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TitleRevolutionary Recipes for Better Living
LanguageEnglish
File Size3.0 MB
Total Pages635
Table of Contents
                            Introduction
PART I: EATING LIKE FOOD MATTERS
Food Policy, Made Personal
Turning the Tables on Animal Consumption
The Story of Junk
An Introduction to Sane Eating
Thinking Like Food Matters
PART II: COOKING LIKE FOOD MATTERS
Debunking Some Myths
What Ingredients Matter
A Word About Technique
Using The Food Matters Cookbook
PART III: THE RECIPES
Appetizers and Snacks
Soups
Salads and Dressings
Pasta, Noodles, and Dumplings
Rice and Grains
Beans
Vegetables
Bread, Pizza, Sandwiches, and Wraps
Desserts and Sweet Snacks
PART IV: RECIPE LISTS, SOURCES, AND INDEX
Where to Find: Fast Recipes
Where to Find: Make-Ahead Recipes
Where to Find: Recipes for Pantry Staples
Measurement Conversions
Sources: Books, Journals, Magazines, Online Resources, and Databases
Acknowledgments
Index
page 13
page 35
page 32
page 9
page 18
page 268
page 27
page 554
pages 26
page 29
page 518
pages 571
pages 589
page 276
page 44
page 421
page 355
page 356
page 361
page 505
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 317

dollar size for an addictive appetizer (serve a bowl of the sauce alongside for
dipping) or make larger patties for a main course—they’re great with plain rice
or millet and some simply cooked greens.

¼ cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice vinegar or sake
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon minced garlic, optional
1 teaspoon minced ginger, optional
2 cups fresh or frozen edamame
1 egg
½ cup sliced scallions
Whole wheat, brown rice, or all-purpose flour as needed
Salt and black pepper
Vegetable oil, for frying

. Heat the oven to 200°F. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Combine the soy sauce,
rice vinegar, half the sesame oil, sugar, and garlic and ginger if you’re using
them, in a small bowl.

. Add the edamame to the boiling water and cook until tender, 5 to 10 minutes.
Drain, reserving 1 cup of the cooking liquid.

. Transfer the beans to a food processor and pulse a couple of times to break
them down, then add the remaining 1 tablespoon sesame oil, egg, and scallions.
Process until combined but not finely puréed; you want a thick batter with some
texture that drops from a spoon. If the mixture is too stiff, stir in a little of the
reserved cooking liquid; if too wet, add a little flour. Sprinkle with salt and
pepper and stir until the mixture is thoroughly combined.

. Put a large skillet or griddle over medium heat. When a few drops of water
dance on its surface, add a thin film of oil. Working in batches, spoon on the
batter, making any size pancakes you like. Cook until the top sets and the bottom
is browned, about 4 minutes. Turn and cook the other side for a couple minutes
more. Keep the finished griddle cakes in the warm oven while you finish the
others. Serve hot or at room temperature with the soy drizzling sauce.

Before making the pancakes,
toast 1 or 2 dried hot red chiles (like red Thai, chipotle, or pequín) in a dry skillet

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over medium heat for a minute or 2 on each side, then soak them in boiling
water until soft, 15 to 30 minutes. Drain the chiles and remove and discard the
seeds and veins if you like. Purée in a food processor or blender with 2
tablespoons sesame seeds and the remaining drizzling sauce ingredients, adding
a few drops of water if necessary, until smooth. Proceed with the recipe from
Step 2.

Whisk together 2 tablespoons
any miso paste, ¼ cup warm water or sake, 1 teaspoon mirin or honey, 1
teaspoon rice vinegar, and a little salt. Serve the pancakes with this instead of the
soy drizzling sauce.

4 servings About 2 hours, largely unattended

Soy sauce and tomatoes are a wonderful combination, and along with the tofu,
they contribute to making this unconventional chili a real winner. The tofu takes
on a tremendous amount of flavor by the time the beans are done cooking, and
the texture becomes surprisingly meaty. On the flip side, if you want the tofu to
lend a little of its own flavor to the chili, try starting with smoked tofu.

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 block firm or extra-firm tofu (about 1 pound), blotted dry
1 bunch scallions, chopped
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced ginger
2 teaspoons five-spice powder, or ½ teaspoon ground cloves
1 dried hot chile (like Thai), or to taste
One 28-ounce can tomatoes, chopped; include their juice
2 cups dried black, pinto, or soy beans, rinsed, picked over, and soaked
if you like
2 tablespoons soy sauce, plus more for serving
Salt and black pepper
¼ cup chopped peanuts, for garnish
½ cup chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish

. Put the oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. When it’s hot,
crumble in the tofu and cook, stirring occasionally, until well browned, 5 to 10

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Table of Contents
Introduction
PART I: EATING LIKE FOOD MATTERS
Food Policy, Made Personal
Turning the Tables on Animal Consumption
The Story of Junk
An Introduction to Sane Eating
Thinking Like Food Matters
PART II: COOKING LIKE FOOD MATTERS
Debunking Some Myths
What Ingredients Matter
A Word About Technique
Using The Food Matters Cookbook
PART III: THE RECIPES
Appetizers and Snacks
Soups
Salads and Dressings
Pasta, Noodles, and Dumplings
Rice and Grains
Beans
Vegetables
Bread, Pizza, Sandwiches, and Wraps
Desserts and Sweet Snacks
PART IV: RECIPE LISTS, SOURCES, AND INDEX
Where to Find: Fast Recipes
Where to Find: Make-Ahead Recipes
Where to Find: Recipes for Pantry Staples
Measurement Conversions
Sources: Books, Journals, Magazines, Online Resources, and Databases
Acknowledgments
Index
page 13
page 35
page 32
page 9
page 18

Page 635

page 268
page 27
page 554
pages 26
page 29
page 518
pages 571
pages 589
page 276
page 44
page 421
page 355
page 356
page 361
page 505

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