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Table of Contents
                            Personality Assessment: New Research
Contents
Preface
Research and Review Studies
	Child and Adolescent Personality Development and Assessment: A Developmental Psychopathology Approach
		Abstract
		I. Emotional and Personality Development
		II. Relational Influences on Emotion and Personality Development
		III. Normal and Abnormal Personality Development: A Developmental Psychopathology Approach
		Future Directions
		IV. Recommendations for Assessment: A Multidimensional, Multicontextual, Multimethod, Developmental Psychopathology Approach
		Conclusion
		References
	Integrating Evidence-Based Treatment into an Attachment Guided Curriculum in a Therapeutic Preschool: Initial Findings
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Literature Support
		Study
		Method
		Results
		Conclusion
		References
	Assessing Individuals for Team "Worthiness": Investigating the Intersection of the Big Five Personality Factors, Organizational Citizenship Behavior, and Teamwork Aptitude
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Personality Assessment in Personnel Selection: A Little History
		The Big Five Personality Factors and the Five-Factor Model of Personality
		Organizational Citizenship Behaviors
		Cognitive Ability and Teams: Teamwork Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs)
		Team Worthiness?
		Purpose of Study
		Method
		Results
		Discussion
		Conclusion
		Author's Notes
		References
	Personality Traits and Daily Moods
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Method
		Results
		Conclusion
		References
	Weight? Wait! Importance Weighting of Satisfaction Scores in Quality of Life Assessment
		Abstract
		Introduction
		1. Importance Weighting in Quality of Life
		2. Utility of Importance Weighting
		3. Appropriateness of Importance Weighting
		4. Summary and Implications
		Conclusion
		References
	A Psycho-Social Approach to Meanings and Functions of Trait Labels
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Trait Psychology: Basis and Limitations
		Conclusion
		A Psycho-Social Approach to Trait Labels: Traits as Polysemous Entities
		Conclusion
		References
	Comparing the Psychometric Properties of the Common Items in the Short and Abbreviated Versions of the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaires: A Mean and Covariance Structures Analysis Approach
		Abstract
		Method
		Results
		Discussion
		References
	Successful Psychopathy: Unresolved Issues and Future Directions
		Psychopathy: What it is, and What it isn't
		What is "Successful" Psychopathy?
		Assessment of Successful Psychpathy
		Detecting the Successful Psychopath: Modern Research Efforts
		Successful Psychopathy: Evidence from Psychophysiology and Neurobiology
		Future Directions in Understanding the Successful Psychopath
		Note
		References
	Score Reliability in Personality Research
		Introduction
		Types of Score Reliability
		Estimation Methods for Score Reliability
		Standards for Interpreting Reliability Coefficients
		Additional Considerations for Reporting and Interpreting Reliability Data
		Conclusion
		References
	Restyling Personality Assessments
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Personality Assessors: Others Versus Self
		Reporting Assesments: Absolute versus Relative Scales
		Conclusion
		References
	Theory and Practice in the Use and Interpretation of Likert-Type Scales within a Cross-Cultural Context
		Abstract
		The Collectivist-Individualist Impression-Expression (ImpExp) Model of Responding to Questionnaires
		From Theory to Practice: Measuring the Effect of Collectivist and Individualist Attributes on Likert-Type Questionnaires (Study 1)
		From Theory to Practice: Cross-Natural or Cross-Cultural Effects (Study 2)
		General Discussion and Conclusions
		References
	Construct and Response Bias Correlates in Summated Scale Definitions of Personality Traits
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Measuring Personality
		Response Bias in Personality Assessment
		Summary and Research Agenda
		Methods
		Analyses
		Conclusion
		References
	Academic and Everyday Procrastination and their Relation to the Five-Factor Model
		Abstract
		Procrastination in Everyday Life
		Academic Procrastination
		Procrastination and Personality
		Procrastination, Achievement Motivation and Gender Differences
		The Five Factor Model (FFM) of Personality
		Hypotheses
		Method
		Results
		Discussion
		References
	Personality and Attitude Toward Dreams
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Existing Research on Attitude Toward Dreams
		Definition of the Attitude Toward Dreams
		Attitude Toward Dreams and Personality
		Method
		Results
		Conclusion
		References
	Social Dominance Orientation, Ambivalent Sexism, and Abortion: Explaining Pro-Choice and Pro-Life Attitudes
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Current Investigation
		Method
		Results
		Discussion
		Limitations
		Conclusion
		References
	Factor Structure. Sex Effects and Differential Item Functioning of the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised - Abbreviated: A Multiple-Indicators Multiple-Causes Approach
		Abstract
		Method
		Data Analysis
		Results
		Factor Structure of the JEPQR-A
		Evaluation of Direct Sex Effect on the JEPQR-A Items
		Evaluation of Sex and Age Effects on the JEPQR-A Factors
		Discussion
		References
Short Communications
	Online Collaborative Learning: The Challenge of Change
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Literature Review
		Goals of the Course Module
		Description of the Module
		Method
		Results
		Discussion
		Limitations of the Study
		Conclusion
		References
	The Influence of Personality and Symptoms Severity on Functioning Patients with Schizophrenia
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Method
		Results
		Discussion
		References
	Circumventing Self-Reflection When Measuring Emotions: The Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test (IPANAT)
		Abstract
		Introduction
		Implicit Affect
		The Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test
		Empirical Research with the IPANAT
		Summary
		References
	Structured MMPI-2 Client Feedback in the Identification of Potential Supplemental Targets of Change
		Abstract
		Structured MMPI-2 Client Feedback in the Identification of Potential Supplemental Targets of Change
		Selection of Targets ofr Change in Contemporary Psychotherapy
		References
	Beyond the Traits of the Five Factor Model: Using Deviant Personality Traits to Predict Deviant Behavior in Organizations
		Machiavellianism
		Narcissism
		Psychopathy
		Relationship between the Dark Traid and the Five Factor Model
		Integrating the Dark Triad into Industrial and Organizational Psychology
		Conclusion
		References
	On the Test-Retest Reliability of the Autobiographical Memory Test
		Abstract
		On the Test-Retest Reliability of the Autobiographical Memory Test
		Method
		Results and Discussion
		References
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 221

