Download Personality Characteristics Associated with Academic PDF

TitlePersonality Characteristics Associated with Academic
LanguageEnglish
File Size918.2 KB
Total Pages99
Document Text Contents
Page 1

DOCUMENT RESUME

ED 446 484 HE 033 276

AUTHOR Hill, Allan B.
TITLE Personality Characteristics Associated with Academic

Achievement among Developmental College Students.
PUB DATE 1999-00-00
NOTE 96p.; Ed.D. Dissertation, The Fielding Institute.
PUB TYPE Dissertations/Theses Doctoral Dissertations (041)
EDRS PRICE MF01/PC04 Plus Postage.
DESCRIPTORS Academic Achievement; At Risk Persons; Cognitive

Development; *College Students; Colleges; *Developmental
Programs; Developmental Studies Programs; Educational
Psychology; Educational Theories; Educationally
Disadvantaged; Higher Education; Learning Strategies;
*Psychological Characteristics; Remedial Programs; Special
Needs Students; Transitional Programs; Universities

ABSTRACT
This study was conducted to identify the personality

characteristics of high achieving developmental, or remedial, students and to
discover how personality characteristics relate to academic performance among
high-achieving developmental and non-developmental college students to
determine if a correlation exists between personality and performance. The
personality types of a sample of developmental honor society students (N=38)
were compared to those of a sample of non-developmental honor society
students (N=75) based on their responses to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
(MBTI). Findings contribute to the body of research on developmental student
characteristics and substantiate previous research that reports personality
characteristics contribute and enhance the academic performance of
developmental students. Recommendations for further research are included.
Appendix A describes the MBTI personality types. Appendix B presents data on
XAE Honor Society students; Appendix C, PBK Honor Society students. Appendix
D contains data on the MBTI type groups. (HB)

Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made
from the original document.

Page 2

SCOPE OF INTEREST NOTICE

PERSONALITY CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATED WITH ACADEMIC tthoist gleo t

The ERIC Facility has assigned

to:
this document for processing

ACHIEVEMENT AMONG DEVELOPMENTAL COLLEGESTUDENTS
Indexing should reflect their
inghouses noted to the right.

special points of view.

-

A Dissertation Submitted

by

ALLAN B. HILL

to

The Fielding Institute

In partial fulfillment of
The requirements for the

Degree of

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION

U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION

Office of Educational
Research and Improvement

EDU ATIONAL RESOURCES
INFORMATION

CENTER (ERIC)

This document
has been

reproduced as

received from the person or
organization

originating it.

Minor changes
have been made to

improve reproduction
quality.

Points of view or
opinions stated in this

document do not
necessarily represent

official OERI
position or policy.

This dissertation has been
Accepted for the faculty of

THE FIELDING INSTITUTE by:

at, Ph.
Chair

111111/_ .4,4 .4
/ Jenny Edw4,4s, Ph. D.

Faculty ' eader

Frederick Feldman
Student Reader

u U 2

PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE AND
DISSEMINATE THIS MATERIAL HAS

B Ekl GRANTED BY

A. _1(
TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)

BESTCOPYAVAILABLE

Page 49

42

population for this study will consist of all members of XAE. Thirty-eight students

participated in the study.

Instruments

Two instruments were used to collect data. The first instrument was a brief

personal information questionnaire that identified the participant's name, age, gender,

ethnicity, enrollment status, and academic major. The second instrument was Form "F"

of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a 166-item, forced-choice survey based on

Jung's (1923) theory of psychological type.

As previously mentioned, the MBTI is concerned primarily with variations in

normal behaviors and attitudes and has been used since 1975 in a variety of applications,

including individual counseling and psychotherapy, career counseling, improving

teacher-student interactions in education, leadership development in organizations and

management, and improving interpersonal relations in multicultural settings (Myers,

McCaulley, Quenk, & Hammer, 1998). The purpose of the MBTI is to identify

individual preferences concerning perception and judgment.

