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TitleRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY, EXERCISE BEHAVIOR, AND EXERCISE ...
LanguageEnglish
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Table of Contents
                            ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF TABLES
ABSTRACT
INTRODUCTION
	Five Factor Model
	Personality and Exercise
	Directions for Future Research
	Conclusion
	Dissertation Studies
STUDY 1: AN EXPLORATION OF PERSONALITY AND EXERCISE PREFERENCES
	Method
		Participants
		Measures
		Procedure
	Results
	Discussion
STUDY 2: PERSONALITY AND EXERCISE PREFERENCES
	Introduction
	Purposes
	Hypotheses
		Purpose 1: Development of an Exercise Preference Questionnaire
		Purpose 2: Exercise Behavior and Personality
		Purpose 3: Exercise Preferences and Personality
		Purpose 4: Exercise Behavior and Exercise Preferences
	First Purpose
		Focus Group 1
		Focus Group 2
		Focus Group 3
	Second, Third, and Fourth Purposes
		Method
			Participants
			Measures
		Procedure
		Response Rate
		Examination of Group Differences
	Data Analysis
		Preliminary Analyses
		Purpose 2: Personality and Exercise
		Purpose 3: Personality and Exercise Preferences
		Purpose 4: Exercise Behavior and Exercise Preferences
	Results
		Preliminary Analysis
		Purpose 2: Personality and Exercise
		Purpose 3: Personality and Exercise Preferences
		Purpose 4: Exercise Behavior and Exercise Preferences
	Discussion
		Purpose 1: Creation and Validation of the Exercise Preferences Questionnaire
		Purpose 2: Personality and Exercise Behavior
		Purpose 3: Personality and Exercise Preferences
		Purpose 4: Exercise Behavior and Exercise Preferences
	Limitations
	Conclusion
GENERAL DISCUSSION
	Study 1
	Study 2
		Purpose 1: Development and Preliminary Psychometric Assessment of an Exercise Preferences Questionnaire
		Purpose 2: Exercise Behavior and Personality
		Purpose 3: Exercise Preferences and Personality
		Purpose 4: Exercise Behavior and Exercise Preferences
	Limitations and Future Directions
	Study Strengths
	Conclusion
NEO-PI-R PERSONALITY QUESTIONNAIRE
LEISURE-TIME EXERCISE QUETSIONNAIRE
INFORMED CONSENT – STUDY 1
FOCUS GROUP EXECISE PREFERENCES QUESTIONNAIRE
RESPONSES TO EXERCISE PREFERENCES QUESTIONNAIRE - FOCUS GROUP 1
REVISED PREFERENCES TO EXERCISE QUESTIONNAIRE
RESPONSES TO EXERCISE PREFERENCES QUESTIONNAIRE –
REVISED EXERCISE PREFENCES QUESTIONNAIRE 2
RESPONSES TO EXERCISE PREFERENCES QUESTIONNAIRE –
FINAL EXERCISE PREFERENCES QUESTIONNAIRE
DEMOGRAPHICS QUESTIONNAIRE
INFORMED CONSENT – STUDY 2
LIST OF REFERENCES
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH
                        
Document Text Contents
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Table 3.13. Frequency Chart for the Dichotomous Preference of Exercise Duration
Cardiovascular

N = 217
Resistance Training

N = 116
Less than 20 minutes 4 25

20-40 minutes 108 65

40-60 minutes 74 26

More than 60 minutes 31 116


Purpose 4: Exercise Behavior and Exercise Preferences

First, for the preferences measured on the visual analog scales, correlations

between the Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire and the EPQ revealed that exercise

intensity (r = .24, p < .01), preferred number of days per week of exercise (r = .36, p <

.01), and exercise schedule (r = -.34, p < .01) were significantly correlated with exercise

behavior (see Table 3.14).

Second, a multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine which exercise

preferences (independent variables) predicted exercise behavior (dependent variable).

Results revealed that exercise preferences explain 20% of the variance in exercise

behavior [F(3, 325) = 26.20, p < .01] with only preferred number of days per week (β =

.27, p < .01) and scheduled exercise (β = −.25, p < .01) identified as significant

predictors.

Third, correlations were computed between exercise behavior and the preferences

differentiating between cardiovascular exercise and resistance training (see Table 3.15).

For cardiovascular exercise, a significant correlation was revealed for exercise location (r

= .13, p = .04) and listening to music (r = .15, p = .02). No correlations were significant

for resistance training.

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Table 3.14. Pearson Correlations Between Exercise Behavior and Exercise Preferences

Variable 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1. Exercise -- .24** -.04 .05 -.08 .36** -.34**

2. Intensity -- .09 -.05 .05 .37** -.29**

3. Rhythm -- .23** .04 -.07 -.01

4. Mode -- .04 .00 -.07

5. Time of day -- -.04 .08

6. Days per week -- -.30**

7. Scheduled --

Note. * p < .05; ** p < .01


Table 3.15. Pearson Correlations between Exercise Total and the Preferences of Location,

Music, and Instruction
Cardiovascular Resistance Training

Location .13* -.10

Music .15* .13

Instruction -.09 -.07

Note. * p < .05; ** p < .01


Fourth, for the dichotomous exercise preferences, one-way ANOVA’s were

computed for total Leisure-Time Exercise (dependent variable) and the exercise

preference (independent variable). During cardiovascular exercise, exercise duration was

significant [F(3, 210) = 6.56, p < .01] (see Table 3.16). More specifically, a bonferroni

post hoc test revealed that for cardiovascular exercise, it was found that 40-60 minutes

and 60 or more minutes per exercise session was significantly different from 20-40

minutes. See tables 3.17 and 3.18 for the results for exercise location and exercise

company which were not significant.

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