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TitleNo Little People
LanguageEnglish
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Total Pages241
Table of Contents
                            CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION BY UDO MIDDELMANN
FOREWORD
1 NO LITTLE PEOPLE NO LITTLE PLACES
2 THE HAND OF GOD
3 THE WEAKNESS OF GOD’S SERVANTS
4 THE LORD’S WORK IN THE LORD’S WAY
5 WALKING THROUGH THE MUD
6 JOSEPH
7 THE ARK THE MERCY SEAT AND THE INCENSE ALTAR
8 DAVID LAWFUL AND UNLAWFUL VINDICATION
9 ELIJAH AND ELISHA
10 THE THREE MEN IN THE FIERY FURNACE
11 WHAT DIFFERENCE HAS LOOKING MADE
12 JESUS ONLY
13 THE WATER OF LIFE
14 THE BOOK OF REVELATION FUTURE YET A UNITY
15 WHAT IS ENOUGH
16 ASH HEAP LIVES
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

N O L I T T L E P E O P L E

Page 120

Uriah’s own hand. A clever plan—Go ahead, Joab, have him

killed—which was exactly what happened. Joab soon sent a word

to David which taunted him and highlighted David’s deceitfulness.

Joab instructed his messenger, saying in essence, “Tell David that

some people were killed near the wall of the city we were attack-

ing. When he says, ‘Joab, you’re a fool. Why did you get so close to

the wall?’ then spring the trap on him. Say, ‘Your servant Uriah the

Hittite is dead, too’” (2 Sam. 11:21).

When Bathsheba heard the news, she mourned for her hus-

band. But “when the mourning was past, David sent and fetched

her to his house, and she became his wife, and bore him a son”

(2 Sam. 11:27). Everything was now in good order in the society.

The baby would be born and have a father. Everything was nor-

mal except for one thing: what David had done was evil in the

eyes of the Lord. God said, “It’s sin” and sent his prophet Nathan

to David:

And he came unto him, and said unto him, There were two men in

one city; the one rich, and the other poor. The rich man had exceeding

many flocks and herds, but the poor man had nothing, save one little

ewe lamb, which he had bought and nourished up; and it grew up

together with him, and with his children. It did eat of his own food and

drank of his own cup, and lay in his bosom, and was unto him as a

daughter. And there came a traveler unto the rich man, and he spared

to take of his own flock and of his own herd, to dress for the wayfar-

ing man who was come unto him, but took the poor man�s lamb, and

dressed it for the man who was come to him. And David�s anger was

greatly kindled against the man; and he said to Nathan, As the LORD

liveth, the man who hath done this thing shall surely die. And he shall

restore the lamb fourfold, because he did this thing, and because he had

no pity. (2 Sam. 12:1-6)

This was David—king of the people of God and therefore

judge and mediator of the law of Moses—thinking properly. The

law of God, which was not only the Jews’ religious law but also

David: Lawful and Unlawful Vindica t ion 119

Page 121

their civil law, was in operation, and David had spoken as judge. His

words were incisive—“because he had no pity.” But Nathan turned

the matter and put David on trial: “Thou art the man” (2 Sam.

12:7). Nathan did not charge David primarily with adultery, though

adulterer he had been. He charged David with murder: “Wherefore

hast thou despised the commandment of the LORD, to do evil in

his sight? Thou hast killed Uriah, the Hittite, with the sword, and

hast taken his wife to be thy wife, and hast slain him with the sword

of the children of Ammon” (2 Sam. 12:9).

David was not brought face to face with some humanistic prin-

ciple. He was confronted with the eternal law of God: “thou [hast]

despised the commandment of the Lord.” That he was one step

removed from the killing did not change God’s judgment. David

had committed murder just as though he had taken his own sword

and run Uriah through. Nathan reminded David that he had vio-

lated God’s law (his sin was not just against society), and then he

prophesied, “Now, therefore, the sword shall never depart from

thine house, because thou hast despised me” (2 Sam. 12:10). In

despising the commandment of the Lord, David had despised the

Lord Himself. There is no difference: to despise one is to despise

the other. David had despised the law of God which as king it was

his calling to administer.

David was sorry and responded by making his great confession:

“I have sinned against the LORD” (2 Sam. 12:13). He wrote Psalm

51, a psalm of confession.

Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy loving-kindness;

according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my trans-

gressions. Wash me thoroughly from mine iniquity, and cleanse me

from my sin. For I acknowledge my transgressions, and my sin is ever

before me. Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil

in thy sight, that thou mightest be justified when thou speakest, and

be clear when thou judgest. Behold, I was shapen in iniquity, and in

sin did my mother conceive me. Behold, thou desirest truth in the

inward parts, and in the hidden part thou shalt make me know wis-

120 N O L I T T L E P E O P L E

Page 240

shall be burned, he shall suffer loss; but he himself shall be saved, yet

as by fire. (1 Cor. 3:10-15)

A Christian has only one foundation: Jesus Christ his Savior.

And on that foundation he builds�with either combustible or

noncombustible material. One day there will be a believers� judg-

ment because we live in a moral universe and every book must be

balanced in the presence of the holy judge, and in that judgment the

fire will come. I picture it as a great prairie fire which sweeps along

burning everything in its path. Suddenly it comes to a great rock,

leaps up over it, and passes on. Everything on that rock which can

be burned (the wood, hay and stubble) is consumed; everything that

cannot be burned (the gold, silver and precious stones) stands for

eternity. The Spirit inspired Paul to make it plain (and Paul knew the

question would arise) that this does not concern salvation. The

building may be destroyed, but the builder still will live. The tragedy

is that after we are born again, we can build upon the Rock things

that are going to be consumed, so that after we have stood before the

Lord Jesus Christ as Judge we have little left. This is a danger not

only to businessmen but to missionaries and ministers, not only to

individuals but to congregations and organizations.

By God�s grace, let us not be infiltrated by the values of afflu-

ence and personal peace. Let us use the treasures God has given us

in such a way that when we come to that day we will have treasures

laid up in Heaven and people eagerly waiting for us.

Ash Heap Lives 239

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