Successful Psychopathy: Unresolved Issues and Future Directions 199

parenting practices) that account for the differences in behavioral expression within twin
pairs.

Indeed, a particularly critical consideration in future research on successful psychopathy
is the investigation of buffering variables that may attenuate the expression of the behavioral
deviance often associated with psychopathy. Hall and Benning (2006) noted that intelligence,
socio-economic status, planning abilty, and autonomic hyperreactivity are among the
variables with theoretical and practical importance for regulating psychopathic impulses.
They also urged further investigation of putative protective factors (e.g., parental
characteristics, social functioning) that may enhance socialization, thus limiting the
perpetration of antisocial behavior among psychopathic individuals. Indeed, it is not clear
whether successful psychopaths merely have a less extreme form of the same basic disorder
as their criminal counterparts, although recent research (Raine et al., 2004) indicates that
structural brain differences may differentiate criminal from noncriminal psychopaths. A better
understanding of the etiology and developmental trajectory of psychopathy may point us
toward decisive environmental influences that mitigate against the expression of antisocial
behavior in predisposed individuals.




NOTE

It is not clear that criminal versus noncriminal psychopaths comprise two separate groups

that are etiologically and catergorically distinct. For ease of discussion, however, we use this
distinction to highlight the differences between successful versus unsuccessful psychopathy.




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Page 442

Index



420

thresholds, 231, 391
time constraints, 82
time consuming, 33, 34, 367, 402
time periods, 105
time pressure, 174, 263, 278
toddlers, 3, 15, 30, 37
tolerance, 12, 347
top-down, 132
toughness, 20
traction, 264
trade, 343
trade-off, 343
tradition, xi, 18, 65, 141, 143, 172, 219, 230
traditional gender role, 312, 313, 318, 322
traffic, 289
trainees, 66
training, 33, 293, 307, 360, 386
traits, x, xi, xii, xiii, xvi, xvii, 7, 8, 9, 19, 21, 22, 23,

24, 25, 83, 95, 97, 104, 105, 141, 142, 143, 145,
146, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156,
157, 158, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 167, 168, 188,
189, 190, 192, 193, 196, 198, 200, 232, 259, 261,
262, 266, 296, 297, 298, 305, 333, 361, 365, 368,
370, 389, 391, 392, 393, 394

trajectory, 13, 16, 50, 199
transactions, 8, 142
transcendence, 354, 357
transcripts, 349
transformation, 117, 130
transition, xv, 20, 41, 229, 339, 341
translation, 144, 281
translational, 57
transmission, 341, 343, 346
transpose, 229
trauma, x, 24, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 56, 58, 60, 402
traumatic experiences, 52, 59
travel, 154
trial, 125, 385, 387
tribal, 292
trust, 26, 49, 50, 51, 52, 67, 91, 105, 229, 280, 321,

