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TitlePerson-Centred Planning for Professionals
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size2.7 MB
Total Pages332
Table of Contents
                            Front Cover
Half-title
Title Page
Copyright Page
Dedication
Contents
List of contributors
Introduction
Chapter 1:  Exploring the history of person centred practice
Chapter 2:  Towards person centred practice
Chapter 3:  Person centred thinking
Chapter 4:  Person centred partnerships
Chapter 5:  Person centred approaches to educating the learning disability workforce
Chapter 6:  Person centred approaches to meeting the health needs of people who have a learning disability
Chapter 7:  Communication
Chapter 8:  Meeting the needs of people from diverse backgrounds through person centred planning
Chapter 9:  Person centred transition
Chapter 10:  People with learning disabilities planning for themselves
Chapter 11:  Families leading person centred planning
Chapter 12:  Support planning
Chapter 13:  Creating community inclusion
Index
Back Cover
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

MH-B_R_S.EPS


www.openup.co.uk

PERSON CENTRED PRACTICE for Professionals
This valuable text offers a range of practical, person centred and
evidence-based approaches to tackling challenges faced by
professionals working with people with learning disabilities. It helps the
reader to analyze issues relating to person centred practice and
citizenship, and considers the implications of this key government
initiative for health and social care professionals.

The authors aim to support professionals in working through this
changing agenda, whilst identifying the interface between their own
professional practice and person centred approaches to working with
people who have a learning disability. The book includes well
referenced practical approaches to the subject area, alongside creative
and innovative thinking.

In addition, the book also:
• Explores the historical context of learning disability services

and how this has contributed to the development of person
centred services

• Introduces a range of practical person centred thinking tools
that can be readily used within professional practice

• Contains a model to inform the delivery and integration of
person centred practice within professional practice

• Considers the contribution of a range of different
professional roles to the person centred and self-directed
support approach

• Evaluates the relevance of person centred thinking and
planning to people from different cultural backgrounds and
those undergoing the transition from adolescence to
adulthood

Person Centred Practice for Professionals is key reading for students,
academics and professionals working or training to work with people
with learning disabilities.

Jeanette Thompson is the self-directed support programme manager
for Sheffield City Council, UK.

Jackie Kilbane works as an independent Organisation Consultant and
Facilitator.

Helen Sanderson leads H.S.A, a development agency exploring how
person centred thinking and planning can change peoples lives,
organizations and communities. She is the expert advisor on person
centred planning to the Valuing People Support Team.

Cover design Hybert Design • www.hybertdesign.com

PERSON CENTRED
PRACTICE

for Professionals

EDITED BY
Jeanette Thompson, Jackie Kilbane
& Helen Sanderson

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Page 166

view of key information about how Jane communicates and how to better
support her during challenging times. Jane’s staff felt that the charts were
especially useful in supporting her as she communicates both through words
and her behaviours. These approaches established a supportive system which
ensured that Jane’s communication is respected and valid.

Communication charts

The communication chart is a simple but powerful way to record how some-
one communicates with their behaviour. While this is a critical tool to have
when people do not communicate with words, it is also important to use when
communication with behaviour is clearer than the communication with
words or when what people say and mean are different. Using the � rst person
is more powerful, but it carries with it a responsibility. Only use the � rst per-
son, when the person whose chart it is, is clearly in control of what is written
in each column. In all other instances, the chart should be completed using
the third person. Consequently, it is vital in developing any person centred
plan where the voice of the person is being represented, that professionals
begin gathering information with the people who know the person best and
then check this out with others. The person’s family are often the best people
to begin with, or if they do not live with their family, then friends and the
people who support them may be useful.

The � rst section of any communication chart, which identi� es how
supporters think the person communicates with others, has four headings:

• What is happening: this describes the circumstances.
• What the person does: in terms that are clear to a reader who has not

seen the behaviour to the extent they would instantly recognise it.
For people where it is hard to describe (e.g. a facial expression), a
picture or even a video recording may be preferred.

• We think it means: describes the meaning that people think is present –
a ‘best guess’ is � ne when the meaning is not clear. It is not uncommon
for there to be more than one meaning for a single behaviour. Where
this is the case, all of the meanings should be listed.

• We should: describes what those who provide support are to do in
response to what the person is saying with their behaviour. The
responses under this heading give a great deal of insight into how the
person is perceived and supported. It is easiest to complete the com-
munication worksheet by starting from the two left-hand columns
� rst, starting with ‘What is happening . . .’, and then moving onto
‘We think it means’, and then working out to the two right-hand
columns.

