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TitleReport . . . 1946
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Table of Contents
                            COVER PAGE
[Book Plate: Colonel Howard S. Levie Collection]
TITLE PAGE
CONTENTS
FOREWORD
LIST OF DELEGATES
LIST OF DOCUMENTS SUBMITTED TO THE PRELIMINARY CONFERENCE OF NATIONAL RED CROSS SOCIETIES
COMPOSITION OF THE BUREAU AND OF THE COMMISSIONS
PART I - REVISION OF THE GENEVA CONVENTION OF JULY 27, 1929, FOR THE RELIEF OF THE WOUNDED AND SICK IN ARMIES IN THE FIELD, AND OF RELATED TREATY PROVISIONS
	I - GENEVA CONVENTION
		1. Introduction
		2. Application of the Convention to all cases of Armed Conflict
		3. Extension of the Convention to cover Civilian Sick and Wounded
			Chapter I - Wounded and Sick
			Chapter II - Medical Units and Establishments
			Chapter III - Personnel
			Chapter IV - Buildings and Material
			Chapter V - Medical Transport
			Chapter VI - The Distinctive Emblem
			Chapter VII - Application and Execution of the Convention
			Chapter VIII - Suppression of Abuses and Infractions
	II - CONVENTION FOR THE ADAPTATION TO MARITIME WARFARE OF THE GENEVA CONVENTION
		Chapter I - Wounded, Sick or Shipwrecked Persons
		Chapter II - Hospital-Ships
		Chapter III - Personnel
		Chapter V - Hospital Transports
		Chapter VI - Distinctive Emblem
	III - PROTECTION OF CIVILIAN HOSPITALS
	IV - HOSPITAL LOCALITIES AND ZONES
	V - AMALGAMATION OF THE ABOVE TREATY STIPULATIONS
PART II - REVISION OF THE CONVENTION SIGNED AT GENEVA ON JULY 27, 1929, RELATIVE TO THE TREATMENT OF PRISONERS OF WAR
	A) GENERAL REMARKS
		1. Introduction
		2. Field of Application of the Convention
		3. Possible mention in the Convention of National Red Cross Societies and of the International Committee of the Red Cross . . .
		4. Mention of the Role of the Delegates of the International Committee
		5. Official Prisoner of War Information Bureaux
		6. Unification of Methods of communicating Information about Prisoners of War
		7. Capture Cards forwarded to the Central Prisoner of War Agency
		8. Prisoner of War Mail
		9. Internment in Neutral Countries
	B) QUESTIONS OF RELIEF
		1. Transit and Distribution of individually adressed Parcels
		2. Transit and Issue of Collective Relief Supplies
		3. Possible fixing of Minimum and Maximum Relief Quantities
		4. Forwarding of Uniforms by the Home Country
		5. Ownership of Parcels
		6. Recognition of the Right of Delegates to check up Stocks and Issues, and to make Purchases for Prisoners
		7. Franchise (Exemption from Charges) and Priority for Relief Transport
		8. Extension of Franchise (Exemption from Charges) to all Modes of Transport . .
		9. Red Cross Ships; Land and Air Transport Facilities for Relief Consignments
PART III - SITUATION AND PROTECTION OF CIVILIANS
	1. Introduction
	2. Status of Enemy Aliens in Belligerent Territory
	3. Situation of Civilian Populations in Enemy-Occupied Territory
	4. Relief to Civilian Internees
	5. Civilian Workers
	6. Relief to Non-Interned Civilians
	7. Civilian Messages (Postal Message Scheme)
	8. Protection of Children in Time of War
	9. Protection of the Civilian Population against Bombardments
	10. Stateless Persons and Refugees
PART IV - SPECIFIC RED CROSS PROBLEMS
	I - NATIONAL SOCIETIES IN TIME OF WAR
		1. Field of Action of National Societies
		2. Activities of National Societies in behalf of Enemy Prisoners of War detained in their Territory
		3. Independence of National Societies with regard to the Public Authorities
	II - CO-OPERATION OF NATIONAL SOCIETIES IN TIME OF WAR
		1. Relations between National Societies of Enemy Countries
		2. Possibility for Neutral National Societies to facilitate relations between the Red Cross Societies of Belligerent Countries
		3. Red Cross Branches remaining on territory occupied by the Enemy
		4. Relief Activities by Neutral National Societies in behalf of Red Cross Societies of Belligerent States
		5. Coordination of Relief Activities of Neutral Red Cross Societies in behalf of Belligerents
	III - ROLE OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE AND ITS FINANCES
		1. Role of the International Committee of the Red Cross
		2. Financial Resources of the International Committee of the Red Cross
	IV - FOUNDATIONS OF THE RED CROSS IN INTERNATIONAL LAW
	V - RELATIONS OF NATIONAL SOCIETIES WITH THE INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS
		1. Facilities to be granted to the Red Cross
		2. Activities of the International Committee in various Countries
		3. Relations between the International Committee of the Red Cross and National Red Cross Societies in occupied Countries
		4. Delegations of the International Committee abroad, and Delegations of National Societies to the Committee
	VI - CONSTITUTION AND RECOGNITION OF NATIONAL RED CROSS SOCIETIES
		1. Policy adopted by the International Committee during the Second World War
		2. Conditions of Recognition of National Red Cross Societies
	VII - PROTESTS OF NATIONAL RED CROSS SOCIETIES AGAINST ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE HUMANITARIAN CONVENTIONS
	VIII - THE RED CROSS AND NEW METHODS OF WARFARE
	IX - PREPARATION OF THE SEVENTEENTH INTERNATIONAL RED CROSS CONFERENCE
	X - SPECIAL COMMISSION FOR THE STUDY OF NEW DRAFT CONVENTIONS
	XI - PROPOSAL OF THE CZECHOSLOVAK RED CROSS CONCERNING THE DISSOLUTION OF NATIONAL SOCIETIES BY AN OCCUPYING POWER
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

I NTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE O F TH E RE D CROSS


REPORT

on the Work. of the Preliminary Conference

of National Red Cross Societies for the

study of the Conventions and of various


Problems relative to the Red Cross


G eneva, July 26-August 3, 1946

+

GENEVA
1947

Serie I. N° 3 a .

U·11 1~111~ J~I~ Irll~~II~ira~
006764

Page 2

Colonel Howard S. Levie


Collection



The Judge Advocate General's


Legal Center and School



United States Army


Charlottesville, Virginia

Page 75

Experts had prepared a Draft in which the text of the Tenth
Hague Convention was adapted as closely as possible to that of
the Geneva Convention, to facilitate amalgamation, in case this
should be decided upon. A brief survey shows that, out of the
twenty-nine Articles composing the Draft Revised Maritime
Convention, fourteen could be wholly incorporated into the
Geneva Convention, with no important change to the latter,
whilst four could be embodied providing certain additions were
made to the text of the Geneva Convention. On the other hand,
eleven articles which deal with the special circumstances of
naval warfare and the use of hospital-ships would have to
appear in the Geneva Convention as new stipulations.

The Conference, as has been seen, considered that the ad-
vantages of amalgamation and of a single Convention out-
weighed the drawbacks.

Page 76

PART II

REVISION OF THE CONVENTION SIGNED AT GENEVA ON �
JULY 27, 1929, RELATIVE TO THE TREATMENT OF �

PRISONERS OF WAR �

A) General Remarks

1. INTRODUCTION

(The Commission proposes that future Conventions should
comprise a General Part, guaranteeing in all circumstances the
essential rights of the individual, as well as the respect of the
human dignity of all persons who, for any reason whatever, are
in the hands of the enemy or of a Power whose authority they do
not recognize. These rights are intangible and recognized to all,
without distinction of opinion race, religion, or nationality. The
rules contained in this General Part could thus be invoked, even

;- by individuals, in cases where the more detailed provisions of the
Conv~~ti~ns should prove ineffectual.

Fhe Commission also considers that the question of control and
of sanctions in the case of violation of treaty stipulations is of
particular importance, and that it should be most thoroughly
studied.

The Commission is further of opinion that it would be desirable
to extend the principle embodied in Art. 83, Sec. 3 of the present
Convention, so that belligerents must authorize, at the outset of
hostilities, meetings of representatives of the various administra­
tive authorities responsible for Prisoners of WarJ

The Commission set up by the Conference to study the I929
Convention first considered whether the latter adequately
fulfilled its purpose during the recent War. Opinions on the
subject were divided, some delegations making reservations as
to its practical value, while the majority considered that the
Convention, in spite of imperfections, had checked abuses and

I

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Page 150

continue to undertake the preparatory work and to draw up the
preliminary drafts as it has done successfully for the past
eighty-four years. This thankless task requires a sustained
effort of several years and the whole-time assistance of specia-
lists. The International Committee would submit its drafts to
the proposed special Commission contemplated, before present-
ing them to the International Red Cross Conference. The
Committee, however, obviously reserved its entire liberty to
express its views at the International Conference, should they
differ from those of the Special Commission, and to submit its
own drafts to the Conference.

After a debate, the decision quoted above was passed by
a majority vote.

XI. Proposal of the Czechoslovak Red Cross
concerning the dissolution of National Societies

by an Occupying Power

Following a proposal by the Czechoslovak Red Cross, the Confer-
ence adopts the following resolution:

"In case of dissolution or modification in the executive of a
National Red Cross Society recognized by the International
Committee of the Red Cross, the International Red Cross shall
be previously notified and informed of the reasons leading to this
step. No dissolution can take effect except after final decision by the
International Red Cross."

The initial proposal of the Czechoslovak Red Cross covered
only dissolution of a National Red Cross Society by an Occupy-
ing Power. It was warmly supported by several Delegations,
and in particular by the delegate of the Italian Red Cross.
During the war this Society was in a very similar situation to
that of Czechoslovakia. .The delegate pointed out that besides
the case of dissolution, it would be advisable to provide for the
possibility that the Occupying Power might make changes in
the executive of the National Red Cross Society. If the dissolu-

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Page 151

tion of the Red Cross is a radical measure, the imposition of a
managing executive corresponds in practice to dissolution, by
the setting up of a puppet Society.

The Czechoslovak proposal, amended in this sense, was
endorsed unanimously by the Commission and adopted by the
Conference at the plenary session 1.

1 See above, page !IS, the Resolution adopted concerning Red
Cross Branches remaining in territory occupied by the enemy. This
Resolution is somewhat similar to that adopted on the proposal of the
Czechoslovak Red Cross.

143

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