Download On Incest (Psychoanalysis and Women Series) PDF

TitleOn Incest (Psychoanalysis and Women Series)
Author
LanguageEnglish
File Size597.0 KB
Total Pages144
Table of Contents
                            COVER
CONTENTS
FOREWORD
CONTRIBUTORS
Introduction
CHAPTER ONE: Incest yesterday and today: from conflict to ambiguity
CHAPTER TWO: Incest(s) and the negation of otherness
CHAPTER THREE: Incest: the crushed fantasy
CHAPTER FOUR: Incest: a therapeutic challenge
CHAPTER FIVE: Incest: the damaged psychic flesh
CHAPTER SIX: Counterpoints
REFERENCES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

ON INCEST

111
2
3
4
5
6
711
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
211
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
911

CHAPTER TITLE I

Ambrosio prelims 1st correx 2/10/05 11:52 AM Page i

Page 72

narcissistic expansion, the megalomanic ego of the incestuous
parents engulfs the other person, seen as a mere extension of them-
selves. The desire of the one is incompatible with that of the other.
In their “totalizing utopia”, incestuous parents experience them-
selves as having mastery over time and death. In their wish to
throw their net over the child, they try to ignore the fact that the
object, by virtue of his or her essential nature, real or fantasized,
creates a conflicting relationship with the ego. The ego of the inces-
tuous parent aims to entrap the object, but in so doing robs the
other person of all vitality (Tesone, 1998).

A female patient, who had for years been subjected to an incestuous
type of relationship with her father, had the following dream, which
reveals both the relationship of merging and non-differentiation in
which she found herself and her attempt to escape from it: “My father
is holding me by the arm, I try to break loose but I can’t. Then I bite his
arm with all my strength, and suddenly I wake up. Actually, I was
biting my own arm, so hard in fact that once I woke up, I could still see
the teeth marks on it.”

Narcissism—writes Green (1979)—sustains the illusion that a
no-Oedipus situation (not anti-Oedipus but non-Oedipus) can exist
in so far as it knows only the ego/I. “Like God, the ego considers
itself self-created, without sex, that is, without sexual limits and
without filiation, and therefore without kinship structure.”

The incestuous sexual relationship is necessarily a form of
masturbation, because here sexuality remains auto-erotic in the
sense that it is played out as though the other person had no exis-
tence. The child’s only function is to satisfy this object auto-eroti-
cism. Paraphrasing M. de M’Uzan (1965), quoted by Couvreur
(1995), I would say that there is a “spectrum of identity” between
the abusive genitor and the abused child. In this case, there is no
object-related libido as such; where ordinarily there would be two
poles, that of the object-related libido and that of its narcissistic
counterpart, with a to-and-fro movement between the two, here the
situation is very much like what M. de M’Uzan describes as tension
between two kinds of narcissistic libido: an “intra-ego” one and an
“extra-ego” one.

There is an excellent example of this particular disposition of the
libido in the patient Simona Argentieri calls V, who was afraid of

111
2
3
4
5
6
711
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
211
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
911

INCEST(S) AND THE NEGATION OF OTHERNESS 59

Ambrosio/1st correx 2/7/05 4:09 PM Page 59

Page 73

giving in to her incestuous impulses with her daughter through
masturbation. This fantasy is concomitant with a regressive dimen-
sion of being sucked in by her own mother, for whom the “third
person” of the oedipal triangle was excluded.

The myth of the Unique, that is, the illusion of being an omnipo-
tent being without defect, is a fantasy shared by most abusive
parents. Their children exist only as appendages to an ego that
delights in its own grandiosity. The child has no value per se other
than that of a narcissistic adjunct. The incestuous attempts of the
abusive parent could be represented as a triangle, the vertices of
which remain unclosed, set within a circumscribing circle (Tesone,
1994). In other words, through their expansionist utopia, abusive
parents intend to undo the vertices of the oedipal triangle, encir-
cling it within their megalomania of the Unique. Between the
abusive father and his young daughter, there is no relationship like
that between self and object; the disappearance of the object leaves
only a relationship within the self. Here we find ourselves involved
in a fantasy of the existence of a Double, the guarantee of narcissis-
tic completeness.

The desperate quest of incestuous parents is often motivated—
as Simona Argentieri emphasizes—by confusion between mascu-
line and feminine, and the impossibility to mourn the loss of
androgyny.

