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TitlePolitical Sentiments and Social Movements: The Person in Politics and Culture
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LanguageEnglish
File Size2.1 MB
Total Pages429
Table of Contents
                            Series Preface
Preface
Acknowledgements
Contents
Editors and Contributors
List of Figures
Chapter 1 Introduction: The Person in Politics and Culture
	Politics, Culture, and Persons
	Political Subjectivity—Meanings and Theories
		Cultural Models in Cognitive Anthropology
		Psychodynamic Anthropology
		Social Practice Theories
	Cross-Cutting Themes in This Volume
		What Is the Role of Emotions in Politics?
		How Are Political Messages Taken up by Members of the Public? In Particular, How Do People Interact with Political Messages in Media, Including Social Media?
		What Are the Subjective Consequences of Conflicting Political Discourses?
		How Do People’s Identities Relate to Their Politics?
		What Are the Subjectivities of Political Bystanders?
		How Do People Become Politically Active?
		How Do We Explain Populist Politics?
	Conclusion: The Hazards of Person-Centered Approaches to Politics
	References
Part I Political Sentiments
Chapter 2 Engaged by the Spectacle of Protest: How Bystanders Became Invested in Occupy Wall Street
	The Occupy Movement and My Participants
	Should We Expect Bystanders to Care About Contentious Politics?
	Schemas and Personal Semantic Networks
	Interviewing for Cultural Schema and Personal Semantic Network Analysis
	Two Views of the Occupy Movement
	What Was Occupy’s Message?
	Is This What Democracy Looks Like? Cultural Schemas About Occupy’s Tactics
	Personal Semantic Networks
	The Personal, Cultural, and Social in Bystanders’ Political Sentiments
	References
Chapter 3 Progressives’ Plantation: The Tea Party’s Complex Relationship with Race
	Tea Party Components and the Formation of Figured Worlds
	Descriptions of Tea Party Racism in the Literature
	The Tea Party as a Version of Whiteness and Colorblind Racism
		Whiteness
		Colorblind Racism
		Abstract Liberalism Frame
		Cultural Racism Frame
		Naturalization of Difference
	Conclusion
	References
Chapter 4 Refiguring the Public, Political, and Personal in Current Danish Exclusionary Reasoning
	Introduction
	The Public Space Is Not What It Used to Be
	The Nation in Danger: Danish Exclusionary Reasoning
		Neonationalism
		Nationalism and Narcissism
	An Amusement Park Controversy
	A Missing Handshake: From Gender Discrimination to Radical Islam
	Conclusion
	References
Chapter 5 Feeling Populist: Navigating Political Subjectivity in Post-socialist Romania
	The Trouble with Populism …
	Romanian Coal Miners of the Jiu Valley
	Laszlo’s Story: Law, Rights, Suffering, and Subjectivity
	2000–2007
	References
Chapter 6 Sensory Politics and War: Affective Anchoring and Vitality in Nigeria and Kuwait
	Affects of Danger
	Sensory Politics and Religion
	Musa and Mediated Islam in Northern Nigeria
	Dahlia, Mediating Conflict in Kuwait
	Dis/sociating
	References
Chapter 7 The Ungendered Self: Sex Reassignment, the Third Gender, and Gender Fluidity in India
	The Rise of the Transgender and SRS in the Global North
	The Third Gender in India
	The Inner Feminine
	Living and Negotiating Inconsistent Logics of Gender
	Reimagining Gender Fluidity
	Conclusion
	References
Part II Becoming a Political Actor
Chapter 8 Mediating Moralities: Intersubjectivities in Israeli Soldiers’ Narratives of the Occupation
	How Do Persons Transform Politically?
	Working Against the Grain: Soldiers Narrating Their Service in the Territories
	A Person-Centered Ethnography: The Political as a Personal Process
	Personal Forming of the Political: The Role of Mediations
	References
Chapter 9 An Ethnographic Life Narrative Strategy for Studying Race, Identity, and Acts of Political Significance: Black Racial Identity Theory and the Rastafari of Jamaica
	A Sketch of Black Identity Theories and Nigrescence Theory
	An Ethnographic Life Narrative Strategy for Studying Identity in the Context of Race and Political Ideology
	The Rastafari People of Jamaica: Identity, Race, Politics, 1930s–1960s
	Rastafari, Blackness, and Acts of Political Significance in the Life of an Elder Rastafari
		Early Years, Seeking and Learning
		Becoming and Being Rastafari
		Political Subjectivity and Acts of Political Significance
	Applying and Extending Nigrescence Theory
	Conclusion
	References
Chapter 10 Political Becoming in Movements: Lessons from the Environmental, Tea Party, and Rastafari Movements
	Introduction
	Culture and the Person
	Political Becoming in Practice: Cultural Mediation and Situatedness
	Pastor Wilson’s Political Becoming and Changes in the Environmental Movement
	Kevin’s Political Becoming in Environmental Conflict
	Sandy’s Becoming in the Emergence of the Well-Resourced Tea Party
	Janine’s Becoming in the Early Tea Party
	Political Becoming in a Hostile Jamaica
	Discussion and Conclusions
	References
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 214

trauma assessment in Kuwait—nor other trauma syndromes, or depression23;
her parents did not express concern about her behavior, nor did she seek
treatment for health or mental ill health until her teenage years.

