Download Review of services for people living with HIV in New Zealand PDF

TitleReview of services for people living with HIV in New Zealand
LanguageEnglish
File Size757.8 KB
Total Pages84
Table of Contents
                            ACRONYMS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
	About the author
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
	SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDED RESPONSES TO ISSUES IDENTIFIED
INTRODUCTION
	Structure of this report
METHODOLOGY
	1. SITE SELECTION AND REPORT DESK REVIEWS
	2. SITE VISITS AND KEY STAKEHOLDER DISCUSSIONS
	3. REPORT PREPARATION
	4. FINAL DRAFT PREPARATION AND SUBMISSION
RESULTS
	1. DISTRICT HEALTH BOARD SERVICES FOR PLHA
		A. AUCKLAND DISTRICT HEALTH BOARD (www.adhb.govt.nz)
			Infectious diseases
			Sexual health
			Prevention
			Future investment
		B. WAIKATO DISTRICT HEALTH BOARD (www.waikatodhb.govt.nz)
			Infectious diseases
			Sexual health services
			Reaching minorities
		C. CAPITAL AND COAST DISTRICT HEALTH BOARD (www.ccdhb.org.nz)
			Infectious diseases
			Sexual health services
		D. CANTERBURY DISTRICT HEALTH BOARD (www.cdhb.govt.nz)
			The Department of Infectious Diseases
			Sexual health services
		E. SUMMARY OF ISSUES EMERGING FROM THE REVIEW OF DHB SERVICES FOR PLHA
	2. NON-GOVERNMENT ORGANISATION SERVICES FOR PLHA
		A. NEW ZEALAND AIDS FOUNDATION (www.nzaf.org.nz)
			Positive Health services summary
			1. HIV tests (22 positive results confirmed)
			2. Syphilis tests (18 positive results confirmed)
			Auckland – Burnett Centre
			Christchurch – Te Toka Centre
			Wellington – Awhina Centre
		B. FAMILY PLANNING (www.familyplanning.org.nz)
		C. POSITIVE WOMEN INC (www.positivewomen.co.nz)
		D. BODY POSITIVE INC (www.bodypositive.org.nz)
			Clinics
			Events
			Support
			Social activities/services
			Publications
			Gaps
		E. INA HIV/AIDS FOUNDATION CHARITABLE TRUST (www.ina.maori.nz)
		F. SUMMARY OF ISSUES EMERGING FROM THE REVIEW OF NON-GOVERNMENT ORGANISATION SERVICES FOR PLHA
			Stigma and the Ottawa Charter
			Varying approaches to HIV testing
			Difficulties in maintaining quality responses to constituents’ needs
			NGOs being used as proxy services for primary health care, mental health and social work services
			The need for a framework for external quality audits of PLHA services
	3. ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS
DISCUSSION
CONCLUSIONS
APPENDIX 1: TERMS OF REFERENCE
	REVIEW OF HIV POSITIVE SERVICE COVERAGE IN NEW ZEALAND
APPENDIX 2: KEY ISSUES FOR ORGANISATIONS UNDER REVIEW
	1. IS THERE A CLEAR STATEMENT OF PURPOSE FOR THE SERVICE AND, IF SO, HOW WAS THAT DETERMINED?
	2. ARE THE AIMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE SERVICE CONSONANT WITH APPLICABLE MINISTRY OF HEALTH POLICIES?
	3. HOW IS THE SERVICE REGULATED INTERNALLY?
	4. IS THE SERVICE STRUCTURALLY EQUIPPED TO MEET THE EXPRESSED NEEDS OF PEOPLE WHO ARE HIV POSITIVE?
	5. BY WHAT CRITERIA ARE NEEDS OF PEOPLE WITH HIV PRIORITISED?
	6. WHAT MAKES THE SERVICE EFFECTIVE AND RELEVANT FOR HIV POSITIVE PEOPLE?
	7. WHAT OBSTACLES – IF ANY – EXIST FOR POTENTIAL SERVICE USERS?
	8. HOW IS THE SERVICE WORKING ON AN ADMINISTRATIVE LEVEL?
	9. HOW IS IMPACT, EFFECTIVENESS AND VALUE ASSESSED, AND WHAT HAVE THOSE ASSESSMENTS INDICATED TO DATE?
	10. ARE THERE ANY GAPS IN SERVICE COVERAGE THAT NEED FUTURE INVESTMENT?
	11. ARE THERE PLANS FOR SERVICE DEVELOPMENT OR EVOLUTION?
APPENDIX 3: CONTRIBUTORS
APPENDIX 4: DOCUMENTATION REVIEWED
APPENDIX 5: HIV NGO WEBSITE DATA
APPENDIX 6: HIV NGO SERVICE REVIEW SELF-REPORTED DATA
	A. NEW ZEALAND AIDS FOUNDATION
	B. BODY POSITIVE INC.
	C. INA FOUNDATION CHARITABLE TRUST
	D. POSITIVE WOMEN INC.
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