In his famous article on the confusion of tongues between chil-
dren and adults, Ferenczi (1932) highlights the fact that confusion
arises precisely when the adult responds to a request for tenderness
from the child with the language of eroticization. The child’s initial
reaction, says Ferenczi, is one of rejection, hate, disgust, and violent
resistance. However, when the intimidation persists, the aggressor
is introjected and disappears as a figure in external reality. The
aggressor feels no guilt, since guilt is projected into the child. And
the child, by introjecting the guilt feelings evacuated by the adult,
later demands punishment. Incest, as Simona Argentieri empha-
sizes, “constructs a complicated and complex architecture of guilt,
ubiquitous in the case of the unconscious fantasy, and, paradoxi-
cally, inequitably distributed in cases where incest has actually been
carried out”.

This guilt often leads children who have experienced an inces-
tuous relationship to have accidents repeatedly or even actually

111
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
711
8
9
20
1
2
3
4
511
6
7
8
9
311
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
911

60 ON INCEST

Ambrosio/1st correx 2/7/05 4:09 PM Page 60

Page 143

& R. Wallerstein (Eds.), Psychoanalysis on the Move. The work of Joseph
Sandler (pp. 201–216). London: Routledge.

Carratelli, T. (1995). Padre e madre . . . in cerca di papà e mamma. In
Bollettino A.I.Psi., 3: 18–24.

Carratelli, T. (1995). Transfert e trasmissione della vita psichica tra
generazioni, intervento alla “Tavola Rotonda” Il mito di Edipo rivisi-
tato del Convegno ASNE-SIPSIA, 11 November, Rome.

Darwin, C. (1859). The Origin of Species, London:
Darwin, C. (1871) The Descent of Man. London.
Ferenczi, S. (1933)[1949]. Confusion of tongues between the adult and

the child. (The language of tenderness and of passion). International
Journal of Psychoanalysis, 30(IV): 225–230.

Frazer, J. G. (1910). Totemism and Esogamy. London.
Gaddini, E. (1989). Scritti—1953–1985. Milan: R. Cortina.
Grossmann, W. (2001). Presentazione del “modo psicoanalitico di

pensare” di Freud in Totem e tabù e negli scritti sulla tecnica. Psico-
analisi, 5(2): 101–126.

Lévi-Strauss, C. (1958). Anthropologie structurale. Paris: Plon.
Lévi-Strauss, C. (1962). Le totémisme aujourd’hui. Paris: PUF.
Lowie, R. (1917). Culture and Ethnology. New York: D. C. McMurtrie.
Malinowski, B., 1944[1971], Teoria scientifica della cultura e altri saggi.

Milan: Feltrinelli.
McLennan, J. F. (1896). An Inquiry into the Origin of Exogamy. London:

Macmillan.
Mead, M. (1949). Male and Female. New York: W. Morrow.
Molfino, F. (1995). Seduzione del padre, seduzione della madre. In:

Corpo a corpo (pp. 98–112). Bari: Laterza.
Sandler, J., & Sandler, A.-M. (1983). The second censorship, the three

box model and some technical implication. International Journal of
Psycho-Analysis, 64: 413–425.

Tesone, J. E. (1996). L’inceste: le triangle défait. Revista de Psicologia y
psicoterapia de Grupo, Buenos Aires 1994. e in Psyche, 9/10, Stuttgart.

Tesone, J. E. (1998). Une activité peu masculine: l’inceste père–-fille,
Revue Francaise de Psychanalyse, LXII(2): 513–525.

Tesone, J. E. (2001). De la théorie de la séduction à la séduction trau-
matique: l’inceste. Workshop, 42nd IPA Conference, Nice.

Welldon, E. V. (1988). Mother, Madonna, Whore: The Idealisation and
Denigration of Motherhood. Free Association Books, [reprinted New
York: Guilford Press, 1992].

Zucconi, S. (2002) L’Edipo oggi. Psicoanalisi, 6(1): 95–108.

111
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
711
8
9
20
1
2
3
4
511
6
7
8
9
311
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
911

130 BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ambrosio/1st correx 2/7/05 4:09 PM Page 130

Page 144

111
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
711
8
9
20
1
2
3
4
511
6
7
8
9
311
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
911

Ambrosio/1st correx 2/7/05 4:09 PM Page 132

Similer Documents