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Table of Contents
                            Title page
Declaration
SUMMARY
Key terms
CONTENTS
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 9
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 12
APPENDIX 1
APPENDIX 2
BIBLIOGRAPHY
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

South Africa’s Axial Religious Transformation:


The Utilization of the Axial Hebrew Prophets’
Response Models in the Revision of South Africa’s

Maladaptive Pre-Axial Response Models



by


Lilian Krawitz



Submitted in accordance with the requirements for the degree of



Master of Biblical Archaeology


at the


University of South Africa



Supervisors: Prof C L van Wyk Scheepers
Dr M Le Roux






March 2007.

Page 132

121

• these beings, with supernatural powers that are referred to as

ancestors/ancestral spirits30, in the ATR context, are also recognised

by a segment of the mainstream monotheistic religions. They call their

supernatural beings saints, angels or even God and these particular

beings all exhibit the same trait: they are all perceived as supernatural

beings with supernatural powers who are able to intervene in the affairs

of human beings and everything else that exists in the
mundane/earthly/profane realm, regardless of the religious belief

system to which they belong.



• that in some belief systems, such as ATR, all their followers believe in

supernatural beings and supernatural intervention, whereas in other

religious belief systems only a certain number (not all) of people

believe in supernatural beings and supernatural intervention.



• The ATR coupled cosmological realm perceptual framework is not

confined to ATR belief systems, certain African Christian hybrid

churches or to Africa. The continued existence of a coupled

cosmological realm within current Christian belief systems is clearly

illustrated by the 31% of Americans who believe in an Authoritarian

God. This is seen in the statistics, below, from Time Magazine,

November 6 2006. (Vol.168:20. pg 32,33).



Time Magazine’s Faith In Figures survey, from their editorial, America

By the Numbers, (Adams, Caplan, Dell and Masters 2006:32-33)

reveals that 9 out of 10 Americans believe that ‘there is something

bigger out there’. The report indicates that 68% have no doubt God

exists, 14% believe in a cosmic, higher power, 11% believe in God but

with some doubts and 5% do not believe in anything beyond the

physical world. Yet, the report shows that although 85% of Americans

follow the Christian faith, they clearly do not all believe in the same

concepts.

30 Magesa (2002:54) notes that in some West African societies the ancestral spirits extensive
power has led people to refer to them as ‘gods’.

Page 133

122



The report also indicates that the largest segments of believers are

Evangelical Protestants, who emphasise the authority of the Bible,

salvation through a personal relationship with Jesus and the need to

share their faith with others. However, most Evangelicals prefer to be

known as “Bible-believing” or “Born-again” Christians.



53% of the believers in an Authoritarian God, are African Americans.

These statistics are drawn from a survey known as American Piety in

the 21st Century of I,721 randomly selected respondents which was

conducted by researchers from Baylor University.



How Americans see God:

• 31% believe in an Authoritarian God.

This is a God who is deeply involved in daily life and world

events. This God is angry at sin and can punish the unfaithful or

the ungodly. This view is shared by 53% of the African

Americans, as well as by the 56% who strongly believe that God

is a “he”.



• 23% believe in a Benevolent God.

This is a God who is deeply involved in daily life and world

events but is mainly a positive force reluctant to punish. Only

13% of people under 30 hold this view.



• 16% believe in a Critical God.

This is a God who does not really interact with the world but is

unhappy with its current state and will exact divine justice. This

view is prevalent on the eastern USA (21%), while in the west

the figures are 14%.



• 24% believe in a Distant God.

Page 263

252


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