Download QA The Invisible Man Chapter 21-28 PDF

TitleQA The Invisible Man Chapter 21-28
TagsThe Invisible Man Science (General)
File Size47.6 KB
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Page 1

CHAPTER 21

Q1. What are the drawbacks of being invisible as discovered by Griffin?

Ans. Griffin continues to explain his experiences with invisibility. He soon
discovered that being invisible had as many drawbacks as advantages. People
ran into him and stepped on him. He had to be continually on guard as to the
movements and positions of others in order to avoid accidental contact. To make
matters worse, although people could not see him, dogs could detect him with
their keen sense of smell. As he had to remain naked, he was soon
uncomfortable. Also, he could not eat, as food was visible until it was fully
assimilated into his system.

At one point, he had run up the steps of a house in order to avoid a unit of a
marching Salvation Army band. While he waited, two youngsters spotted the
prints of his bare feet in the mud. Soon a crowd of people had gathered to look at
the “ghost prints.” He leapt over the railing and ran through a bunch of back
roads to avoid the press. Fortunately for him, his escape at that time was aided
with the distraction created by conflagration engulfing his former dwelling.

Q2. The reckless actions and inconsiderate thought-process of Griffin
brought his own nemesis. Comment.

Ans. This is true that it’s a story about a person who doesn't fit in with his
surroundings. The Invisible Man is a man without family or good friends, whose
neighbours don't understand his work. He starts experimenting with the idea of
invisibility to get rid of this loneliness. Griffin’s initial error was that he became so
obsessed with a single scientific notion that he failed to take consequences into
consideration. No doubt, he was not concerned about people because he thought
that they considered him to be some kind of mutation. As an albino human, he
was already a marginalized individual who did not fit into ordinary society.
College was the perfect place for him to fulfil his desire to do something which
makes others realise his existence. However, he was so concerned about the
possibility of any one getting credit for his discovery that he failed to take
advantage of his exceptional knowledge and achievement. In order to tackle his
painful isolation from the society, he became more and more alienated.

CHAPTER 22

Q3. Describe the painful experiences of Griffin in Omniums .

Ans. With a January snowstorm blowing in to London, Griffin needed to find a
place to stay. He couldn't get into a house, so he decided to go to a shop where
he could get food shelter and clothing. He went to a giant department store
named Omniums. Griffin waited until the place closed, then he started searching
around for things he could use. He stole some food and clothes. Over by toys, he
saw some fake noses, which started him thinking about wigs and other costume
stuff that could help him pretend to be normal. He slept in the department store
and planned to leave the place in the morning before anyone came. He had
nightmares about being forced into his father's grave and buried because no one

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could see him. Griffin woke up when the workers came back the next morning,
and he almost got caught. The workers chased him around the store. They could
see him because he was wearing clothes but once again, Griffin took off his
clothes to become invisible. Since he couldn't steal clothes, Griffin had to leave
the store with nothing.

CHAPTER 23

Q4. How did finally Griffin manage to create a visible appearance for
himself?

OR

Q. Describe the events of Dury Lane costume shop.

Ans. Griffin’s problems increased daily. He had no clothes or shelter and dared
not eat. Also, he soon realized that walking through the streets of London was
going to result in an accumulation of dirt on his skin- which would make him
visible.

He made his way into a costume shop, hoping to find some clothes and dark
glasses after the proprietor had gone to bed. In the shopkeeper’s room, he had
to stand and watch the man eat his breakfast. Furthermore, the man had
exceptionally acute hearing and nearly discovered Griffin several times. When
evening came, he was finally able to explore the house and found a pile of old
clothes. In his excitement, he forgot about the noise he was making and was
nearly caught when the shopkeeper investigated the noise. Unable to see the
source, but positive someone was in the house; the proprietor went about
locking all the doors in the house and pocketing the keys. In desperation, Griffin
struck the old man on the head, then gagged and tied him with a sheet. Then he
put together a costume of old clothes, stole all the money he could find and went
out into the street.

Q5. How do you feel when Griffin tells his own story to Kemp? Does it
make you sympathize with Griffin? Or does he seem like more of a
monster when he casually talks about attacking people and stealing
from his father?

Ans. The big question here is that how we feel about Griffin. Is he a criminal mad
scientist who or a frustrated lonely person who is trying to work things out? We
know that he is without friends and family. It seems like no matter where he finds
himself, he's isolated from the larger community – he's as alone in Iping as he is
in London. Whatever may be reason; his actions can’t be justified by any
standard. His violent rage, his inconsiderate attitude, his extreme actions and his
completely selfish and cruel behaviour towards everyone in the story does not let
the reader develop any sympathy for him. He indirectly kills his father for his
personal gain; he takes advantage of foolish villagers; he is extremely vengeful
towards Marvel and does not hesitate to kill anyone who tries to foil his plan.
However lonely and discarded, he had no right to indulge in violence and crime
as he did.

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