Download Quality Cancer Data Saves Lives PDF

TitleQuality Cancer Data Saves Lives
LanguageEnglish
File Size3.4 MB
Total Pages119
Table of Contents
                            Slide 1 - Quality Cancer Data Saves Lives
Slide 2 - 16 Million Americans
Slide 3 - New Cases of Cancer in 2004
Slide 4 - Cancer in the News
Slide 5 - Survival Rate for all Cancers
Slide 6 - Cancer Registries
Slide 7 - Age- Adjusted Invasive Cancer Incidence Rates
Slide 8 - Goal
Slide 9 - Result (1)
Slide 10 - Result (2)
Slide 11 - Result (3)
Slide 12 - 
Cancer Registries Collect a Wide Range of Information
Slide 13 - Cancer- related Information
Slide 14 - Different Kinds of Cancer Registries
Slide 15 - Detailed Cancer Information
Slide 16 - Hospital Cancer Registry
Slide 17 - State Cancer Registry
Slide 18 - National Cancer Data Base
Slide 19 - Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Program (1)
Slide 20 - Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Program (2)
Slide 21 - National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
Slide 22 - National Program of Cancer Registries
Slide 23 - NPCR States
Slide 24 - NPCR is Expanding Efforts (1)
Slide 25 - NPCR is Expanding Efforts (2)
Slide 26 - NPCR is Expanding Efforts (3)
Slide 27 - NPCR is Expanding Efforts (4)
Slide 28 - CDC: National Standards
Slide 29 - NPCR Provides National Leadership to Cancer Registries
Slide 30 - NPCR and SEER Registries Work Collaboratively
Slide 31 - International Association of Cancer Registries
Slide 32 - How Registries Collect Cancer Data
Slide 33 - Uniform Data Collection
Slide 34 - Standard Setting Organizations
Slide 35 - Patient Information
Slide 36 - Abstracting
Slide 37 - Data Sources
Slide 38 - Embracing Technology
Slide 39 - A National Framework
Slide 40 - History of Cancer Information
Slide 41 - Earliest Known Descriptions of Cancer
Slide 42 - 1629 to 1839
Slide 43 - 1923 First U.S. Cancer Registry Launched
Slide 44 - 1932 to 1956
Slide 45 - 1971 70 1974
Slide 46 - 1974 to 1983
Slide 47 - 1990 NAACCR Established
Slide 48 - 1992 to 1996
Slide 49 - The Flow of Cancer Information: A Case Study
Slide 50 - Diagnosis to Treatment (1)
Slide 51 - Diagnosis to Treatment (2)
Slide 52 - Diagnosis to Treatment (3)
Slide 53 - Diagnosis to Treatment (4)
Slide 54 - Diagnosis to Treatment (5)
Slide 55 - Diagnosis to Treatment (6)
Slide 56 - Cancer Information is Used to Improve Prevention, Research, and Care
Slide 57 - Cancer Information is Used in Thousands of Ways
Slide 58 - Evaluate Efficacy of Treatment Modalities
Slide 59 - Cancer Surveillance
Slide 60 - Report Cancer Incidence as Required
Slide 61 - Trends in Five- Year Relative Survival Rates
Slide 62 - Cancer Prevention Activities
Slide 63 - Analyze Referral Patterns
Slide 64 - Allocate Resources
Slide 65 - Develop Educational Programs
Slide 66 - Body of Knowledge
Slide 67 - Kentucky
Slide 68 - Arizona
Slide 69 - Minnesota
Slide 70 - Kansas
Slide 71 - New York
Slide 72 - Accuracy and Privacy
Slide 73 - Inaccurate Data
Slide 74 - National Data Only as Good as State and Local Data
Slide 75 - Ensuring Accuracy is a Team Effort
Slide 76 - Privacy Concerns are Paramount
Slide 77 - Cancer Registrars: A Challenging Career
Slide 78 - High Quality Data Results from Trained Specialists
Slide 79 - Cancer Registrars Record, Find and Interpret Data
Slide 80 - Cancer Registrar Must Have Comprehensive Knowledge
Slide 81 - Education
Slide 82 - Health Care Team
Slide 83 - Beyond Data Collection (1)
Slide 84 - Beyond Data Collection (2)
Slide 85 - Beyond Data Collection (3)
Slide 86 - Key Players in Ensuring Quality Health Care (1)
Slide 87 - Key Players in Ensuring Quality Health Care (2)
Slide 88 - How Does One Become a Cancer Registrar?
Slide 89 - Formal Education Programs
Slide 90 - Higher Education
Slide 91 - NCRA's Requirements for Approval
Slide 92 - Other Educational Opportunities
Slide 93 - Certification of Cancer Registrars
Slide 94 - Certification Ensures Quality Results
Slide 95 - Additional Benefits: Certification
Slide 96 - CTR Credential
Slide 97 - Eligibility Requirements for Certification
Slide 98 - CTR Requirements (1)
Slide 99 - CTR Requirements (2)
Slide 100 - CTR Examination Content (1)
Slide 101 - CTR Examination Content (2)
Slide 102 - NCRA's Certification Examination
Slide 103 - NCRA's Council on Certification's Mission
Slide 104 - Continuing Education
Slide 105 - NCRA: Resources for Registrars
Slide 106 - NCRA Represents Cancer Registry Professionals and CTRs
Slide 107 - NCRA Mission Statement (1)
Slide 108 - NCRA Vision Statement (2)
Slide 109 - NCRA Core Values
Slide 110 - What NCRA Offers (1)
Slide 111 - What NCRA Offers (2)
Slide 112 - What NCRA Offers (3)
Slide 113 - Cancer Registry Is a Dynamic Profession (1)
Slide 114 - Cancer Registry Is a Dynamic Profession (2)
Slide 115 - Cancer Registry Is a Dynamic Profession (3)
Slide 116 - Cancer Registry Is a Dynamic Profession (4)
Slide 117 - Cancer Registry Careers are Rewarding
Slide 118 - Cancer Registrars Have Many Career Opportunities
Slide 119 - You and Cancer Registries
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