In her self-assessment, Dahlia felt moderate to severe affective bodily distress
after the 2003 US War in Iraq, and she reported a combination of tension,
headaches, low mood, gastrointestinal problems, and benign tumors.

Dahlia, then living with her father, mother and younger brother as her older
siblings had married, watched televised news reports of the US

attack. As she narrated this period, Dahlia made frequent references to war
sensoria—the sights, sounds, and movements of war—changing the tone and
urgency of her communication. She started to worry, she said, “we are close;”
“war can get into our country;” “everybody is against us.” Similar narratives
circulated among Kuwaiti young adults and regional neighbors in social media
and blogs, and in response to Kuwaiti air siren drills. Dahlia said her father was
“ok” with the war; “Kuwaitis after the invasion don’t like Iraqis and they’re ok
with the war.” But, Dahlia “did not like this way of thinking,” and she began to
turn to religion for help with the growing conflicts inside her. Similar to Musa,
Dahlia attempted to harmonize “inner” experiences with “outer” behaviors. She
veiled and prayed more frequently. Dahlia felt she could not express herself in
public, whether at home or outside the home, and she became increasingly quiet,
with alternating bursts of anger. Dahlia 166

C. CASEY

developed “tension,” “headaches,” and “problems with her colon,” and she went
to a general practitioner who prescribed medication, but she did not feel better.
Dahlia then thought it might be a problem with her ovaries. She went to another
doctor who found a tumor, which he diagnosed as benign.

Dahlia described herself as increasingly “emotional.” She was living in the
family home where she had experienced the 1990 Iraqi invasion and occupation.
Televised depictions of US tanks destroying other tanks, and the sounds of
bombs, made Dahlia increasingly tense. She stopped watching television and
turned to the Internet for information, but responded again to age-mates in
neighboring countries. Dahlia found “everyone against us,” or “against the
invasion” and US occupation of Iraq. Dalia began having trouble with sleep,

Page 428

Sensory Politics and Religion
Musa and Mediated Islam in Northern Nigeria
Dahlia, Mediating Conflict in Kuwait
Dis/sociating
References

Chapter 7 The Ungendered Self: Sex Reassignment, the Third Gender, and
Gender Fluidity in India

The Rise of the Transgender and SRS in the Global North
The Third Gender in India
The Inner Feminine
Living and Negotiating Inconsistent Logics of Gender
Reimagining Gender Fluidity
Conclusion
References

Part II Becoming a Political Actor
Chapter 8 Mediating Moralities: Intersubjectivities in Israeli Soldiers’
Narratives of the Occupation

How Do Persons Transform Politically?
Working Against the Grain: Soldiers Narrating Their Service in the
Territories
A Person-Centered Ethnography: The Political as a Personal Process
Personal Forming of the Political: The Role of Mediations
References

Chapter 9 An Ethnographic Life Narrative Strategy for Studying Race,
Identity, and Acts of Political Significance: Black Racial Identity Theory
and the Rastafari of Jamaica

A Sketch of Black Identity Theories and Nigrescence Theory
An Ethnographic Life Narrative Strategy for Studying Identity in the
Context of Race and Political Ideology
The Rastafari People of Jamaica: Identity, Race, Politics, 1930s–1960s
Rastafari, Blackness, and Acts of Political Significance in the Life of
an Elder Rastafari

Early Years, Seeking and Learning
Becoming and Being Rastafari
Political Subjectivity and Acts of Political Significance

Applying and Extending Nigrescence Theory
Conclusion
References

Chapter 10 Political Becoming in Movements: Lessons from the

Page 429

Environmental, Tea Party, and Rastafari Movements
Introduction
Culture and the Person
Political Becoming in Practice: Cultural Mediation and Situatedness
Pastor Wilson’s Political Becoming and Changes in the Environmental
Movement
Kevin’s Political Becoming in Environmental Conflict
Sandy’s Becoming in the Emergence of the Well-Resourced Tea Party
Janine’s Becoming in the Early Tea Party
Political Becoming in a Hostile Jamaica
Discussion and Conclusions
References

Index

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