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TitleRepresenting Segregation: Toward an Aesthetics of Living Jim Crow, and Other Forms of Racial
Author
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages299
Table of Contents
                            Representing Segregation
Contents
Illustrations
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: To Lie, Steal, and Dissemble:The Cultural Work of the Literature of Segregation
In the Crowd: Artist’s Statement
Section I. The Aesthetic Challenges of Jim Crow Politics
	American Graffiti: The Social Life of Segregation Signs
	Smacked Upside the Head—Again
Section II. Imagining and Subverting Jim Crowin Charles Chesnutt’s Segregation Fiction
	Wedded to the Color Line: Charles Chesnutt’s Stories of Segregation
	Charles Chesnutt’s“The Dumb Witness” and the Culture of Segregation
	“Those that do violence must expect to suffer”: Disrupting Segregationist Fictions of Safety in Charles W. Chesnutt’s The Marrow of Tradition
Section III. Inside Jim Crow and His Doubles
	White Islands of Safety and Engulfing Blackness: Remapping Segregation in Angelina Weld Grimké’s “Blackness” and “Goldie”
	“Somewhat Like War”: The Aesthetics of Segregation, Black Liberation,and A Raisin in the Sun
	Housing the Black Body: Value, Domestic Space, and Segregation Narratives
	Diseased Properties and Broken Homes in Ann Petry’s The Street
Section IV. Exporting Jim Crow
	Embodying Segregation
	Black Is a Region: Segregation and American Literary Regionalism in Richard Wright’s The Color Curtain
	“¿Qué Dice?” Latin America and the Transnational inJames Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man and Along This Way
Section V. Jim Crow’s Legacy
	In Possession of Space: Abolitionist Memory and Spatial Transformation in Civil Rights Literature and Photography
	Into a Burning House: Representing Segregation’s Death
Afterword
Contributors
Index
	A
	B
	C
	D
	E
	F
	G
	H
	I
	J
	K
	L
	M
	N
	O
	P
	R
	S
	T
	U
	V
	W
	Y
	Z
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Edited by
Brian Norman and

Piper Kendrix Williams

Toward an Aesthetics of Living Jim Crow,
and Other Forms of Racial Division

Representing Segregation

Page 298

yanulada
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Page 299

SUNY
P R E S S

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES / LITERATURE

As a touchstone issue in American history, segregation has had an
immeasurable impact on the lives of most ethnic groups in the United
States. Primarily associated with the Jim Crow South and the court cases
Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), seg-
regation comprises a diverse set of cultural practices, ethnic experiences,
historical conditions, political ideologies, municipal planning schemes,
and de facto social systems. Representing Segregation traces the effects
of these practices on the literary imagination and proposes a distinct lit-
erary tradition of representing segregation. Contributors engage a cross
section of writers, literary movements, segregation practices, and related
experiences of racial division in order to demonstrate the richness and
scope of responses to segregation in the late nineteenth and twentieth
centuries. By taking up the cultural expression of the Jim Crow period and
its legacies, this collection reorients literary analysis of an important body
of African American literature in productive new directions.

“This book deals with more than just aesthetics; it also looks at the
very nature of literary and theoretical representations of segregation.”

— Kathaleen E. Amende, Alabama State University

BRIAN NORMAN is Assistant Professor of African American
and American Literature at Loyola University Maryland. He is the author
of The American Protest Essay and National Belonging: Addressing
Division, also published by SUNY Press. PIPER KENDRIX WILLIAMS
is Assistant Professor of African American Studies and English at the
College of New Jersey.

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