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TitlePollution Prevention for the Printing Industry
LanguageEnglish
File Size11.2 MB
Total Pages134
Table of Contents
                            ures
Keys to Using This Guide
The U.S Domestic Printing Industry
Overview
Companies Presses and Employees
Geographic Distribution
Conclusion
Annotated Bibliography
Emerging Technologies
Annotated Bibliography
Common Pollution Prevention Practices in Printing
Major Wastestreams
How to Reduce Waste
Pre Press
Press
Inks
Cleanup
Post Press
References Used
Annotated Bibliography
Places to Look for Waste Reduction
Lit hog rap hy
Overview
Pre Press
Photo Processing
Proofs
Plates
Press
Post Press
References Used
Annotated Bibliography
Case Studies
Screen Printing
Overview
Pre Press
Press
Post Press
References Used
Annotated Bibliography
Case Studies
Flexography
Overview
Pre Press
Press
Post Press
Letterpress
References Used
Annotated Bibliography
Case Studies
Gravure
Overview
Pre Press
Press
Post Press
References Used
Case Studies
Appendix NFederal Regulations
Clean Air Act (CAA)
Clean Water Act (CWA)
Occupational Health and Safety Act
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
Superfund (CERCLA and SARA)
Appendix B/H u ma n Resou ices
States/Provinces
National and Regional Groups
Printing Associations
Appendix C/Electronic Resources
Printing Web Sites
Listservs
Videos
Appendix D/Glossary
Appendix E/Summary Sheets
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 67

US EPA “Designing Solutions for Screen
Printers.” Design for the Environment Printing
Project Factsheet. US EPA. 199.5. 2p.

US EPA, I994a “Cleaner Technologies
Substitutes Assessment: Industry.: Screen
Printing Use Cluster: Screen Reclamation
(Draft)” US EPA, Washington, DC, 1994.

Some screen printers with long production
runs and extremely small screens, such as those
used to print on medicine bottles, simply cut the
screen mesh out of the frame after completion of
the production run. By simply disposing of the
screens, printers could eliminate the high cost of
reclamation chemicals and labor time associated
with screen reclamation, as well as reduce the
risk associated with occupational and population
exposure to these chemicals. However, printers
have to dispose of more screens, some of which
may be designated as hazardous waste due to the
chemicals applied to them during imaging and
printing. Due to the different types of source
reduction involved in these two options, they are
difficult to directly compare in terms of pollution
prevention. Based on Design for the Environ-
ment ( D E ) analysis, i t is clear that screen
disposal is not a cost-effective option for a
majority of screen printing facilities. However,
printers should not view this cost estimate as a
final analysis, because the operations of any one
facility can be different from the assumptions
used in generating this analysis. Screen disposal
would be more cost-effective in circumstances
where production runs approach the useful life of
a screen and where the size of the screen is
relatively small (US EPA, 1994a).

References Used
Alaska Health Project. “Waste Reduction

Assistance Program (WRAP) On-Site Consulta-
tion Audit Report: Printing Company.” 21 p.,
19x7.

Jendnicko, R.J., Coleman, T.N., and T.M.
Thomas. “Waste Reduction Manual for Litho-
graphic and Screen Printers,” Department of
Engineering Science and Mechanics, University
of Tennessee. August 1994.

US EPA, 1994b “Work Practice Alternatives
for Screen Reclamation-Case Study 4: Screen
Printing.” Design for the Environment Printing
Project Factsheet. US EPA, 1994.4 p.

Annotated Bibliography

“Chemical Alternatives for Screen Reclama-
tion-Case Study 5: Screen Printing.” Design for
the Environment Printing Project Factsheet. US
EPA. 1994.4 p.

Factsheet compares chemical alternatives for
screen reclamation to traditional systems (in-
cludes only chemical composition of alternative,
not product name). Tests were conducted at two
facilities--includes performance, risk and cost
data.

“Designing Solutions for Screen Printers.”
Design for the Environment Printing Project
Factsheet. US EPA. 1 9 9 5 . 2 ~ .

Factsheet gives overview of D E project,
gives no information about results of study.

“Reducing the Use of Reclamation Chemi-
cals in Screen Printing: Screen Printing” Design
for the Environment Printing Project Facts hee t .
US EPA. 1993.4 p.

Very good factsheet. Case study of Romo
Incorporated gives lots of good basic ideas, some
easy and inexpensive to apply--includes cost and
waste reduction data.

“Technology Alternatives for Screen Recla-
mation-Case Study 2: Screen Printing.” Design
for the Environment Printing Project Factsheet.
US EPA. 1994.4 p.

nologies for screen reclamation--compares risk,
performance and cost to traditional methods.