REVIEW OF SERVICES FOR 

PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV 

IN NEW ZEALAND 

DAVID MILLER 

A report commissioned by the 

Ministry of Health

Page 2

Published in November 2010 by the 
Ministry of Health 

PO Box 5013, Wellington 6145, New Zealand 

ISBN 978‐0‐478‐37406‐3 (online) 
HP 5267 

 

This document is available on the Ministry of Health’s website: 
http://www.moh.govt.nz

Page 42

supporting engagement with appropriate health and social services.  BP reported identifying as many 
PLHA ‘on‐site’ as NZAF has done nationally.  It sees its accompanying/facilitative role for those found 
to be HIV positive  through  its own channels  to be a crucial one –  indeed, the spectrum of support 
services BP offers directly matches the needs that PLHA themselves express. 
 
BP is a national service, but has a physical base only in Auckland.  Its main national initiatives are the 
dissemination  of  information,  the  annual  HIV+ Men’s  Retreat,  the  HIV  Treatment  Update  (a  day 
seminar)  and  its  national  0800  helpline.    There were  no  funds  available  for  the  establishment  of 
branches elsewhere in New Zealand at the time of this review. 
 
As  a  relatively  small NGO with a  very  limited budget, BP  reports being  ‘consumed with  individual 
issues –  it  is difficult to take a step back to policy  level’.   Lack of resources  impacts social work and 
counselling in particular. 
 
All BP’s activities and services are subject to internal evaluation and, in the case of the social worker 
currently  employed,  external  professional  supervision.    Counsellors’  protocols  are  peer‐reviewed 
annually.  All clinics and events offer evaluation forms. 
 

Gaps 

BP expressed the need for renewed support for the following: 

1.  outreach clinics for sex workers, immigration overstayers, Māori and others with HIV who will 
not engage with ID or SH, for whatever reason 

2.  treatment and funding support for treatment of lipodystrophy using Aquamid – BP report 200 
of its members who need treatment (78 have been treated to date). 

 

E.  INA HIV/AIDS FOUNDATION CHARITABLE TRUST (www.ina.maori.nz) 

INA was incorporated as a charitable trust in 2008, as a reaction to what the organisers saw as an lack 
of engagement of the NZAF with Māori men and women affected by HIV/AIDS.   Based  in Tirau, INA 
outlines its purpose in this way (INA 2009): 

...  to improve the quality of life for people living with HIV/AIDS Māori, indigenous and South 
Pacific and the quality of information about HIV/AIDS to the Māori, indigenous and South 
Pacific communities in Aotearoa.  In particular, the [INA] Trust will: 

1.  ...  establish programmes and prevention and intervention strategies specific to Māori, 
indigenous and South Pacific people; 

2.  ...  establish effective support services for Māori, indigenous and South Pacific people living 
with HIV/AIDS, with culturally specific, culturally designed and sensitive programmes/ 
projects. 

