Download Oryx and Crake PDF

TitleOryx and Crake
LanguageEnglish
File Size1.2 MB
Total Pages282
Table of Contents
                            1
	Mango
	Flotsam
	Voice
2
	Bonfire
	OrganInc Farms
	Lunch
3
	Nooners
	Downpour
4
	Rakunk
	Hammer
	Crake
	Brainfrizz
	HottTotts
5
	Toast
	Fish
	Bottle
6
	Oryx
	Birdcall
	Roses
	Pixieland Jazz
7
	Sveltana
	Purring
	Blue
8
	SoYummie
	Happicuppa
	Applied Rhetoric
	Asperger’s U.
	Wolvogs
	Hypothetical
	Extinctathon
9
	Hike
	RejoovenEsense
	Twister
10
	Vulturizing
	AnooYoo
	Garage
	Gripless
11
	Pigoons
	Radio
	Rampart
12
	Pleebcrawl
	BlyssPluss
	MaddAddam
	Paradice
	Crake in Love
	Takeout
	Airlock
13
	Bubble
	Scribble
	Remnant
14
	Idol
	Sermon
15
	Footprint
Acknowledgments
About the Author
by Margaret Atwood
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Oryx and Crake: a novel
Margaret Atwood

I could perhaps like others have astonished you
with strange improbable tales; but I rather chose
to relate plain matter of fact in the simplest
manner and style; because my principal design
was to inform you, and not to amuse you.
Jonathan Swift,

Was there no safety? No learning by heart of
the ways of the world? No guide, no shelter,
but all was miracle and leaping from the
pinnacle of a tower into the air?
Virginia Woolf,

Page 141

tortoiselike mind to trundle up to the next rook sacrifice. Also, Jimmy could look
up grandmasters and famous games of the past on various Net programs, in
between moves. Not that Crake wasn’t doing the same thing.

After five or six months Crake loosened up a bit. He was having to work
harder than at HelthWyzer High, he wrote, because there was a lot more
competition. Watson-Crick was known to the students there as Asperger’s U.
because of the high percentage of brilliant weirdos that strolled and hopped and
lurched through its corridors. Demi-autistic, genetically speaking; single-track
tunnel-vision minds, a marked degree of social ineptitude – these were not your
sharp dressers – and luckily for everyone there, a high tolerance for mildly
deviant public behaviour.

asked Jimmy.
, Crake replied.

Jimmy asked the next week, having had some
time to think this over. Also to worry about whether he himself was a
neurotypical, and if so, was that now bad, in the gestalt of Crake? He suspected
he was, and that it was.
But Crake never answered that one. This was his way: when there was a

question he didn’t want to address, he acted as if it hadn’t been asked.
, he told Jimmy in late October of their

sophomore year.

The alternative for Jimmy was turkey with the parental-unit turkeys,
, said Jimmy, and he wasn’t up for that; so it would be his pleasure to

accept. He told himself he was being a pal and doing Crake a favour, for who did
lone Crake have to visit with on his holidays, aside from his boring old
australopithecine not-really-an-uncle Uncle Pete? But also he found he was
missing Crake. He hadn’t seen him now for more than a year. He wondered if

Page 142

Crake had changed.

Jimmy had a couple of term papers to finish before the holidays. He could
have bought them off the Net, of course – Martha Graham was notoriously lax
about scorekeeping, and plagiarism was a cottage industry there – but he’d taken
a position on that. He’d write his own papers, eccentric though it seemed; a line
that played well with the Martha Graham type of woman. They liked a dash of
originality and risk-taking and intellectual rigour.
For the same reason he’d taken to spending hours in the more obscure regions

of the library stacks, ferreting out arcane lore. Better libraries, at institutions with
more money, had long ago burned their actual books and kept everything on CD-
ROM, but Martha Graham was behind the times in that, as in everything.
Wearing a nose-cone filter to protect against the mildew, Jimmy grazed among
the shelves of mouldering paper, dipping in at random.
Part of what impelled him was stubbornness; resentment, even. The system

had filed him among the rejects, and what he was studying was considered – at
the decision-making levels, the levels of real power – an archaic waste of time.
Well then, he would pursue the superfluous as an end in itself. He would be its
champion, its defender and preserver. Who was it who’d said that all art was
completely useless? Jimmy couldn’t recall, but hooray for him, whoever he was.
The more obsolete a book was, the more eagerly Jimmy would add it to his inner
collection.
He compiled lists of old words too – words of a precision and suggestiveness

that no longer had a meaningful application in today’s world, or , as
Jimmy sometimes deliberately misspelled it on his term papers. ( , the profs
would note, which showed how alert they were.) He memorized these hoary
locutions, tossed them left-handed into conversation:

. He’d developed a strangely tender feeling towards such
words, as if they were children abandoned in the woods and it was his duty to
rescue them.
One of his term papers – for his Applied Rhetoric course – was titled “Self-

Help Books of the Twentieth Century: Exploiting Hope and Fear,” and it
supplied him with a great stand-up routine for use in the student pubs. He’d
quote snatches of this and that – ;

; ;
; ; ;

Page 281

Table of Contents
1

Mango
Flotsam
Voice

2
Bonfire
OrganInc Farms
Lunch

3
Nooners
Downpour

4
Rakunk
Hammer
Crake
Brainfrizz
HottTotts

5
Toast
Fish
Bottle

6
Oryx
Birdcall
Roses
Pixieland Jazz

7
Sveltana
Purring
Blue

8
SoYummie
Happicuppa
Applied Rhetoric
Asperger’s U.

Page 282

Wolvogs
Hypothetical
Extinctathon

9
Hike
RejoovenEsense
Twister

10
Vulturizing
AnooYoo
Garage
Gripless

11
Pigoons
Radio
Rampart

12
Pleebcrawl
BlyssPluss
MaddAddam
Paradice
Crake in Love
Takeout
Airlock

13
Bubble
Scribble
Remnant

14
Idol
Sermon

15
Footprint

Acknowledgments
About the Author
by Margaret Atwood

Similer Documents