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TitlePersonal Competencies in Personalized Learning
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.0 MB
Total Pages48
Document Text Contents
Page 1

by
Sam Redding

Learning
relational suasion

competencies

sc
ho

ol

community

classroom
enhancement

co
nt

ex
ts

school communitypersonalization
teachers

students

re
la

tio
ns

hi
ps

technology
curriculum

instruction
delivery

ne
ed

s

pr
ef

er
en

ce
s

differentiation

environmentfamilies

sc
af

fo
ld

in
g

motivation
metacognition

social-emotional competency

self-direction

masteryengagement

management

go
al

s

decisions

data

proficiency
assessment

metrics

learning habits

prior knowledge

skills

reinforcement

age

quality

co
gn

iti
on

peer group

ou
tc

om
es

pr
og

ra
m

s

interests home
parents

extramural activities

strategies

behaviors

culture
routines

ch
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ce
s

indicators

evidence

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lit
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science

expectations

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habit formation

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seat time
communicationimprovement

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Learning

Page 2

www.centeril.org

The Center on Innovations in Learning (CIL) is a national content center established to work with regional comprehensive
centers and state education agencies (SEA) to build SEAs’ capacity to stimulate, select, implement, and scale up innovations
in learning.
Learning innovations replace currently accepted standards of curricular and instructional practice with new practices dem-
onstrated to be more effective or more efficient in the context in which they are applied.
The Center on Innovations in Learning is administered by the Institute for Schools and Society (ISS) at Temple University,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in partnership with the Academic Development Institute (ADI), Lincoln, Illinois.
The Center is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE), under the
comprehensive centers program, Award # S283B120052-12A.
The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position of the supporting agencies, and no official endorse-
ment should be inferred.
Cover design by Stephen Page; text design and layout by Pam Sheley.

©2014 Center on Innovations in Learning, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA

www.centeril.org

Page 24

Personal Competencies

18

Table 2. Metacognitive Competency in the School Community
Indicator: The School Community
Council ensures that all school
personnel and volunteers understand
metacognitive competency and their
roles relative to its enhancement in
students.

Objective: The School Community
Council will ensure that all school
personnel and volunteers understand
metacognitive competency and their
roles relative to its enhancement in
students.

Evidence: Copies of job descriptions
and descriptions of role of volunteers.
Surveys of personnel and volunteers.
Pre- and post-questionnaires from
professional development.

Goals and Roles: Include in job
descriptions and description
of role of volunteers ways to
enhance students’ metacognitive
competency.

Resources: Job descriptions and
description of role of volunteers, job aides
to support practices in action

Technology-aided Resources: online
resource library of related articles and
digital video samples of volunteers
enhancing metacognitive competency;
“recommended” lists of time-
management and task organization
software and apps for use within the
school day

Education: Provide professional
development for all school
personnel and volunteers on
metacognitive competency.

Resources: Curricula and protocol for
professional development leaders for
face-to-face and for synchronous and
asynchronous online delivery

Technology-aided Resources: Webinars;
interactive learning modules;
e-workbooks; in-situ and post workshop
online surveys of relevance, utility, and
application; “recommended” lists of
time-management, task organization, and
other related software and tools

Page 25

Personalized Learning

19

Table 3. Motivational Competency in the School Community
Theory of Action When the entire school community works together to enhance students’

motivational competency, every student will more persistently engage with
learning.

Goal All members of the school community (families, students, administrators,
teachers, other school personnel, and volunteers) will understand and support
the importance of motivational competency, including a growth mindset, value
of mastery, and connecting learning tasks with students’ personal aspirations.

Logic Model
Indicator/Objective/Evidence Strategy Resources, Technology

Indicator: The School Community
Council ensures that all parents
understand motivational competency
(a growth mindset, the value of
mastery, and connecting learning tasks
with students’ personal aspirations)
and how they can enhance
motivational competency at home.

Objective: The School Community
Council will ensure that all parents will
understand motivational competency
(a growth mindset, the value of
mastery, and connecting learning tasks
with students’ personal aspirations)
and how they can enhance
motivational competency at home.

Evidence: Documentation of
initiatives. Surveys administered to
parents confirm their understanding
of motivational competency and
how they can enhance motivational
competency at home. Pre- and post-
questionnaires from professional
development workshops.

Communication: Provide
information for parents on the
school community’s goal for building
motivational competency and how
parents can support their children’s
growth mindset, value of mastery,
and connection of learning tasks
with personal aspirations.

Resources: Newsletter; community “town
hall” discussion

Technology-aided Resources: School
website section for parents; parent
feedback via website; ongoing social
media campaign; streaming and archived
video of “town hall” meetings; online
library of digital videos of student,
parents, graduates, and educators on
the importance of personalization and
motivational competency

Education: Provide workshops for
parents on motivational competency
(a growth mindset, the value of
mastery, and connecting learning
tasks with students’ personal
aspirations) and how they can
enhance motivational competency
at home.

Resources: Curricula and protocol for
workshops and workshop leaders for
face-to-face and for synchronous and
asynchronous online delivery

Technology-aided Resources: Webinars;
interactive learning modules;
e-workbooks; in-situ and post workshop
online surveys of relevance, utility, and
application; “recommended” lists of
software, apps, and procedures designed
to help increase motivation, for use at
home

Connection: Include a discussion
of motivational competency and
the parents’ role in enhancing their
children’s motivational competency
at home at the open house
and in parent–teacher–student
conferences.

Resources: Agendas for open houses and
parent–teacher–student conferences;
guiding questions

Technology-aided Resources: Online
resource library of digital articles, and
video samples of parent/child interactions
and parent/educator discussions for
modeling and review

Page 47

For more information about Personal Competencies
please visit

www.centeril.org
Through the Student’s Eyes: A Perspective on

Personalized Learning

Handbook on Innovations in Learning

Personal Competency: A Framework for
Building Students’ Capacity to Learn

The Something Other: Personal Competencies
for Learning and Life

and other publications and resources

www.centeril.org

Page 48

www.centeril.org

www.centeril.org

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