Download Microsoft Business Intelligence for Dummies (ISBN - 0470526939) PDF

TitleMicrosoft Business Intelligence for Dummies (ISBN - 0470526939)
TagsFor Dummies
LanguageEnglish
File Size8.3 MB
Total Pages436
Table of Contents
                            Microsoft Business Intelligenec For Dummies
	About the Author
	Dedication
	Author’s Acknowledgments
	Contents at a Glance
	Table of Contents
	Introduction
		About This Book
		How to Use This Book
		How This Book Is Organized
		Icons Used In This Book
		Let’s Get Started!
	Part I: Embracing a Microsoft Business Intelligence Solution
		Chapter 1: Surveying Microsoft Business Intelligence from 50,000 Feet
			Introducing Microsoft Business Intelligence
			Getting to the Core of Microsoft BI
			Microsoft BI Data Presentation
			Microsoft BI Development Tools
		Chapter 2: Blazing a Trail through the Data Jungle
			Exploring the Data Lifecycle
			Understanding How Microsoft BI Fits into the Data Lifecycle
			Juggling Data
			It’s a Flood of Data! Headed This Way!
		Chapter 3: Adopting Microsoft Business Intelligence
			Understanding the Adoption Process
			Documenting Your Key Business Processes
			Understanding Where to Find Microsoft BI Guidance
	Part II: Wrapping Your Head Around Business Intelligence Concepts
		Chapter 4: Using Data to Inform and Drive Business Activities
			The Importance of Data in Making Business Decisions
			Why All the Fuss about OLAP?
		Chapter 5: Taking a Closer Look at Data Collection
			The King of BI Concepts — ETL
			SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) — Microsoft’s ETL Tool
			A Simple SSIS Walk-Through
			Exploring Data Generation
		Chapter 6: Turning Data into Information
			Data Storage for BI
			111 Understanding SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS)
			Getting Familiar with SharePoint
		Chapter 7: Data Mining for Information Gold
			Going Deep with Data Mining
			Digging In to Data Mining in the Microsoft World
			Knowing the Microsoft Data-Mining Tools
			Using Microsoft Data Mining Algorithms
	Part III: Introducing the Microsoft Business Intelligence Technologies
		Chapter 8: Meeting SQL Server
			First Contact with SQL Server
			Primary Components of SQL Server
			Looking at the Different Versions of SQL Server
			Installing SQL Server
			Checking Out SQL Server Tools
		Chapter 9: Excel — Digital Data Power to the People
			Excel as a BI Application
			Generating Data
			Collecting Data
			Getting Organized
			Show Me the Data! — Data Visualization
			Analyzing Data: Pivot on This and Pivot on That
			Data Mining with Excel
			Keeping Score with the Excel Scorecard
			Knowing the Limits of Excel
			Looking at the Future of Excel
		Chapter 10: SharePoint Shines
			Getting to Know SharePoint
			Making BI Information Available in SharePoint
			Unleashing Human Business Intelligence with SharePoint
			Learning What Was Added with SharePoint Server 2010
		Chapter 11: Expressing Yourself with Development Tools
			Taking a Look at Visual Studio
			Examining the .NET Framework
			Exploring Report Builder
			Diving In to SQL Server Management Studio
			Getting to Know SharePoint Designer
			Seeing the (Silver) light and Tasting Expression Blend
			Understanding PerformancePoint
	Part IV: Incorporating Microsoft Business Intelligence into Your Business Environment
		Chapter 12: Setting Your BI Goals and Implementation Plan
			Setting Your Business Intelligence Goals
			Determining Your Implementation Plan
		Chapter 13: Evaluating and Choosing Technologies
			Assessing Your BI Capabilities
			Choosing Technologies to Incorporate
			Utilizing Free BI Tools: Try Before You Buy
			Reducing Risk
		Chapter 14: Testing and Rolling Out
			Continuously Adding Value
			Testing Your BI Implementation
			Rolling It Out — Again and Again
			Having a BI Management Plan
			Managing Change
		Chapter 15: Training, Using, and Evaluating Results
			Tackling Training Efforts
			Evaluating Results
			Incorporating Feedback
			Creating a BI Culture
	Part V: The Part of Tens
		Chapter 16: Ten Microsoft BI Implementation Pitfalls
			Drowning Under the Waterfall
			Getting Stuck on the Shelf(-ware)
			Letting Politics Kill the BI Project
			Ignoring IT
			Disregarding Power Users
			Snubbing Business Processes
			Overpromising Results
			Getting Squashed by Top-Down Decree
			Skimping on the Foundation
			Misjudging How to Use Consultants
		Chapter 17: Ten Keys to Successful Microsoft Business Intelligence
			Reiterating an Iterative Approach
			Obtaining Executive-Level Sponsorship
			Assessing Your Current Environment
			Developing an Implementation Plan
			Choosing the Right People for the Implementation Team
			Creating an Inclusive Environment
			Fostering a Culture of Communication and Collaboration
			Starting with the Right Goals
			Reducing Risk
			Maintaining Perspective
		Chapter 18: Ten Ways to Boost Your Bottom Line with Microsoft Business Intelligence
			Increasing Efficiency
			Improving Agility
			Increasing the Visibility of Business Processes
			Forecasting
			Taking Advantage of Existing Skill Sets
			Collaborating and Communicating
			Reusing Code in Various Functional Areas
			Consolidating Content
			Increasing Productivity
			Making Deep Use of SQL Server and SharePoint
	Glossary
	Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