Factsheet discusses three alternative tech-

US EPA. 1994a. “Cleaner Technologies
Substitutes Assessment: Industry: Screen
Printing Use Cluster: Screen Reclamation
(Draft)’’ Washington, DC: United States Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, 1994.

data. Compares alternative and traditional screen
reclamation products, technologies, and pro-
cesses in terms of environmental and human
health exposure and risk, performance and cost.
Includes general screen printing information and

Massive technical document including lots of

57

Page 68

good overall pollution prevention opportunities.
An executive summary is available.

US EPA. 1994b. “Work Practice Alterna-
tives for Screen Reclamation-Case Study 4:
Screen Printing.” Design for the Environment
Printing Project Factsheet. US EPA. 1994.4 p.

Very good factsheet lists general pollution
prevention opportunities including process
improvements and materials management/
inventory control.

“A Guide for Screen Printers.” Washington
State Department of Ecology, Environmental
Management and Pollution Prevention, 94- 137,
September 1994.

A good primary resource for the screen
printer. Has good checklists of Do’s and Don’ts
for each major wastestream.

Pollution Prevention for Printers and
Photoprocessors, Metro-Dade County Depart-
ment of Environmental Resources Management,
October 1995.

A good booklet on general pollution preven-
tion practices applicable to all types of printing
broken down by process.

Factsheets

“Removing solvent and ink from printer
shop towels and disposable wipes” MnTAP
1991,6 p.

shop towels and management of disposable
wipes, includes some vendors.

Presents options for removing solvent from

Office of Waste Reduction Fact Sheet,
Washington State Department of Ecology Nov
1988, Printing Shops, 4 p.

opportunities for all types of printers.
A listing of general pollution prevention

Center for Hazardous Materials Research
“Pollution Prevention: Strategies for the Printing
Industry,” 4 p.

Reasons to practice pollution prevention and
general tips for all types of printers.

“Waste Reduction for the Commercial
Printing Industry” California Department of
Health Sevices Toxic Substances Control Divi-

sion Alternative Technology Division, Aug 1989,

Waste reduction incentives, requirements
6 P -

and alternatives including inks and solvents.

“Waste Reduction Checklist” Office of
Waste Reduction Services, State of Michigan,
Departments of Commerce and Natural Re-
sources, Dec 1989,6 p.

opportunities for all types of printers.
Checklist of general pollution prevention

“Management of Solvents and Wipes in the
Printing Industry” SHWEC Waste Education
Series, May 1994,4 p.

methods of reducing solvent waste.
Proper management of cleanup wipes and

“Hazardous Waste Reduction Facts: General
Commercial Printers” City of Santa Monica
Department of General Services, 2 p.

General pollution prevention tips for all
types of printers.

“Pollution Prevention Opportunities in

General pollution prevention tips for all
Printing” USEPA Region 3, Oct 1990

types of printers.

“Lithographic Ink Wastes: How to Reduce,
Reuse, and Recyle Ink Waste” SHWEC Waste
Education Series, Aug 1995, 6 p.

Discusses ink management techniques
including 2 case studies and some ink recycling
services providers.

“Waste Reduction Opportunities for Print-
ers” SHWEC Waste Education Series, Aug 1994,
4 P.

Lists potential sources and types of printers’
waste and to waste and emission reduction
opportunities for printers.

58

Page 133

13, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28, 29, 31, 33, 40, 41, 44, 51, 52, 58, 62, 63,
78, 80, 81, 82, 90, 92, 93, 101, 102

source reduction 13, 24, 43, 52, 78
stencil 51, 60, 61, 62, 64
still 4, 6, 8, 15, 16, 21, 23, 31, 43, 51, 59, 60, 73, 87
substrate 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 31, 51, 52, 73, 74, 79, 87, 88, 89, 90

T

toluene 31, 41, 51, 59, 62, 90, 98, 100, 101, 102, 104, 105
towels 15, 22, 28, 29, 41, 57, 80, 103
toxicity 15, 16, 42, 92, 105

U

UV 18, '19, 20, 23, 24, 51, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 73, 80
UVcuring 24, 61, 80

V

vegetable-based inks 31

volatile organic compound 13, 20, 37, 41, 90

w

vocs 20, 22, 31, 33, 38, 41, 52, 73, 80, 89, 90, 97

waste reduction 12, 14, 18, 22, 23, 24, 25, 31, 37, 41, 52, 57, 58, 74, 75, 79, 89, 90, 91
waste segregation 14
wastestream 37, 57
water-based 19, 24, 26, 29, 31, 38, 41, 51, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 73, 74, 78, 80, 88, 90
water-borne 73

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