 
INA  is  still  in  its development phase.   There  is one  staff member paid on a part‐time basis  (but  in 
practical  terms  working  full‐time)  and  a  board  that meets  twice  annually  (and more  frequently 
through Skype and  the  telephone).   Experienced colleagues, volunteers and board members make 
themselves available when required by service‐users.  INA’s capacity to develop has been dictated by 
available public funding and donations –  lack of funding for national development remains  its main 
operational obstacle.  To date, INA has secured three grants totalling $75,000 to fund its first years of 
operations, and has recently developed strategic performance indicators and operational documents 
(including a comprehensive business plan). 
 

34  REVIEW OF SERVICES FOR PLHA 

http://www.ina.maori.nz/

Page 43

Despite  INA’s development  constraints,  it has already established a national presence, obtaining a 
place at the table at national forums and representation at national and international meetings.  In its 
2008–2009 Annual Report, INA reports having participated  in the following consultation groups and 
conferences: 

 Indigenous HIV/AIDS pre‐Conference 2006 

 International AIDS Conference 2006 

 Indigenous HIV/AIDS pre‐Conference 2008 

 International AIDS Conference 2008 

 International Indigenous HIV/AIDS Working Group 

 International Indigenous HIV/AIDS dialogue advisory group to UNAIDS and Health Canada 

 International Collaborative  Indigenous Health Research Partnership advisory group Ngā Pae o te 
Māramatanga 

 Pacific Alliance of NGOs and AIDS Ambassadors 

 Healthcare Aotearoa 

 National HIV/AIDS Forum 

 Behavioural Blood Donor Review 

 various research projects. 
 
The Foundation has also been on the advisory committee of the NGO committee on the International 
Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. 
 
INA  hosted  a  training  conference  in  2009  –  the  first HIV  Positive Māori,  Indigenous  and  Pasifika 
Conference, which attracted 30 PLHA and whānau – and reported delivering HIV awareness wānanga 
to over 2000 whānau, hapū and iwi on 15 marae in the North Island in 2008–2009.  It reports training 
19 Māori PLHA  as  volunteers and providing  support  for over 80 PLHA and  their whānau over  the 
same  time  period.    INA  has  worked  to  raise  awareness  through  participation  in  documentaries, 
television and radio interviews and magazine and newspaper publications. 
 
A core tenet of INA is its aim to change the prevention and support focus from ‘those at risk’ to ‘the 
community’.  In particular, it notes (INA 2009): 

...  the trend [in demographics of HIV/AIDS] is leaning towards a disproportionally higher rate 
of [HIV] infection [among indigenous populations than among] non‐Indigenous people.  The 
socio‐economic cultural factors place these populations at increased risk of HIV/AIDS infection. 

 
Accordingly, INA asserts the need for Māori and Pacific Island (MPI)‐focussed services which MPI will 
relate to and attend, for MPI‐focussed literature and,  in particular, for a sustained approach to MPI 
that is whānau‐based.  The contention of INA is that as long as services are perceived as being ‘gay’, 
‘white’ and  ‘in Auckland’, most MPI will  remain un‐engaged.   With STI  rates among MPI  currently 
causing serious concern, and with ‘stigma keeping Māori away from health services’, the INA asserts 
that the need for developing specific approaches for MPI is stronger than ever. 
 
One key  issue when considering the relevance and  impact of various HIV services in New Zealand is 
whether  a  ‘by Māori  for Māori’  approach  to HIV will  yield  greater  results  than  the  status quo of 
determinedly bi‐cultural services staffed with essentially non‐Māori‐speaking staff. 
 
INA  state  that NZAF and other  community‐based  services  ‘do not engage gay/bisexual Māori men 
and women, because the outreach and education programmes employed are not based on whanau’.  
The  INA approach  is a focus on Māori‐speaking kaumātua.   Emphasising the purpose of whakapapa 
protection  from HIV  and  STIs,  they  assert, will  foster whānau/community  solidarity  (including  the 

  REVIEW OF SERVICES FOR PLHA  35

Page 83

REVIEW OF SERVICES FOR PLHA  75 

Inquiry  Response 

7.  What obstacles – if any – 
exist for potential service 
users? 

 Times, geography, 
culture, information, 
language, ideology 

 Not enough staff resulting in members not always able to get hold of someone when 
calling the office (currently looking to employ a member support and administration 
assistant).  A social worker would be ideal. 