97804705269353499.eps


Ken Withee

Learn to:
• Apply the latest Microsoft technologies

and use them together

• Create an effective strategy to solve
business problems

• Work with the SQL Server® product
suite

• Use the new SharePoint® Business
Intelligence tools

Microsoft
® Business

Intelligence

Making Everythin
g Easier!



Open the book and find:

• BI tools that are already hiding in
your software

• How to manage the data life cycle

• Tips for evaluating and choosing
technologies

• What you can do with Dashboards
and Scorecards

• Nearly a dozen data mining
algorithms

• Ways to display and analyze data

• Advice on testing and rolling out
your BI strategy

• Keys to making BI successful

Ken Withee is a Microsoft SharePoint and Business Intelligence consultant and

a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist. He is certified in SharePoint, SQL

Server, and .NET. Among his many published works are a book on SSRS 2008

and a featured article on Self-Serve Business Intelligence in The Architecture

Journal.

$34.99 US / $41.99 CN / £24.99 UK

ISBN 978-0-470-52693-4

Computers/Data Processing

Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step examples,

how-to articles, or to shop!

The book that beats the buzzwords!
At last, understand BI and what
it can do for your business
Buzzwords, begone! This book looks beyond the jargon at
real business problems and common-sense solutions. Data
is the lifeblood of your business. Microsoft BI tools help you
collect that data; sort, store, and analyze it; find it when
you need it; and use it to make decisions. You’ll understand
terms like “OLAP cube” and “data mart” — at last!

• It’s all about the right tools — learn which BI technologies can
solve specific issues for your business

• Realistic expectations — get a clear understanding of what you
expect to achieve with BI

• Meet the parts — see how the SQL Server technologies,
presentation technologies, and development/customization
technologies work together

• The right edge — support decision-making by using BI to get the
right data to the right person at the right time

• Storing this stuff — understand how data warehouses and data
marts make it easier to manage and retrieve data

• The tool on your desktop — discover how to use Excel® for data
analysis and data mining

• Making it work — create a logical plan for BI implementation,
know what you need and what you don’t, and get stakeholders
on board

M
icro

so
ft

® B
u

sin
ess In

tellig
en

ce

Withee

spine=.86”

Page 2

spine=.86”

Start with FREE Cheat Sheets
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• Checklists
• Charts
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• And Other Good Stuff!

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To access the Cheat Sheet created specifically for this book, go to
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http://www.dummies.com/cheatsheet/microsoftbusinessintelligence

Page 218

198 Part III: Introducing the Microsoft Business Intelligence Technologies
Services (SSAS). Microsoft has released a Data Mining Add-In for Excel that
grants the humble spreadsheet formidable data-mining powers (Chapter 7
describes those, including the various available algorithms and what they
accomplish).

No need to break out the chalk and blackboard; you can make ready use of
these algorithms from within Excel. The process works like this: Excel runs
on your desktop, and the Data Mining Engine (part of SQL Server Analysis
Services) runs on a server somewhere in a data center. Your computer and
the server in the data center communicate with each other using the net-
work. Excel can connect to that server as a client and use the power of the
SSAS algorithms that hang out on the server.

Of course, before you can use Excel to unleash SSAS data-mining capabili-
ties, you have to install the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Data Mining Add-In for
Microsoft Office. (Details, details.)

Instructions for downloading and installing the Microsoft SQL Server 2008
Data Mining Add-In for Microsoft Office can be found at

www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.
aspx?FamilyId=896A493A-2502-4795-94AE-
E00632BA6DE7&displaylang=en.

It’s worth the hassle: The Add-In is what gives Excel the superpowers to per-
form data mining, as described in Table 9-2. Note that the Add-In is also used
for Office Visio as described in the table.