Jung's (1923) theory of type states that apparent random variation in human

behavior is not random at all, rather, orderly and consistent due to fundamental

differences in the way people choose to use their perception and judgment (Myers &

Myers, 1980). Perception includes the various ways of gathering information or

becoming aware of things or ideas. Judgment includes the ways in which conclusions are

drawn based on what has been perceived.

1/4) 49

Page 50

43

The MBTI contains four distinct dichotomous scales. Each scale reflects one of

four basic preferences, which, according to Jung's theory, direct the use of perception and

judgment. That is, individual preferences affect what one attends to as well as how one

draws conclusions about what is perceived. The four dichotomous scales are:

Extraversion (E) vs. Introversion (I)

Intuition (N) vs. Sensing (S)

Thinking (T) vs. Feeling (F)

Perceiving (P) vs. Judging (J)

The main objective of the MBTI is to identify which of two opposite categories is

preferred on each of the four dichotomies. The letters E or I, S or N, T or F, and J or P

are used to designate which of the opposite sides of a respondent's nature are preferred.

When all four preference scores have been calculated, the type formula is

determined, which consists of one letter for each of the four scores (E or I, S or N, T or F,

J or P). The four letters (e.g., ENFJ) define type structure. Characteristics of the type are

derived from its separate preferences and the postulated interactions between them based

on Jungian theory and decades of research and observation by Myers.

There are 16 possible combinations of preferences, each describing a different personality

type indicated below:

50

Page 98

Reproduction Release Page 2 of 3

Documents will be processed as indicated provided reproduction quality permits.
If permission to reproduce is granted, but no box is checked, documents will be processed at Level 1.

I hereby grant to the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) nonexclusive permission to reproduce and
disseminate this document as indicated above. Reproduction from the ERIC microfiche, or electronic media by persons
other than ERIC employees and its system contractors requires permission from the copyright holder. Exception is
made for non-profit reproduction by libraries and other service agencies to satisfy information needs of educators in
response to discrete inquiries.

Signature:
Printed Name/Position/Title:

/904/4/ e. %Wee/ O. //r-e, 44-6-V(
Organization/Ad ess:

a) k.-0 a/CZ/eft ./ C c
/.72- .Z.o,)/Pe.eet._ 4'irAV-7/-
42°., r .7 d'e. rre-t.d p rt' / f3 c f 2-

Telephone:

eia) Kr. J.f.-6 7
Fax:

Pt,) i<iC 1-10"v
E-mail Address:

erA; / 1et t i 'A)eLy9A. .eic.
Date:

'97F/ez)

III. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY INFORMATION (FROM NON-ERIC SOURCE):

If permission to reproduce is not granted to ERIC, or, if you wish ERIC to cite the availability of the document from
another source, please provide the following information regarding the availability of the document. (ERIC will not
announce a document unless it is publicly available, and a dependable source can be specified. Contributors should also
be aware that ERIC selection criteria are significantly more stringent for documents that cannot be made available
through EDRS.)

Publisher/Distributor:

Address:

Price:

IV. REFERRAL OF ERIC TO COPYRIGHT/REPRODUCTION RIGHTS HOLDER:

If the right to grant this reproduction release is held by someone other than the addressee, please provide the appropriate
name and address:

Name:

Address:

V. WHERE TO SEND THIS FORM:

http://ericfac.piccard.csc.com/reprod.html 9/8/00

Page 99

Reproduction Release Page 3 of 3

Send this form to the following ERIC Clearinghouse:

However, if solicited by the ERIC Facility, or if making an unsolicited contribution to ERIC, return this form (and the
document being contributed) to:

ERIC Processing and Reference Facility
4483-A Forbes Boulevard
Lanham, Maryland 20706
Telephone: 301-552-4200
Toll Free: 800-799-3742

e-mail: [email protected]
WWW: http://ericfac.piccard.csc.com

EFF-088 (Rev. 9/97)

http://ericfac.piccard.csc.com/reprod.html 9/8/00

Similer Documents