8.4 Analysis: Tag Usage in Different Contexts
				8.5 The Questionnaire Survey: Who Uses Tags?
				8.6 Conclusion
				References
		Chapter-9
			Ethnicité, politesse et représentations au Cameroun
				9.1 Introduction
				9.2 Quelques précisitions terminologiques
				9.3 Méthodologie
				9.4 Résultats et discussion
				9.5 Conclusion
				Bibliographie
		Chapter-10
			Address Strategies in Cameroon Pidgin English: A Socio-Pragmatic Perspective
				10.1 Introduction
				10.2 Politeness and Address Modes in Multilingual Postcolonial Communities
				10.3 Findings and Discussion
				10.4 On Choices in Addressing or Naming Interactants
				10.5 Conclusion
				References
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
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Page 217

Index212

Pragmatics, 15
Pragmatique postcoloniale, 168
Pratiques langagières, 73, 168, 172
Prestige, 123, 124, 126, 130, 134, 135, 140
Pronominal usage, 7, 51
Pronoun-like elements, 11
Pronoun-like usages, 40, 43, 50
Pronoun usage, 7

Q
Quirk, R., 31, 123, 124

R
Referring back expressions, 40
Renaud, P., 58–60
Représentation sociales, 168, 169
Respect, 1, 2, 8, 14, 44, 84, 146, 155, 191,

192, 194, 196, 198–202
Resumptive pronouns, 12, 40, 44–47
Rising tone, 12, 29, 30, 92–96
Rosner, B., 94

S
Sala, B.M., 2, 7, 24, 25, 35, 36, 40–42, 46, 50,

51, 106, 122, 123
Schmied, J., 123
Schneider, E.W., 2, 40, 42, 50, 124
Schneider, G., 4, 18
Schröder, A., 7, 62
Semantic pressure, 40, 42, 43
Semantics, 2
Sey, K.A., 125
Sidner, C., 87
Simo Bobda, A., 2, 6, 7, 10, 24, 41, 51, 63, 83,

106, 108, 112, 122, 126, 153
Simo-Souop, A., 59
Singler, J.V., 82
Social attitudes, 135
Social behaviour, 146, 164
Social decorum, 8
Social identity, 13, 15
Social prestige, 13, 125, 128
Sociocultural context, 164, 190
Sociocultural ecology, 8
Sociohistorical communities, 6
Sociolinguistic instantiations, 14
Sociolinguists, 39
Socio-pragmatic features, 12
Sol, M.D., 57
Song, P.N., 107
Speakers’ attitudes, 130
Spencer, J., 51
Spender, D., 148, 150
Standard British English (SBE), 84, 122

Standard Cameroonian French (SCF), 58, 59,
64, 77

Standard grammar, 140
Standardisation, 5, 12, 24, 50, 51
Storch, A., 43, 44
Strangerness gap, 203
Submissive speech, 154
Substrate, 11, 12, 15, 44, 45, 104, 107, 108,

112, 113, 115, 117
Substrate base, 9–11
Substrate influence, 104, 105, 108, 110
Substrate linguistic base, 8
Substrate transfer, 105
Substratum, 5, 6, 12, 46, 47
Substratum influence, 13, 132
Sunderland, J., 147, 150
Superordinate clause deletion, 30
Superstrate, 11, 15
Syntactic variation, 24, 25, 36
System-based features, 1

T
Tabi-Manga, J., 57
Tag questions, 13, 146, 148–153, 156–160,

163, 164
Tag types, 14, 146, 148, 153, 159–161, 164
Tag usage, 14, 146, 147, 152, 156, 160–164
Talbot, M., 151
Tamfu, E.N., 113
Tamfu, M.W., 107
Tench, P., 97
That-clauses, 11, 24, 35, 36
That-complements, 11, 25–28
Todd, L., 2, 122
Tone and Break Indices (ToBI) notation, 82
Toni, A., 191
Tourneux, H., 60, 76
Touzeil, J.C., 64, 76
Trace guilt, 40, 46, 47
Translanguaging, 123, 126
Trilateral process, 108
Trudgill, P., 24
Tsofack, J.-B., 7, 57, 59
Tswana English, 105

V
van Rooy, B., 105, 112
Venditti, J., 82
Vigner, G., 58
Vincent, D., 169
Vocalic processes, 13, 104, 108, 111
Vowel alternation, 106, 112
Vowel lowering, 13, 111, 113–115
Vowel shortening, 13, 111, 113, 115

Page 218

Index 213

W
Wald, P., 58, 77
Walker, M.A., 105, 108
Wamba, S.R., 7
Wardhaugh, R., 192
Warren, P., 85
Watt, D.L., 97
Wells, J.C., 113
Wennerstrom, A., 95
Wimbum English (WimE), 104, 107, 109,

112–115
case studies of, 110, 111
ethnic variation in, 111
speakers of, 111

Wolf, H.-G., 7
Wolfson, N., 190, 198
World Englishes, 2, 40, 83

Y
Yankson, K.E., 125
Yusimbom, M.Z., 106
Yuyun, D.T., 106

Z
Zang Zang, P., 7, 57, 64
Ze Amvela, E., 58
Zeitlyn, D., 109

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