Table 9-2 Data Mining Add-In Functionality

Feature Description

Table Analysis Tools for
Excel

Provides tasks that use the data-mining fea-
tures of SQL Server 2008 on spreadsheet data.

Data Mining Client for Excel Provides a client application that you run
from within Excel to create, test, explore, and
manage data-mining models (for more about
those, see Chapter 7).

Data Mining Templates for
Visio

Gives you a way to use Microsoft Visio from
within Excel to create and share data-mining
models.

When the Data Mining Add-In is installed, a new tab (see Figure 9-23) appears
and makes the new capabilities available on the Excel Ribbon.

15_526934-ch09.indd 19815_526934-ch09.indd 198 2/26/10 9:15 AM2/26/10 9:15 AM

Page 219

199 Chapter 9: Excel — Digital Data Power to the People



Figure 9-23:
Here’s what
data-mining
functionality
looks like in

Excel.

The new Data Mining tab

To do its magic, the Data Mining Add-In requires an active connection to the
SSAS server. You can ask your database administrator for the proper con-
figuration information or you can download and install a trial version on your
local desktop (but let your IT folks know if you do that — trust me, they’d
want to know). When you open Excel with the Data Mining Add-In already
installed, the add-in immediately demands SSAS access; you’re prompted to
take one of these actions:

✓ Install a trial version of SSAS. (Just remember, you’ll have to either buy
the thing or uninstall it later.)

✓ Connect to an SSAS instance that you administer (which is fine if you’re
the Big Kahuna of the company database).

✓ Connect to an SSAS instance that your kindly database administrator
has configured for you.

Microsoft also provides a sample Excel document, complete with sample
data, to use while you’re trying the Data Mining Add-In. You can access this
Excel spreadsheet at the following location:

Start > All Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Add-ins > Sample Excel Data

Figure 9-24 illustrates the Forecasting feature of the Data Mining Add-In, using
the Sample Excel Data.

If you’re trying to use the Data Mining Add-In for its namesake purpose and an
error message pops up to tell you that a default database doesn’t exist, then
somebody forgot to run through the Configuration Wizard to set up the Data
Mining Add-In. You can remedy this woeful situation by accessing the Wizard:
Click the Data Mining tab in the Excel Ribbon and then select Help➪Getting
Started.

15_526934-ch09.indd 19915_526934-ch09.indd 199 2/26/10 9:15 AM2/26/10 9:15 AM

Page 435

Ken Withee

Learn to:
• Apply the latest Microsoft technologies

and use them together

• Create an effective strategy to solve
business problems

• Work with the SQL Server® product
suite

• Use the new SharePoint® Business
Intelligence tools

Microsoft
® Business

Intelligence

Making Everythin
g Easier!



Open the book and find:

• BI tools that are already hiding in
your software

• How to manage the data life cycle

• Tips for evaluating and choosing
technologies

• What you can do with Dashboards
and Scorecards

• Nearly a dozen data mining
algorithms

• Ways to display and analyze data

• Advice on testing and rolling out
your BI strategy

• Keys to making BI successful

Ken Withee is a Microsoft SharePoint and Business Intelligence consultant and

a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist. He is certified in SharePoint, SQL

Server, and .NET. Among his many published works are a book on SSRS 2008

and a featured article on Self-Serve Business Intelligence in The Architecture

Journal.

$34.99 US / $41.99 CN / £24.99 UK

ISBN 978-0-470-52693-4

Computers/Data Processing

Go to Dummies.com®
for videos, step-by-step examples,

how-to articles, or to shop!

The book that beats the buzzwords!
At last, understand BI and what
it can do for your business
Buzzwords, begone! This book looks beyond the jargon at
real business problems and common-sense solutions. Data
is the lifeblood of your business. Microsoft BI tools help you
collect that data; sort, store, and analyze it; find it when
you need it; and use it to make decisions. You’ll understand
terms like “OLAP cube” and “data mart” — at last!

• It’s all about the right tools — learn which BI technologies can
solve specific issues for your business

• Realistic expectations — get a clear understanding of what you
expect to achieve with BI

• Meet the parts — see how the SQL Server technologies,
presentation technologies, and development/customization
technologies work together

• The right edge — support decision-making by using BI to get the
right data to the right person at the right time

• Storing this stuff — understand how data warehouses and data
marts make it easier to manage and retrieve data

• The tool on your desktop — discover how to use Excel® for data
analysis and data mining

• Making it work — create a logical plan for BI implementation,
know what you need and what you don’t, and get stakeholders
on board

M
icro

so
ft

® B
u

sin
ess In

tellig
en

ce

Withee

spine=.86”

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