COMMUNICATION 151

Page 167

Another type of communication chart that can be developed (as illus-
trated in Table 7.3), is for use when people are using total communication to
support a person who has different ways of communicating, including verbal
communication and where people communicate through their behaviour.
This approach can record how supporters involved in a person’s life, are trying
to communicate with the person. Instead of recording what the person does,
the person’s supporters can record what they are attempting to communicate
to the person and furthermore, what they are encouraging the person to do.
This type of communication chart has four headings:

• At this time this column is particularly useful when there are specific
days of the week, or times of the day that need to be clearly identified
and acted upon.

• We want to let . . . know
• We do/say this . . .
• Helped/supported by . . .

Table 7.3 Supporters’ communication chart

At this time We want to let
Jane know . . .

We do/say this . . . Helped/supported by . . .

That Jane has
made a mistake
with her work/
task/activity

Explain her mistake to her IN
PRIVATE. Do not use contracted
negatives, but show her how to
fulfil her task using positive
sentences. NEVER directly
criticise Jane

Stay nearby in case Jane
needs further assistance.
Encourage Jane by
telling her when she has
done something well

It is home time Show Jane her ‘home’ symbol
and reinforce this by saying ‘It is
home time’

Jane does not like
waiting more than 5
minutes. After this time,
support Jane by either
reading with her or by
sitting and talking with
her. Jane also enjoys
relaxing with her iPod
on and needs assistance
to start this running

There has been a
change to Jane’s
plans

Tell Jane as soon as you know,
honestly explaining to Jane the
reasons why. Use Jane’s symbol
timetable to show Jane when
she will next be doing the
activity/task

Be honest with Jane.
Know that it is
important to Jane to
plan an alternative
activity which she
enjoys doing

152 LOUISE SKELHORN AND KIM WILLIAMS

Page 331

value base
for those working with people with

learning disabilities, 101–2
Valuing People: A New Strategy for Learning

Disability for the 21st Century 9–10, 16,
27, 36, 47, 75, 106, 116–7, 131, 141,
193, 195, 290

Valuing People Support Teams, 107,
195

viewpoint
person centred planning, 30

visual clues
in total communication, 147

visual supports, 155
vocabulary

in total communication, 149–50
vocational quali� cations, 95–6
Voices Group, 297–8
voting

mental capacity and, 217

well-being
factors important to, 96–8

work
importance of, 97

workforce
skills to instil into, 103–4
training and developing, 106–9
what people with learning disabilities want

from, 104–6
working/not working

person centred planning, 247
person centred thinking tools, 127
tool for recording learning, 64–7
training to determine, 226–7

workload
balance of care managers’, 270–1

World Health Organisation, 156

Year 9 transition reviews, 196–8, 208
Year 10 transition reviews, 198–200, 208

316 INDEX

Page 332

MH-B_R_S.EPS


www.openup.co.uk

PERSON CENTRED PRACTICE for Professionals
This valuable text offers a range of practical, person centred and
evidence-based approaches to tackling challenges faced by
professionals working with people with learning disabilities. It helps the
reader to analyze issues relating to person centred practice and
citizenship, and considers the implications of this key government
initiative for health and social care professionals.

The authors aim to support professionals in working through this
changing agenda, whilst identifying the interface between their own
professional practice and person centred approaches to working with
people who have a learning disability. The book includes well
referenced practical approaches to the subject area, alongside creative
and innovative thinking.

In addition, the book also:
• Explores the historical context of learning disability services

and how this has contributed to the development of person
centred services

• Introduces a range of practical person centred thinking tools
that can be readily used within professional practice

• Contains a model to inform the delivery and integration of
person centred practice within professional practice

• Considers the contribution of a range of different
professional roles to the person centred and self-directed
support approach

• Evaluates the relevance of person centred thinking and
planning to people from different cultural backgrounds and
those undergoing the transition from adolescence to
adulthood

Person Centred Practice for Professionals is key reading for students,
academics and professionals working or training to work with people
with learning disabilities.

Jeanette Thompson is the self-directed support programme manager
for Sheffield City Council, UK.

Jackie Kilbane works as an independent Organisation Consultant and
Facilitator.

Helen Sanderson leads H.S.A, a development agency exploring how
person centred thinking and planning can change peoples lives,
organizations and communities. She is the expert advisor on person
centred planning to the Valuing People Support Team.

Cover design Hybert Design • www.hybertdesign.com

PERSON CENTRED
PRACTICE

for Professionals

EDITED BY
Jeanette Thompson, Jackie Kilbane
& Helen Sanderson

P
E

R
S
O

N
C

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N

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R

E
D

P
R

A
C

T
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fo

r P
ro

fe
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n
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