1/3/2010

1

Quality Quality
Cancer Data Cancer Data
Saves LivesSaves Lives
The Vital Role of Cancer Registrars
in the Fight against Cancer

Page 2

1/3/2010

2

16 Million

Between 1990 and 2004 more than 16 million Americans were diagnosed with
cancer.

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59

Provide
cancer
burden
information
for cancer
surveillance

Cancer incidence data also provides cancer burden information for cancer
surveillance and is used for comprehensive cancer control planning. Cancer data
alerts public health officials to trends within communities and potentially dangerous
environmental or workplace conditions.

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60

Report cancer
incidence as

required by
state and

federal laws

Cancer data are used to report cancer incidence as required by state and federal
laws.

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118

Cancer Registrars Have Many
Career Opportunities

Hospitals and Health Care
Facilities
Software Vendors
Government Agencies
Pharmaceutical Companies
Outsourcing or Contract
services

Cancer Registrars have opportunities to pursue other exciting career paths, including
working in hospital administration, software sales and support, and program
management in government or the private sector. Many Cancer Registrars also
enter the consulting fields. Many of these careers offer flexible working
arrangements, including telecommuting, and many offer travel opportunities.

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119

You and
Cancer Registries:

A Smart Choice
for a Bright Future

Cancer registrars are the intelligence officers on the front lines, collecting critical
information that is used to develop the battle plan and to deliver the necessary
troops to the right location at the right time in order to combat the enemy— cancer.
As active members of the cancer team, registrars prepare and present data for cancer
conferences, grand rounds, tumor boards, and planning meetings. Cancer registrars
are the lifeblood of cancer registries and serve as the backbone of local, state, and
national cancer surveillance and cancer control programs. If you want to make a
difference in the fight against cancer, this may be the career path for you!

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