 Not able to offer as wide a range of services as needed and not always able to assist 
as don’t have the staffing or expertise but do. 

 Don’t promote drop‐in as staff too busy. 

 Only one office in Auckland, insufficient support for members in other regions. 

 Voluntary membership.  Often scary for women to make that initial call. 

 Service not widely known / service not always recommended (by GP’s ID specialist). 

 Perception [that PWI is] part of NZAF. 

 Not having own office or at least own entrance into office.  Women not always 
comfortable having to walk through BP House ... can be a bit intimidating and not 
‘woman/family’ friendly. 

 Support networks not social norm for some migrant communities.  Need to increase 
ways of reaching these communities. 

 Migrant communities fearful of stigma and meeting others from their community 
who may also be members.  Don’t trust each other to maintain confidentiality.  
Migrants prefer/need practical help ... i.e., lift to hospital, food, baby milk formula, 
etc. 

 Some people don’t like to be part of a peer support network as a result of their own 
perceptions and fears of being associated with such an organisation (peer support is 
also not for everyone). 

8.  How is the service working 
on an administrative level? 

 Administrative capacity 
(staff numbers) 

 Administrative needs 

 Administrative 
strengths and 
weaknesses – how 
burdens affect outputs 

 Under‐resourced both from a personnel and funding perspective. 

 Systems and procedures derive from policies ... policy manual and procedures 
manual ... 

 Systems/procedures/policies not up to date, i.e., accounting and member 
registration systems outdated (currently being updated) and lack regular review of 
policies/procedures. 

 Lack capacity to engage in monitoring and evaluation. 

 Shortage of skills (accounts, strategy). 

 Systems fall behind, unable to offer the variety of services members need. 

 Need to increase networking/collaboration with other networks, unable to do as 
under‐resourced. 

9.  How is impact, 
effectiveness and value 
assessed, and what have 
those assessments 
indicated to date? 

 Criteria employed 

 Frequency and modes 
of assessments 

 Evidence of data for 
policy 

 While some evaluations are undertaken, overall this is an area we need to increase 
our focus. 

 Research (Bruning 2009) identified women feel unheard, marginalised and that there 
is a lack of support.  However not convinced that is what they truly mean as there are 
a number of support networks ... PW, BP, INA, APP, NZAF ... the real issue as was 
identified in research was that women feel isolated and unrecognised/unaccepted 
living in an environment where the focus on HIV continues to remain on MSM, and 
women continue to feel invisible. 

 Members would like more services, i.e. workshops for youth, networking for families 
with children living with HIV, Couples Seminar, Hetro Male Retreat/Seminar, Greater 
advocacy for women (family rights). 

10. Are there any gaps in 
service coverage that need 
future investment? 

 We need to look for ways to increase reach to Asian and Pacific Island women. 

 Focused support network for Hetro men living with HIV. 

 Sexual and reproductive health and HIV education in schools for both prevention and 
reduction of stigma which would assist PLHIV.

Page 84

76  REVIEW OF SERVICES FOR PLHA 

Inquiry  Response 

11. Are there plans for service 
development or evolution?  
YES. 

 About to employ member support and administration assistant. 

 Positive Women Inc. would like to have their own ‘women and family’ friendly space 
as we currently share space with Body Positive which is not a conducive environment 
to encourage drop in for women and families. 

 Looking to further utilise volunteers (once have more staff). 

 Looking to increase collaboration and partnerships with other networks working in 
similar sector. 

 Would like to have staffed outreach offices in Hamilton, Wellington and Christchurch.

 Youth Road Show, destigmatisation project for WAD 2010 (community poster 
exhibition).

Similer Documents