390, 399
T-test, 54, 55
Turkey, 321
turnover, 114, 149
twin studies, 24, 42, 279
twins, 198, 201
two-dimensional, 150, 274
two-way, 132
typology, xiv, 277, 286

U

Uganda, 57

uncertainty, 257, 264, 275
unclassified, 13
undergraduate, 75, 97, 115, 116, 119, 120, 122, 123,

131, 153, 245, 250, 264, 280, 393
undergraduates, xvii, 120, 132, 195, 397
underlying mechanisms, 228
undifferentiated schizophrenia, 355
uniform, 268
United States, 38, 48, 64, 313, 322
univariate, 77
universality, 150
universe, 210
universities, 17, 193, 281
unstructured interviews, 33, 34

V

vacuum, 155
valence, 150, 161, 267, 294, 367, 394
validation, 89, 92, 137, 167, 198, 201, 276, 312, 377
validity, xii, xvi, 31, 32, 33, 53, 64, 68, 88, 89, 92,

96, 149, 193, 194, 200, 202, 205, 211, 220, 225,
249, 257, 273, 274, 275, 360, 362, 365, 366, 368,
370, 378, 386, 393, 396

values, 8, 17, 18, 67, 82, 112, 113, 131, 134, 135,
149, 151, 154, 155, 161, 172, 173, 175, 176, 177,
178, 180, 182, 183, 184, 219, 241, 242, 245, 258,
270, 272, 279, 284, 328, 329, 330, 334, 359, 390

variability, 7, 97, 104, 106, 122, 145, 146, 165, 177,
218, 378

variables, xi, xiv, xv, 21, 74, 75, 77, 80, 82, 83, 84,
89, 97, 99, 109, 110, 112, 113, 114, 116, 117,
119, 124, 127, 134, 135, 136, 142, 143, 150, 164,
179, 194, 195, 196, 199, 206, 231, 236, 237, 264,
276, 277, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 312, 319, 341,
351, 352, 354, 358, 359, 369

variance, x, xiii, 63, 70, 85, 86, 90, 113, 117, 134,
147, 152, 163, 173, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213,
219, 261, 262, 264, 267, 268, 270, 271, 272, 273,
283, 352, 358, 367, 368, 391, 394

variation, 118, 143, 207, 210, 372
varimax rotation, 83
vector, 211
vein, 115, 156, 366
velvet, 321
victimization, 48
victims, 48, 319, 322
Victoria, 174, 328
video clips, 156
videoconferencing, xv, 339, 340, 341, 342
violence, 20, 37, 40, 44, 59, 60, 189
violent, 189, 203, 363
violent behavior, 189, 203

Page 443

Index



421

visible, 3, 158, 249
vision, 340
visual memory, 308
vocabulary, 13, 146, 157, 163
vocational, 144
vocational interests, 144
voice, 10
vulnerability, 22, 26, 27, 28, 40, 41, 42, 45, 57, 280,

300, 303, 304, 398
vulnerability to depression, 42, 398
Vygotsky, 48, 61

W

waking, xiv, 98, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 298,
303, 304, 308

walking, 226
war, 192, 353
warrants, 9
water, 154, 187, 346
WCST, 197
weakness, 35, 57, 273, 320
wealth, 17, 151
web, 220, 240, 266, 321
websites, 313, 316
weight status, 133
wellbeing, 294, 304
well-being, 11, 12, 96, 97, 135, 136, 138, 139, 189,

293, 303

Western culture, 286
winning, 253, 255
winter, 51
Wisconsin, 197
wisdom, 220
withdrawal, 14, 25, 45
women, x, xiv, 76, 95, 96, 98, 99, 101, 103, 104,

105, 106, 107, 264, 277, 279, 280, 285, 286, 288,
291, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 304, 305, 312,
313, 314, 315, 318, 319, 320, 321, 355

work environment, 30
work ethic, 312
workers, 118, 138
working groups, 343
workload, 73
workplace, 90, 313, 347, 393, 394, 395
World Health Organization (WHO), 111, 138, 139
World War I, 64
worldview, 369, 370, 371
worry, 179, 187, 330, 331, 333, 354, 385
writing, 194, 293, 296, 369, 393

Y

yes/no, 262, 316
yield, 39, 53, 65, 196, 198, 219, 285
younger children, 32

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