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TitlePerfect Personality Profiles
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size916.4 KB
Total Pages125
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Table of Contents
Copyright
About the Author
Other titles in the Perfect series
Perfect Personality Profiles
Content
Introduction
1 Why do employers measure personality?
	Personality and work performance
	The impact of situations on behaviour
	Job fit
	Organization fit
	What are questionnaires used for?
2 What is personality?
	Behavioural style
	Traits
	Types
3 Measuring personality
	Selection interviews
	Psychological measures of personality
	Example question styles
	Other approaches to measuring personality
4 What questionnaires measure
	Personality
	Competencies
	Emotional intelligence
	Motivation, values and interests
	Work styles
5 How employers use personality questionnaires
	Example personality profile and report
	Relating personality profiles to jobs
6 Completing a questionnaire
	Mode of presentation
	Preparation ahead of time
	Completing the questionnaire
	Hints on answering questions
	After completing the questionnaire
Standards in the use of questionnaires
Frequently asked questions
Further reading
Notes
Also available in Random House books
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Table of Contents

Cover

Copyright

About the Author

Other titles in the Perfect series

Perfect Personality Profiles

Content

Introduction

1 Why do employers measure personality?
Personality and work performance
The impact of situations on behaviour
Job fit
Organization fit
What are questionnaires used for?

2 What is personality?
Behavioural style
Traits
Types

3 Measuring personality
Selection interviews
Psychological measures of personality
Example question styles
Other approaches to measuring personality

4 What questionnaires measure

Page 62

the extrovert personality. However, exercises requiring quiet concentration may
be more of a challenge, and extroverts may struggle to concentrate on tests and
questionnaires or find it hard to focus on completing an application form
accurately.

People who are low on extroversion are described as introverts. These are people
who like to balance time spent with others with time on their own. They like to
think things through in their heads before sharing their ideas with others. They
may find meeting new people difficult or awkward and they prefer to avoid
noisy gatherings with many people because they are uncomfortable in such
situations and prefer to interact with a few people they know well in less hectic
surroundings. They are often quite reserved and would rather be ignored than
made the centre of attention. They are more comfortable deferring to others than
behaving in an assertive manner, and they may not enjoy influencing or leading
others. They tend to be modest and may be reticent about their own skills and
achievements or even underrate their capability. They usually keep their feelings
to themselves, and others may find them difficult to read. This can make them
slow to develop rapport with others and to develop new friendships.
Introverts are particularly suited to roles where there is minimal interaction

with others, such as working with machines, tending land or animals, and
working with information or computers. In jobs such as driving or operating
machinery people spend a great deal of time entirely on their own or with very
little opportunity to interact with others, and introverts are much more tolerant
than extroverts of this type of work. Introversion may also be a positive trait for
jobs that require being with others in a listening rather than a more active role,
such as being a counsellor or running focus groups. Introverts can also be good
team workers, but they are most comfortable in a low-key role.
Introverts can find the whole process of job seeking quite difficult. Their

ability to concentrate alone will help them in completing application forms and
collecting information in preparation for a selection day, but they may find the
social side of selection more difficult. They may be uncomfortable talking about
themselves at interview, and their natural modesty will make it difficult for them
to sell themselves effectively. Their natural tendency will be to give short, direct
answers to questions, and interviewers may struggle to get them to talk more
openly about themselves and their approach to work. Group exercises, requiring
interactions with many people, may be particularly difficult, and introverts may

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find a selection day a tiring experience. However, introverts can learn to present
themselves effectively at interview and may show their strengths in written
exercises, tests and questionnaires.

The majority of people are neither strong extroverts nor strong introverts. The
typical person is mildly to moderately extrovert, and this sort of person may be
similar to the extrovert described above, but in a more moderate manner. They
like having fun with others and enjoy parties and excitement, but in moderation.
They like to balance this type of experience with quieter, more restrained
activities. They don’t mind being the centre of attention from time to time, but
they like to be able to shade into the background sometimes. They are
reasonably comfortable meeting new people and establishing rapport but are
more comfortable with people they already know. They can cope with spending
time alone but like to connect with others when they can.
People who are moderately extrovert are suited to roles that have some

elements that require extrovert behaviour and some that do not. For example,
someone working in IT maintenance may spend time working directly on
computers without human interaction, but another part of the role may involve
training users on how to use the system and providing support, which will
require contact with people.
Less commonly, some people who are overall moderately extrovert may have

some features of a very extrovert behavioural style but not others. For example,
someone might be strongly gregarious and prefer lively surroundings but not be
very assertive and dislike trying to influence or persuade others. People with
these mixed types of behavioural style will be best suited to work that matches
their own characteristics.

Circle your answers to the questions below. Are they mostly in the High or Low
column? If it is a mixture of both you are likely to be moderately extrovert.

HIGH LOW

If you are tired, would you rather
spend time on your own or with
friends?

With friends Alone

Are you more of a talker or a listener? Talker Listener
Do you enjoy meeting new people? Yes No

Page 124

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Page 125

Perfect Interview

Max Eggert

All you need to get it right first time

Are you determined to succeed in you job search?
Do you want to make sure you have the edge on the other candidates?
Do you want to find out what interviewers are looking for?

is an invaluable guide for anyone who’s applying for jobs.
Written by a leading HR professional with years of experience in the field, it
explains how interviews are constructed, gives practical advice about how to
show yourself in your best light,and provides reallife examples to help you
practise at home. Whether you’re a graduate looking to take the first step on
the career ladder, or you’re planning an allimportant job change,

will help you stand out from the competition.

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